Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Mutations in the BRAF gene predict sensitivity to a novel class of cancer drugs

07.11.2005


A team of researchers led by scientists at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center have discovered that a new class of drugs -- now in early stage clinical trials -- work best in patients with mutations in the BRAF gene. BRAF is a protein that plays a central role in the growth and survival of cancer cells and is mutated in the majority of patients with melanoma and in a minority of patients with colon, breast, and lung cancers. The findings, available in an advance online publication of Nature, represent a potential targeted therapy tailored for patients whose tumors contain this mutation.



The researchers found that drugs that inhibit a protein called MEK selectively inhibited the growth of cancer cells lines and tumors that have a mutated BRAF gene. One of these drugs, PD0325901 (developed by Pfizer Research and Development), is now being tested in clinical trials of patients with melanoma, colon, breast, and lung cancers. In addition, by re-analyzing the data on more than 42,000 compounds tested by the National Cancer Institute against a panel of 60 cancer cell lines, the investigators were able to identify a small number of other compounds that also selectively inhibit tumors that have the BRAF mutation. While the mechanism of action of some of these compounds has yet to be determined, several of the most effective compounds were also inhibitors of the MEK protein.

"We find that all tumors with the BRAF mutation and some with the RAS mutation are sensitive to drugs that inhibit MEK," explained Dr. Neal Rosen, Professor of Medicine and a member and laboratory head in the Molecular Pharmacology and Chemistry Program at Memorial Sloan-Kettering and the study’s senior author. "Translating these findings into a strategy for treating patients whose tumors are dependent upon this specific genetic change is the next step, and such clinical trials are now ongoing."


"The BRAF mutation was first identified by a consortium of investigators searching for proteins that are frequently mutated in human cancer," said Dr. David Solit, the study’s first author and a medical oncologist at Memorial Sloan-Kettering who is also a member of Dr. Rosen’s laboratory. This project, an outgrowth of the Human Genome Project, called the Cancer Genome Project, has the goal of identifying the causative mutations that cause human cancers.

"This represents what we believe will be the first of a series of new drugs that specifically target cancer cells that contain mutations identified by the Cancer Genome sequencing effort," said Dr. Solit. "The hope is that these new targeted therapies will be more effective and less toxic than traditional chemotherapies."

The study’s other researchers were Christine A. Pratilas, Ayana Sawai, Andrea Basso, Qing Ye, Jose M. Lobo, and Yuhong She, all of Memorial Sloan-Kettering; Drs. Levi A.Galloway, Gad Getz, Todd R. Golub, and William R. Sellers of Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard; Dr. Iman Osman of New York University Medical College; and Dr. Judith Sebolt-Leopold of Pfizer Global Research and Development.

Joanne Nicholas | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.mskcc.org

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht Bioenergy cropland expansion could be as bad for biodiversity as climate change
11.12.2018 | Senckenberg Forschungsinstitut und Naturmuseen

nachricht How glial cells develop in the brain from neural precursor cells
11.12.2018 | Universitätsmedizin der Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Topological material switched off and on for the first time

Key advance for future topological transistors

Over the last decade, there has been much excitement about the discovery, recognised by the Nobel Prize in Physics only two years ago, that there are two types...

Im Focus: Researchers develop method to transfer entire 2D circuits to any smooth surface

What if a sensor sensing a thing could be part of the thing itself? Rice University engineers believe they have a two-dimensional solution to do just that.

Rice engineers led by materials scientists Pulickel Ajayan and Jun Lou have developed a method to make atom-flat sensors that seamlessly integrate with devices...

Im Focus: Three components on one chip

Scientists at the University of Stuttgart and the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) succeed in important further development on the way to quantum Computers.

Quantum computers one day should be able to solve certain computing problems much faster than a classical computer. One of the most promising approaches is...

Im Focus: Substitute for rare earth metal oxides

New Project SNAPSTER: Novel luminescent materials by encapsulating phosphorescent metal clusters with organic liquid crystals

Nowadays energy conversion in lighting and optoelectronic devices requires the use of rare earth oxides.

Im Focus: A bit of a stretch... material that thickens as it's pulled

Scientists have discovered the first synthetic material that becomes thicker - at the molecular level - as it is stretched.

Researchers led by Dr Devesh Mistry from the University of Leeds discovered a new non-porous material that has unique and inherent "auxetic" stretching...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

New Plastics Economy Investor Forum - Meeting Point for Innovations

10.12.2018 | Event News

EGU 2019 meeting: Media registration now open

06.12.2018 | Event News

Expert Panel on the Future of HPC in Engineering

03.12.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Electronic evidence of non-Fermi liquid behaviors in an iron-based superconductor

11.12.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

Topological material switched off and on for the first time

11.12.2018 | Materials Sciences

NIST's antenna evaluation method could help boost 5G network capacity and cut costs

11.12.2018 | Information Technology

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>