Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Perlegen scientists find genetic basis for difference between humans and non-human primates

04.03.2003


Genomic rearrangements discovered using DNA microarrays are expected to reveal genetic regions important to human health



Mountain View, CA ¾ March 3, 2003 ¾ Perlegen Sciences, Inc. today announced the publication of a scientific paper in the latest issue of the peer-reviewed journal Genome Research. The paper, “Genomic DNA insertions and deletions occur frequently between humans and nonhuman primates,” describes novel findings suggesting that genomic rearrangements, not single base pair changes in DNA, provide the genetic basis for the differences between humans and non-human primates such as the chimpanzee.

“This is a very surprising and important discovery of the fundamental basis of structural genomic differences between humans and other primates,” said David Cox, M.D., Ph.D, Perlegen’s Chief Scientific Officer. “It provides a valuable starting point from which to improve our understanding of what makes human beings unique.”


Analysis of the differences in sequence between human and chimpanzee DNA has previously established that the two species are approximately 98.5% identical. For this reason, it is widely accepted that qualitative and quantitative differences in gene expression are responsible for the major biological differences among humans, chimpanzees and other non-human primates. To date it has been commonly thought that single base pair changes in these genomes, not larger DNA rearrangements, would underlie the majority of these postulated genomic regulatory differences.

“Comparative genome analysis of human and non-human primates is a useful technique for deciphering the function of specific genomic regions,” commented Kelly Frazer, Ph.D., Senior Director of Genomic Biology at Perlegen and the lead author on the paper. “This study illustrates the power and versatility of Perlegen’s high-density array technology in the detection of DNA rearrangements.”

Comparison of human chromosome 21 with chimpanzee, orangutan, rhesus macaque, and woolly monkey DNA sequences identified a significant number of random genomic rearrangements between human and nonhuman primate DNA. This evidence shows, contrary to popular belief, that genomic rearrangements have occurred frequently during primate genome evolution and are a significant source of variation between humans and chimpanzees as well as other primates. These DNA rearrangements are commonly found in segments containing genes, suggesting possible functional consequences and therefore provide natural starting points for focused investigations of variations in gene expression between humans and other primates, including variations which may provide important clues in researching human health and disease.

Perlegen conducts genetics research and develops products that impact and improve people’s lives through a proprietary, cost-effective method for rapidly analyzing and comparing entire genomes. This whole genome association study capability enables Perlegen to identify genes that work in concert to cause common diseases and affect the body’s response to drugs. Perlegen has ongoing research collaborations with partners including Bristol-Myers Squibb, Eli Lilly & Co., GlaxoSmithKline, Pfizer and Unilever.



About Perlegen Sciences
Formed in late 2000 as a spin-off of Affymetrix, Inc. (Nasdaq: AFFX), Perlegen is accelerating the development of therapeutics and diagnostics and enabling a new paradigm of high-resolution whole genome scanning. For more information about Perlegen and its technologies, visit Perlegen’s web site at www.perlegen.com. Perlegen is a trademark of Perlegen Sciences, Inc.

Ana Kapor | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.noonanrusso.com/

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht Russian scientists show changes in the erythrocyte nanostructure under stress
22.02.2019 | Lobachevsky University

nachricht How the intestinal fungus Candida albicans shapes our immune system
22.02.2019 | Exzellenzcluster Präzisionsmedizin für chronische Entzündungserkrankungen

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: (Re)solving the jet/cocoon riddle of a gravitational wave event

An international research team including astronomers from the Max Planck Institute for Radio Astronomy in Bonn, Germany, has combined radio telescopes from five continents to prove the existence of a narrow stream of material, a so-called jet, emerging from the only gravitational wave event involving two neutron stars observed so far. With its high sensitivity and excellent performance, the 100-m radio telescope in Effelsberg played an important role in the observations.

In August 2017, two neutron stars were observed colliding, producing gravitational waves that were detected by the American LIGO and European Virgo detectors....

Im Focus: Light from a roll – hybrid OLED creates innovative and functional luminous surfaces

Up to now, OLEDs have been used exclusively as a novel lighting technology for use in luminaires and lamps. However, flexible organic technology can offer much more: as an active lighting surface, it can be combined with a wide variety of materials, not just to modify but to revolutionize the functionality and design of countless existing products. To exemplify this, the Fraunhofer FEP together with the company EMDE development of light GmbH will be presenting hybrid flexible OLEDs integrated into textile designs within the EU-funded project PI-SCALE for the first time at LOPEC (March 19-21, 2019 in Munich, Germany) as examples of some of the many possible applications.

The Fraunhofer FEP, a provider of research and development services in the field of organic electronics, has long been involved in the development of...

Im Focus: Regensburg physicists watch electron transfer in a single molecule

For the first time, an international team of scientists based in Regensburg, Germany, has recorded the orbitals of single molecules in different charge states in a novel type of microscopy. The research findings are published under the title “Mapping orbital changes upon electron transfer with tunneling microscopy on insulators” in the prestigious journal “Nature”.

The building blocks of matter surrounding us are atoms and molecules. The properties of that matter, however, are often not set by these building blocks...

Im Focus: University of Konstanz gains new insights into the recent development of the human immune system

Scientists at the University of Konstanz identify fierce competition between the human immune system and bacterial pathogens

Cell biologists from the University of Konstanz shed light on a recent evolutionary process in the human immune system and publish their findings in the...

Im Focus: Transformation through Light

Laser physicists have taken snapshots of carbon molecules C₆₀ showing how they transform in intense infrared light

When carbon molecules C₆₀ are exposed to an intense infrared light, they change their ball-like structure to a more elongated version. This has now been...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

Global Legal Hackathon at HAW Hamburg

11.02.2019 | Event News

The world of quantum chemistry meets in Heidelberg

30.01.2019 | Event News

Our digital society in 2040

16.01.2019 | Event News

 
Latest News

JILA researchers make coldest quantum gas of molecules

22.02.2019 | Physics and Astronomy

Understanding high efficiency of deep ultraviolet LEDs

22.02.2019 | Materials Sciences

Russian scientists show changes in the erythrocyte nanostructure under stress

22.02.2019 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>