Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Boroles get a stability boost

06.08.2015

Boroles could be a highly interesting class of materials for practical use in photovoltaic or LED applications – if it weren't for the molecules' extreme instability. Chemists from Würzburg have now discovered a powerful stabiliser.

Boroles are boron containing molecules that have great electron-accepting ability. This makes them excellently suited for materials that could bring further improvements to photovoltaics or OLEDs. But so far, boroles have had one major drawback: They are highly unstable and decay virtually immediately when in contact with water or oxygen.


Fluoromesityl groups boost the stability of boroles. F stands for fluorine, B for boron and C for carbon.

(Picture: Todd Marder)

Chemists at the University of Würzburg have now made an important step forward: Todd Marder and fellow chemists at the Institute of Inorganic Chemistry have significantly stabilised borole molecules by adding a so-called fluoromesityl group, which makes the highly sensitive boroles about 600 times more resistant to water. As a result, the molecules are stable for ten to twelve hours compared to just one minute without the stabilising group. Their electron-accepting ability is fully preserved.

Now the new molecules' robustness will be verified in further tests. The fluoromesityl boroles have proved to be heat resistant and easily vapourable. Therefore, the Würzburg chemists are now eager to investigate whether the novel boroles can be vapour deposited on substrates in wafer-thin films. This would be a major prerequisite for technological applications. Moreover, the scientists are looking for other molecule groups that might stabilise boroles even more efficiently.

“Taming the beast: fluoromesityl groups induce a dramatic stability enhancement in boroles”, Zuolun Zhang, Robert M. Edkins, Martin Haehnel, Marius Wehner, Antonius Eichhorn, Lisa Mailänder, Michael Meier, Johannes Brand, Franziska Brede, Klaus Müller-Buschbaum, Holger Braunschweig, and Todd B. Marder. Chemical Science, published online 13 July 2015, DOI: 10.1039/C5SC02205C

Great collaborative spirit

Todd Marder's team with the work groups of Holger Braunschweig and Klaus Müller-Buschbaum has published the results in the magazine "Chemical Science". Marder emphasises that the joint research of boroles is characterised by a great collaborative spirit which is generally true for the atmosphere at the Würzburg department. The US chemist has researched and taught in Würzburg since 2012. In the 15 years before, he had been head of department at Durham University in England.

An excellent global network

He also points out that the Würzburg Department of Chemistry has an excellent global network: "Everyone here is committed to getting top-class international scientists to work in Würzburg." The Humboldt Foundation supports this goal by awarding generous grants to postdocs. The two initial authors of the publication in "Chemical Science", Zuolun Zhang from China and Robert M. Edkins from the UK, also arrived in Würzburg with a Humboldt scholarship in their pockets.

Comment for "Science" magazine

Shubhankar Kumar Bose from India joined the University of Würzburg as a Humboldt scholar and stayed there as a postdoc. Only recently did he and Todd Marder author a comment for "Science" magazine: As experts in boron chemistry and boron catalysis, the two scientists had been invited by the leading magazine to assess the work of a Canadian chemist ("A leap ahead for activating C-H bonds", 31 July 2015, Science Vol. 349 Issue 6247, p 473-474). This is another example of the international renown of the Würzburg Department of Chemistry

Top result in Shanghai Ranking

Accordingly, the Department of Chemistry has achieved good ranking results in the renowned Shanghai Ranking ("Academic Ranking of Universities Worldwide") of Jiao-Tong University for many years. In 2014, they ranked 30th among the more than 1,200 universities that were assessed which corresponds to rank two in the Germany-wide comparison. The Shanghai Ranking evaluates the research performance of universities according to various parameters.

Contact

Prof. Dr. Todd Marder, Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, University of Würzburg, Phone +49 931 31-85514, todd.marder@uni-wuerzburg.de

Robert Emmerich | idw - Informationsdienst Wissenschaft
Further information:
http://www.uni-wuerzburg.de

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht Scientists uncover the role of a protein in production & survival of myelin-forming cells
19.07.2018 | Advanced Science Research Center, GC/CUNY

nachricht NYSCF researchers develop novel bioengineering technique for personalized bone grafts
18.07.2018 | New York Stem Cell Foundation

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Future electronic components to be printed like newspapers

A new manufacturing technique uses a process similar to newspaper printing to form smoother and more flexible metals for making ultrafast electronic devices.

The low-cost process, developed by Purdue University researchers, combines tools already used in industry for manufacturing metals on a large scale, but uses...

Im Focus: First evidence on the source of extragalactic particles

For the first time ever, scientists have determined the cosmic origin of highest-energy neutrinos. A research group led by IceCube scientist Elisa Resconi, spokesperson of the Collaborative Research Center SFB1258 at the Technical University of Munich (TUM), provides an important piece of evidence that the particles detected by the IceCube neutrino telescope at the South Pole originate from a galaxy four billion light-years away from Earth.

To rule out other origins with certainty, the team led by neutrino physicist Elisa Resconi from the Technical University of Munich and multi-wavelength...

Im Focus: Magnetic vortices: Two independent magnetic skyrmion phases discovered in a single material

For the first time a team of researchers have discovered two different phases of magnetic skyrmions in a single material. Physicists of the Technical Universities of Munich and Dresden and the University of Cologne can now better study and understand the properties of these magnetic structures, which are important for both basic research and applications.

Whirlpools are an everyday experience in a bath tub: When the water is drained a circular vortex is formed. Typically, such whirls are rather stable. Similar...

Im Focus: Breaking the bond: To take part or not?

Physicists working with Roland Wester at the University of Innsbruck have investigated if and how chemical reactions can be influenced by targeted vibrational excitation of the reactants. They were able to demonstrate that excitation with a laser beam does not affect the efficiency of a chemical exchange reaction and that the excited molecular group acts only as a spectator in the reaction.

A frequently used reaction in organic chemistry is nucleophilic substitution. It plays, for example, an important role in in the synthesis of new chemical...

Im Focus: New 2D Spectroscopy Methods

Optical spectroscopy allows investigating the energy structure and dynamic properties of complex quantum systems. Researchers from the University of Würzburg present two new approaches of coherent two-dimensional spectroscopy.

"Put an excitation into the system and observe how it evolves." According to physicist Professor Tobias Brixner, this is the credo of optical spectroscopy....

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

Leading experts in Diabetes, Metabolism and Biomedical Engineering discuss Precision Medicine

13.07.2018 | Event News

Conference on Laser Polishing – LaP: Fine Tuning for Surfaces

12.07.2018 | Event News

11th European Wood-based Panel Symposium 2018: Meeting point for the wood-based materials industry

03.07.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

A smart safe rechargeable zinc ion battery based on sol-gel transition electrolytes

20.07.2018 | Power and Electrical Engineering

Reversing cause and effect is no trouble for quantum computers

20.07.2018 | Information Technology

Princeton-UPenn research team finds physics treasure hidden in a wallpaper pattern

20.07.2018 | Materials Sciences

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>