Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Team Tracking Potential New Salamander Species

18.08.2009
They've been living on a small ridge in the Blue Ridge mountains probably for centuries, but only now are they being discovered.

What may prove to be new species of salamander is being investigated in the George Washington National Forest by Washington and Lee University professor and his students.

"I think it's very exciting from a local biodiversity perspective," said David Marsh, associate professor of biology at W&L.

"Some peaks in the Blue Ridge mountains are the equivalent of the Galapagos Islands for salamanders," said Marsh. "These mountains never had glaciers, so salamanders have been up there for a very long time. Groups of salamanders probably became isolated on some of the ridgetops and went off on their own evolutionary trajectories."

Marsh and two W&L biology majors have spent the summer conducting ongoing research into a possible new species called the Sherando salamander. It lives on top of a tiny ridge 20 miles north of the University's Lexington campus. The range of the salamander appears to be about only six kilometers long and to extend three kilometers on each side.

"We want to find out if the Sherando is, in fact, a new species," said Marsh. "Where on the ridge does this new salamander begin and the other more common Red Back salamander, which lives further down the ridge, stop? How did the Sherando get on top of this one little ridge by itself? How long has it been isolated?"

W&L junior Claire Bayer and senior Andrew Sackman have spent the summer helping to answer these questions. They have been catching the salamanders, taking samples and then testing their DNA in the lab. Bayer is a Howard Hughes Medical Institute Fellow; Sackman is a R.E. Lee Research Scholar.

Although this summer's work has been primarily in the lab, the students started their research catching the salamanders in the field during a spring term class on field biology, since salamanders are most active in the spring and easier to find. Easier is a relative term.

"We flipped over rocks, turned over lots of logs, and dug through leaf litter to try and find them," said Bayer. "Sometimes we would search for two or three hours and find only one or two salamanders."

The salamanders are small "” their bodies are about four centimeters long with their tails adding another two or three centimeters. So they're hard to spot in the first place. But it's also difficult to distinguish between the Sherando and Red Back salamanders. Marsh described the Red Back as "a little brown thing with a red stripe. It's by far the most common amphibian in the eastern United States and the two species look very similar at first glance. This is one reason new species are still being discovered."

But the new species does have some differences. For example, the limbs of the Sherando salamander tend to be longer and the trunk is shorter because they have fewer ribs. Measuring those characteristics helped the students identify the new species.

Once they caught the salamanders, the students pinched off a little bit of tissue from the tail to take back to the laboratory for analysis.

As Marsh explained, classifying the salamanders based on how they look is just preliminary. The main classification is accomplished by extracting and sequencing the DNA from the samples, then comparing the Sherandos and Red Backs.

"If all the Sherandos have one sequence and all the Red Backs have a different one, then we know we have two different species," said Marsh. "But if the two species actually have some DNA in common. then that would prove they are interbreeding where their habitats overlap."

But it's not that clear cut, added Bayer, saying that it depends on your definition of species.

"Some scientists say that if they interbreed at all and have fertile offspring then they are not a new species. Others say that even if they interbreed, as long as their DNA is different, then they are a different species," she said.

So what happens if the Sherando is determined to be a new species?

Marsh said that the salamanders are found mostly on land managed by the U.S. Forest Service, and added that the Forest Service is paying for a good chunk of this work, "because they are responsible for managing all the rare species on Forest Service land. If this turns out to be a new species, it will be one of the most spatially restricted species in North America (or "in the U.S." ). It will affect how the Forest Service manages these lands and may affect timber harvesting policy, mining and other things that go on in the area."

Marsh said the research has progressed well this summer, and the W&L team hopes to provide the Forest Service with a definitive answer on the Sherando salamander by the fall.

(Images available at http://www.wlu.edu/x34136.xml)

Sarah Tschiggfrie | Newswise Science News
Further information:
http://www.wlu.edu

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht Tiny Helpers that Clean Cells
14.08.2018 | Albert-Ludwigs-Universität Freiburg im Breisgau

nachricht Light-controlled molecules: Scientists develop new recycling strategy
14.08.2018 | Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Robots as 'pump attendants': TU Graz develops robot-controlled rapid charging system for e-vehicles

Researchers from TU Graz and their industry partners have unveiled a world first: the prototype of a robot-controlled, high-speed combined charging system (CCS) for electric vehicles that enables series charging of cars in various parking positions.

Global demand for electric vehicles is forecast to rise sharply: by 2025, the number of new vehicle registrations is expected to reach 25 million per year....

Im Focus: The “TRiC” to folding actin

Proteins must be folded correctly to fulfill their molecular functions in cells. Molecular assistants called chaperones help proteins exploit their inbuilt folding potential and reach the correct three-dimensional structure. Researchers at the Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry (MPIB) have demonstrated that actin, the most abundant protein in higher developed cells, does not have the inbuilt potential to fold and instead requires special assistance to fold into its active state. The chaperone TRiC uses a previously undescribed mechanism to perform actin folding. The study was recently published in the journal Cell.

Actin is the most abundant protein in highly developed cells and has diverse functions in processes like cell stabilization, cell division and muscle...

Im Focus: Lining up surprising behaviors of superconductor with one of the world's strongest magnets

Scientists have discovered that the electrical resistance of a copper-oxide compound depends on the magnetic field in a very unusual way -- a finding that could help direct the search for materials that can perfectly conduct electricity at room temperatur

What happens when really powerful magnets--capable of producing magnetic fields nearly two million times stronger than Earth's--are applied to materials that...

Im Focus: World record: Fastest 3-D tomographic images at BESSY II

The quality of materials often depends on the manufacturing process. In casting and welding, for example, the rate at which melts solidify and the resulting microstructure of the alloy is important. With metallic foams as well, it depends on exactly how the foaming process takes place. To understand these processes fully requires fast sensing capability. The fastest 3D tomographic images to date have now been achieved at the BESSY II X-ray source operated by the Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin.

Dr. Francisco Garcia-Moreno and his team have designed a turntable that rotates ultra-stably about its axis at a constant rotational speed. This really depends...

Im Focus: A molecular switch may serve as new target point for cancer and diabetes therapies

If certain signaling cascades are misregulated, diseases like cancer, obesity and diabetes may occur. A mechanism recently discovered by scientists at the Leibniz- Forschungsinstitut für Molekulare Pharmakologie (FMP) in Berlin and at the University of Geneva has a crucial influence on such signaling cascades and may be an important key for the future development of therapies against these diseases. The results of the study have just been published in the prestigious scientific journal 'Molecular Cell'.

Cell growth and cell differentiation as well as the release and efficacy of hormones such as insulin depend on the presence of lipids. Lipids are small...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

Within reach of the Universe

08.08.2018 | Event News

A journey through the history of microscopy – new exhibition opens at the MDC

27.07.2018 | Event News

2018 Work Research Conference

25.07.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Can radar replace stethoscopes?

14.08.2018 | Medical Engineering

The end-Cretaceous extinction unleashed modern shark diversity

14.08.2018 | Life Sciences

Light-controlled molecules: Scientists develop new recycling strategy

14.08.2018 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>