Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

ASCO: Younger colon cancer patients have worse prognosis at diagnosis, yet better survival

31.05.2012
Younger patients with colorectal cancer were more likely to present advanced stage tumors at diagnosis and metastasize much sooner, yet had better than or equal survival to patients 50 and older, according to data being presented at the 2012 American Society of Clinical Oncology Annual Meeting in Chicago. (Abstract #3621, Monday, June 4, 8:00 AM - 12:00 PM CST, S Hall A2).

The study was led by Edith Mitchell, M.D., a clinical professor in the Department of Medical Oncology at Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University. Dr. Mitchell is also Director of the newly-established Center to Eliminate Cancer Disparities at Jefferson's Kimmel Cancer Center.

"We're seeing more advanced tumors in this population because the cases aren't being caught early enough," said Dr. Mitchell. "Screening isn't recommended until age 50, and the younger a patient is, the more likely they are to ignore symptoms of more advanced stages of the disease."

The objective of this study was to assess pathological features and outcomes of colorectal cancer in patients less than age 50 using an institutional sample and comparing to the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) database.

Dr. Mitchell and colleagues obtained data from the tumor registry of Thomas Jefferson University Hospital (TJUH) on 4,595 patients treated for colorectal cancer from 1988 to 2007. They compared those data with data obtained from the National Cancer Institute's Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) database on 290,338 patients with colorectal cancer treated from 1988 to 2004. The researchers collected data on location, stage and histologic grade of the cancer.

Patients under age 50 with colorectal cancer presented with more advanced stage tumors in both data sets (SEER and TJUH), and had more poorly differentiated tumors than older patients, the researchers found. Patients under 50 also had more mucinous/signet ring cell tumors with 12 percent to 8.1 percent in the TJUH data and 13.2 percent to 10.3 percent in the SEER data, with younger males having the highest prevalence in both data sets.

Younger patients had fewer right-side tumors than patients 50 and over, and a higher proportion of rectal tumors. Patients under age 50 were also more likely to have positive nodes at all stages relative to 50 and over, as well as more likely to develop peritoneal metastases, but less likely to have lung metastases than older patients.

Despite their poor pathologic features, patients under age 50 had better than or equal survival to those 50 and older, which may in part be explained by their overall health. Early evidence suggests that younger patients are able to tolerate more aggressive cancer therapies because of fewer co-morbidities, said co-author Scott Goldstein, M.D., of Jefferson's Department of Surgery.

"Ongoing studies will help clarify the survival disparity and assess differences in treatment and molecular features between younger and older colorectal cancer patients," Dr. Mitchell said.

Other researchers included Allan Topham, Pramila R. Anne, of Jefferson's Department of Radiation Oncology, Gerald Isenberg, M.D., of Jefferson's Department of Surgery, Fran Guiles of Jefferson's Oncology Data Services, and Juan Palazzo, M.D., of Jefferson's Department of Pathology, Anatomy and Cell Biology.

Also see: Thomas Jefferson University Hospital Oncologists and Surgeons Treating More Colon Cancer Patients Under 50

Steve Graff | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.jefferson.edu

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: The spin state story: Observation of the quantum spin liquid state in novel material

New insight into the spin behavior in an exotic state of matter puts us closer to next-generation spintronic devices

Aside from the deep understanding of the natural world that quantum physics theory offers, scientists worldwide are working tirelessly to bring forth a...

Im Focus: Excitation of robust materials

Kiel physics team observed extremely fast electronic changes in real time in a special material class

In physics, they are currently the subject of intensive research; in electronics, they could enable completely new functions. So-called topological materials...

Im Focus: Electrons in the fast lane

Solar cells based on perovskite compounds could soon make electricity generation from sunlight even more efficient and cheaper. The laboratory efficiency of these perovskite solar cells already exceeds that of the well-known silicon solar cells. An international team led by Stefan Weber from the Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research (MPI-P) in Mainz has found microscopic structures in perovskite crystals that can guide the charge transport in the solar cell. Clever alignment of these "electron highways" could make perovskite solar cells even more powerful.

Solar cells convert sunlight into electricity. During this process, the electrons of the material inside the cell absorb the energy of the light....

Im Focus: The lightest electromagnetic shielding material in the world

Empa researchers have succeeded in applying aerogels to microelectronics: Aerogels based on cellulose nanofibers can effectively shield electromagnetic radiation over a wide frequency range – and they are unrivalled in terms of weight.

Electric motors and electronic devices generate electromagnetic fields that sometimes have to be shielded in order not to affect neighboring electronic...

Im Focus: Gentle wall contact – the right scenario for a fusion power plant

Quasi-continuous power exhaust developed as a wall-friendly method on ASDEX Upgrade

A promising operating mode for the plasma of a future power plant has been developed at the ASDEX Upgrade fusion device at Max Planck Institute for Plasma...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

Contact Tracing Apps against COVID-19: German National Academy Leopoldina hosts international virtual panel discussion

07.07.2020 | Event News

International conference QuApps shows status quo of quantum technology

02.07.2020 | Event News

Dresden Nexus Conference 2020: Same Time, Virtual Format, Registration Opened

19.05.2020 | Event News

 
Latest News

X-ray scattering shines light on protein folding

10.07.2020 | Life Sciences

Looking at linkers helps to join the dots

10.07.2020 | Materials Sciences

Surprisingly many peculiar long introns found in brain genes

10.07.2020 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>