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Trichoplax genome sequenced -- 'rosetta stone' for understanding evolution

05.09.2008
Yale molecular and evolutionary biologists in collaboration with Department of Energy scientists produced the full genome sequence of Trichoplax, one of nature's most primitive multicellular organisms, providing a new insight into the evolution of all higher animals.

The findings reported in the online edition of the journal Nature show that while Trichoplax has one of the smallest nuclear genomes found in a multi-cellular creature, it contains signature sequences for gene regulation found in more complex animals and humans. Further, it defines Trichoplax as a branching point of animal evolution.

"Trichoplax placozoans are animals that have only four body cell types and no structured organs. They represent descendents of the oldest multi-celled animal, perhaps older even than sponges," said author Stephen Dellaporta, professor of molecular, cellular and developmental biology at Yale.

This study shows that compared with the nuclear genome of humans that contains 3 billion base pairs, Trichoplax has only 98 million. Earlier sequencing work showed that the mitochondrial genome of Trichoplax is over twice the size of those found in most animals with genes, introns and spacer sequences like the most primitive organisms.

However, size is not all that matters. DNA sequences that organisms share in common represents what was in their genomes at the time of their divergence. Unlike other model systems for studying evolution, including fruit flies and worms, even the arrangement of genes is conserved between the Trichoplax and human genomes.

"Trichoplax shares over 80 percent of its genes with humans," said Dellaporta. "We are exited to find that Trichoplax contains shared pathways and defined regulatory sequences that link these most primitive ancestors to higher animal species. The Trichoplax genome will serve as a type of "Rosetta Stone" for understanding the origins of animal-specific pathways."

Trichoplax is from an ancient lineage and brings significant insights to understanding how animal life evolved from the common ancestor 600 million years ago. The consortium believes that the Trichoplax genome establishes a new standard basal group for the comparative analysis of animal genomes, genes, and biological processes.

The genome portal for Trichoplax is http://genome.jgi-psf.org/Triad1/Triad1.home.html and further information about the Trichoplax project at Yale can be found at http://www.peabody.yale.edu/collections/iz/iz_genome.html

Study co-authors include Mansi Srivastava, Emina Begovic, Jarrod Chapman, Uffe Hellsten, Takeshi Kawashima, Alan Kuo, Therese Mitros, Asaf Salamov, Meredith Carpenter, Ana Signorovitch, Maria Moreno, Kai Kamm, Jane Grimwood, Jeremy Schmutz, Harris Shapiro, Igor Grigoriev, Leo Buss, Bernd Schierwater, Stephen Dellaporta and Daniel Rokhsar. Funding for this work was from the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, the National Science Foundation, the German Science Foundation and the Human Frontiers Science Program.

Citation: Nature (early online August 21, 2008)

Janet Rettig Emanuel | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.yale.edu

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