Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

New technique to treating mitral valve diseases: First patient data

22.08.2017

Heart valve diseases in advanced age are frequent and require customised therapeutic options. A new development in this field has been used for the first time worldwide at Inselspital, Bern University Hospital. Its Department of Cardiology has now evaluated the first international patient data.

More and more people are fulfilling the wish for an active lifestyle into old age. But the societal trend is proceeding to the detriment of the heart, because use over the course of many years can render the mitral valve (the valve between the left atrium and the left ventricle) leaky.


Starting from an inguinal vessel, the newly developed implant is introduced into the left atrium of the heart and placed at the site of the mitral valve leakage.

Inselspital, Bern University Hospital

As a result, the heart has additional work due to the backlog of blood. Shortness of breath and ineffciency come about. Almost ten percent of the population over 75 years of age is affected. The development of safe and gentle treatment options for elderly patients with the shortest possible hospital stay is therefore a crucial challenge of contemporary cardiology.

When open heart surgery is out of the question

The optimal treatment of mitral valve diseases is still open heart surgery. But this major intervention poses a risk for many elderly patients because concomitant diseases often exist. As an alternative, the valve can be treated with a catheter through the groin in a minimally invasive (keyhole) procedure. Today cardiologists insert a clip here that repairs the leaking mitral valve. But the clip cannot be inserted with all patients, especially if the heart valve is severely altered.

A new American reconstruction system now has the potential to remedy this restriction. It also comes into question with such anatomically altered heart valves which could not be treated by means of catheter up to now. Cardiologists hope for a reduction in the number and duration of hospital stays and an improved quality of life for those affected.

First use at Bern University Hospital

The Departments of Cardiology and of Cardiovascular Surgery at Bern University Hospital are internationally renowned in the development of gentle and innovative treatment procedures for patients with heart valve diseases. Due to this reputation the new system was used for the first time worldwide in September 2016 at Inselspital, Bern University Hospital. Seven heart valve centres from five different countries (Germany, Greece, Canada, USA and Switzerland) subsequently verified the safety and feasibility of the procedure among elderly persons.

The evaluation of patient data under the leadership of Prof. Dr. med. Stephan Windecker at Bern University Hospital revealed that the new system can be used reliably among patients who were difficult to treat with available techniques. In addition, it closed the leaking mitral valve very effectively: 95 percent of patients indicated a noticeable improvement of their complaints after the procedure. These promising results will now be confirmed in long-term studies with a larger patient population before the new system can be approved. The initial evaluation was published on 19 August in “The Lancet”.

Contact:
Prof. Dr. med. Stephan Windecker, Director and Chief Physician, Department of Cardiology, Inselspital, Bern University Hospital, +41 31 63 2 44 97, Stephan.Windecker@insel.ch

Weitere Informationen:

http://www.thelancet.com/journals/lancet/article/PIIS0140-6736(17)31600-8/fullte...

Monika Kugemann | Universitätsspital Bern
Further information:
http://www.insel.ch

More articles from Medical Engineering:

nachricht New insight into the brain’s hidden depths: Jena scientists develop minimally-invasive endoscope
27.11.2018 | Leibniz-Institut für Photonische Technologien e. V.

nachricht New China and US studies back use of pulse oximeters for assessing blood pressure
21.11.2018 | University of British Columbia

All articles from Medical Engineering >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Data storage using individual molecules

Researchers from the University of Basel have reported a new method that allows the physical state of just a few atoms or molecules within a network to be controlled. It is based on the spontaneous self-organization of molecules into extensive networks with pores about one nanometer in size. In the journal ‘small’, the physicists reported on their investigations, which could be of particular importance for the development of new storage devices.

Around the world, researchers are attempting to shrink data storage devices to achieve as large a storage capacity in as small a space as possible. In almost...

Im Focus: Data use draining your battery? Tiny device to speed up memory while also saving power

The more objects we make "smart," from watches to entire buildings, the greater the need for these devices to store and retrieve massive amounts of data quickly without consuming too much power.

Millions of new memory cells could be part of a computer chip and provide that speed and energy savings, thanks to the discovery of a previously unobserved...

Im Focus: An energy-efficient way to stay warm: Sew high-tech heating patches to your clothes

Personal patches could reduce energy waste in buildings, Rutgers-led study says

What if, instead of turning up the thermostat, you could warm up with high-tech, flexible patches sewn into your clothes - while significantly reducing your...

Im Focus: Lethal combination: Drug cocktail turns off the juice to cancer cells

A widely used diabetes medication combined with an antihypertensive drug specifically inhibits tumor growth – this was discovered by researchers from the University of Basel’s Biozentrum two years ago. In a follow-up study, recently published in “Cell Reports”, the scientists report that this drug cocktail induces cancer cell death by switching off their energy supply.

The widely used anti-diabetes drug metformin not only reduces blood sugar but also has an anti-cancer effect. However, the metformin dose commonly used in the...

Im Focus: New Foldable Drone Flies through Narrow Holes in Rescue Missions

A research team from the University of Zurich has developed a new drone that can retract its propeller arms in flight and make itself small to fit through narrow gaps and holes. This is particularly useful when searching for victims of natural disasters.

Inspecting a damaged building after an earthquake or during a fire is exactly the kind of job that human rescuers would like drones to do for them. A flying...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

ICTM Conference 2019: Digitization emerges as an engineering trend for turbomachinery construction

12.12.2018 | Event News

New Plastics Economy Investor Forum - Meeting Point for Innovations

10.12.2018 | Event News

EGU 2019 meeting: Media registration now open

06.12.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Pressure tuned magnetism paves the way for novel electronic devices

18.12.2018 | Materials Sciences

New type of low-energy nanolaser that shines in all directions

18.12.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

NASA research reveals Saturn is losing its rings at 'worst-case-scenario' rate

18.12.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>