Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

The hormone ethylene is necessary for plant resistance

21.03.2003


Dutch phytopathologists have shown that ethylene is vital for the protection of plants against bacteria and fungi. This is another function for the plant hormone already known to play a role in plant aging and fruit ripening.



Bart Geraats from Utrecht University demonstrated that plants which are insensitive for the hormone ethylene are hypersensitive to various microorganisms. The research implies that farmers and horticulturalists must be careful with substances that inhibit the effect of ethylene. Such substances could increase the susceptibility of plants to pathogens.

The researchers produced modified tobacco plants which were insensitive to ethylene. These plants were spontaneously diseased and wilted when grown in ordinary compost. Various fungi and fungi-like microorganisms in the compost attacked the ethylene-insensitive tobacco. These microorganisms do not usually cause diseases in unmodified plants.


Furthermore, various tobacco pathogens caused considerably more damage in the modified than in the unmodified tobacco plants.

This showed that plants must be able to detect ethylene in order to protect themselves against infections caused by various microorganisms.

Efforts to make the ethylene-insensitive plants more resistant were not successful. The administration of chemical substances which normally activate disease resistance in plants provided no increased resistance to the microorganisms in the compost. Treating the roots with harmless or even ’healthy’ bacteria gave no protection either. These bacteria should have competed with the pathogenic microorganisms or could even have increased the disease resistance of the plants.

Ethylene therefore appears to play a key role in activating the resistance mechanism against infectious microorganisms.

For further information please contact Bart Geraats (Department of Phytopathology, Utrecht University), tel. +31 (0)30 2536857, fax +31 (0)30 2518366, e-mail: b.p.j.geraats@bio.uu.nl. The doctoral thesis will be defended on 17 March 2003. Mr Geraats’ supervisor is Prof L.C. van Loon.

Nalinie Moerlie | alfa
Further information:
http://www.nwo.nl/news

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht Scientists propose new theory on Alzheimer's, amyloid connection
23.04.2019 | Florida Atlantic University

nachricht Research on TGN1412 – Fc:Fcγ receptor interaction: Strong binding does not mean strong effect
23.04.2019 | Paul-Ehrlich-Institut - Bundesinstitut für Impfstoffe und biomedizinische Arzneimittel

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Quantum gas turns supersolid

Researchers led by Francesca Ferlaino from the University of Innsbruck and the Austrian Academy of Sciences report in Physical Review X on the observation of supersolid behavior in dipolar quantum gases of erbium and dysprosium. In the dysprosium gas these properties are unprecedentedly long-lived. This sets the stage for future investigations into the nature of this exotic phase of matter.

Supersolidity is a paradoxical state where the matter is both crystallized and superfluid. Predicted 50 years ago, such a counter-intuitive phase, featuring...

Im Focus: Explosion on Jupiter-sized star 10 times more powerful than ever seen on our sun

A stellar flare 10 times more powerful than anything seen on our sun has burst from an ultracool star almost the same size as Jupiter

  • Coolest and smallest star to produce a superflare found
  • Star is a tenth of the radius of our Sun
  • Researchers led by University of Warwick could only see...

Im Focus: Quantum simulation more stable than expected

A localization phenomenon boosts the accuracy of solving quantum many-body problems with quantum computers which are otherwise challenging for conventional computers. This brings such digital quantum simulation within reach on quantum devices available today.

Quantum computers promise to solve certain computational problems exponentially faster than any classical machine. “A particularly promising application is the...

Im Focus: Largest, fastest array of microscopic 'traffic cops' for optical communications

The technology could revolutionize how information travels through data centers and artificial intelligence networks

Engineers at the University of California, Berkeley have built a new photonic switch that can control the direction of light passing through optical fibers...

Im Focus: A long-distance relationship in femtoseconds

Physicists observe how electron-hole pairs drift apart at ultrafast speed, but still remain strongly bound.

Modern electronics relies on ultrafast charge motion on ever shorter length scales. Physicists from Regensburg and Gothenburg have now succeeded in resolving a...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

Revered mathematicians and computer scientists converge with 200 young researchers in Heidelberg!

17.04.2019 | Event News

First dust conference in the Central Asian part of the earth’s dust belt

15.04.2019 | Event News

Fraunhofer FHR at the IEEE Radar Conference 2019 in Boston, USA

09.04.2019 | Event News

 
Latest News

New automated biological-sample analysis systems to accelerate disease detection

18.04.2019 | Life Sciences

Explosion on Jupiter-sized star 10 times more powerful than ever seen on our sun

18.04.2019 | Physics and Astronomy

New eDNA technology used to quickly assess coral reefs

18.04.2019 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>