Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Is being big clam on the block a factor in species success?

25.10.2002


Body size is one of the most important biological characteristics in the study of organisms, telling a researcher a lot about how a particular animal lives and interacts with it’s environment and with other species. Despite this importance, there has been little study of body size trends of ancient life.



Now, using marine life forms as models, three Virginia Tech doctoral students in geological sciences have launched a long-term research project to see what can be learned about life across millions of years. At the Geological Society of America’s 114th annual meeting in Denver, Oct. 27-30, Richard Krause Jr. will present early findings from his, Jennifer Stempien’s, and Susan Barbour Wood’s work.

So far, findings suggest that body size may not be directly related to evolutionary or ecological success.


The trio focused initially on bivalves and brachiopods. Bivalves, which include clams, mussels, and scallops, and brachiopods, which appear similar to clams but have a fundamentally different anatomy, are easily compared because "there is a really good fossil record for both groups," says Krause.

The scope of the project is huge. The researchers want to measure what has happened all over the world and over millions of years. "Obviously we can’t go out and collect fossils from each age and area," says Krause. So they are using photographs that accompany published research. This way they can look at and measure shells from many different time periods all over the world.

The research is already yielding some promising results. The students report that early in the history of life, size of the organisms from these groups was increasing along with diversity, which has not been previously documented. "Most interesting, as diversity begins to drop at the end of the Ordovician period, during a major extinction interval (440 million years ago), the overall size of the organisms of both groups was unchanged. The extinction itself wasn’t size selective," says Krause.

Another interesting point that Krause will focus on at the GSA meeting is the changing places of bivalves and brachiopods. "What we are finding is that from the early Ordovician to the Silurian, or between 500 million and 400 million years ago, bivalves were considerably bigger than brachiopods," says Krause. This is very similar to the present-day situation for these groups. Bivalves living in the oceans today are, on average, significantly larger than modern brachiopods.

But, while their size differences haven’t changed much, these groups have done a major switch ecologically over the last 400 million years. Brachiopods were very diverse and successful in the Ordovician and Silurian, while bivalves were somewhat rare in many environments. The situation is exactly reversed in modern oceans, says Krause.

"This seems to say that diversity and evolutionary success may not have anything to do with how big an organism is. In this case, the culprit is likely the fact that bivalves’ metabolism is higher. They are more active. That may be what is controlling size, rather than environment," says Krause. "The fact that this size difference seems to have not changed in the last 400 million years despite major ecological changes is really interesting, and a bit unexpected."

Krause will present the paper, "Differences in size of early Paleozoic bivalves and brachiopods: The influence of intrinsic and extrinsic factors on body size evolution," at 9:15 a.m. on Sunday, Oct. 27 in Room A108/110 at the Colorado Convention Center. Co-authors are Stempien, Virginia Tech geological sciences professor Michal Kowalewski, and Arnold I. Miller at the University of Cincinnati.


Contact information: Richard Krause. rkrause@vt.edu. 540-231-1840

Richard Krause’s major professor is Michal Kowalewski.

PR Contact: Susan Trulove, strulove@vt.edu, 540-231-5646.

Richard Krause | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.technews.vt.edu/

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht Scientists uncover the role of a protein in production & survival of myelin-forming cells
19.07.2018 | Advanced Science Research Center, GC/CUNY

nachricht NYSCF researchers develop novel bioengineering technique for personalized bone grafts
18.07.2018 | New York Stem Cell Foundation

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Future electronic components to be printed like newspapers

A new manufacturing technique uses a process similar to newspaper printing to form smoother and more flexible metals for making ultrafast electronic devices.

The low-cost process, developed by Purdue University researchers, combines tools already used in industry for manufacturing metals on a large scale, but uses...

Im Focus: First evidence on the source of extragalactic particles

For the first time ever, scientists have determined the cosmic origin of highest-energy neutrinos. A research group led by IceCube scientist Elisa Resconi, spokesperson of the Collaborative Research Center SFB1258 at the Technical University of Munich (TUM), provides an important piece of evidence that the particles detected by the IceCube neutrino telescope at the South Pole originate from a galaxy four billion light-years away from Earth.

To rule out other origins with certainty, the team led by neutrino physicist Elisa Resconi from the Technical University of Munich and multi-wavelength...

Im Focus: Magnetic vortices: Two independent magnetic skyrmion phases discovered in a single material

For the first time a team of researchers have discovered two different phases of magnetic skyrmions in a single material. Physicists of the Technical Universities of Munich and Dresden and the University of Cologne can now better study and understand the properties of these magnetic structures, which are important for both basic research and applications.

Whirlpools are an everyday experience in a bath tub: When the water is drained a circular vortex is formed. Typically, such whirls are rather stable. Similar...

Im Focus: Breaking the bond: To take part or not?

Physicists working with Roland Wester at the University of Innsbruck have investigated if and how chemical reactions can be influenced by targeted vibrational excitation of the reactants. They were able to demonstrate that excitation with a laser beam does not affect the efficiency of a chemical exchange reaction and that the excited molecular group acts only as a spectator in the reaction.

A frequently used reaction in organic chemistry is nucleophilic substitution. It plays, for example, an important role in in the synthesis of new chemical...

Im Focus: New 2D Spectroscopy Methods

Optical spectroscopy allows investigating the energy structure and dynamic properties of complex quantum systems. Researchers from the University of Würzburg present two new approaches of coherent two-dimensional spectroscopy.

"Put an excitation into the system and observe how it evolves." According to physicist Professor Tobias Brixner, this is the credo of optical spectroscopy....

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

Leading experts in Diabetes, Metabolism and Biomedical Engineering discuss Precision Medicine

13.07.2018 | Event News

Conference on Laser Polishing – LaP: Fine Tuning for Surfaces

12.07.2018 | Event News

11th European Wood-based Panel Symposium 2018: Meeting point for the wood-based materials industry

03.07.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

A smart safe rechargeable zinc ion battery based on sol-gel transition electrolytes

20.07.2018 | Power and Electrical Engineering

Reversing cause and effect is no trouble for quantum computers

20.07.2018 | Information Technology

Princeton-UPenn research team finds physics treasure hidden in a wallpaper pattern

20.07.2018 | Materials Sciences

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>