Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Blocking tumor-associated macrophages decreased glioblastoma's growth & extended survival in mice

16.12.2013
Rates of programmed cell death higher in mice treated with experimental drug than in untreated animals with same cancer

An experimental drug that targets macrophages, a type of immune cells, in the microenvironment surrounding the lethal brain tumor glioblastoma multiforme decreased the cancer's growth and extended survival of laboratory mice with the cancer, scientists will report on Tuesday Dec. 17, at the American Society for Cell Biology (ASCB) annual meeting in New Orleans.

The rates of apoptosis, or programmed cell death, were higher in the mice treated with the experimental agent than in the untreated animals that also had high-grade glioblastomas, said Johanna Joyce, Ph.D., of the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC) in New York City. As a result, the drug-treated laboratory mice survived many months longer than the untreated animals with the same cancer.

The experimental drug blocks cell receptors for colony-stimulating factor-1 (CSF-1R), which is essential to the differentiation and survival of tumor-associated macrophages and microglia (TAMS), which are the brain's front-line immune defense cells. The microenvironment that surrounds brain tumors contains many macrophages with this receptor.

Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common and the most deadly adult primary brain tumor, with an average survival of just 14 months following diagnosis. Even with aggressive treatment by surgery, radiation and chemotherapy, most therapeutic approaches targeting the glioma cells in GBM fail.

Faced with this bleak picture, Dr. Joyce and colleagues MSKCC looked for an alternative strategy and turned to the cancer's cellular neighbors, the non-tumor cells that are part of the glioma microenvironment. In particular, they zeroed in on tumor-associated macrophages and TAMs.

When Dr. Joyce's lab used an inhibitor of the CSF-1 receptor (CSF-1R) to target TAMs in a mouse model of GBM, the treated mice survived many months longer than the control cohort. Their established, high-grade gliomas regressed in proliferation and malignancy, even though the glioma cells themselves were not the targets of the CSF-1R treatment.

With the TAMs blockaded by CSF-1 inhibitors, it was the tumor cells that showed increased rates of apoptosis. The TAMs were not even depleted in the treated mice, despite the drug blockade of their growth factor. Instead the TAMs survived by responding to growth factors secreted by the gliomas, including GM-CSF and IFN-ã, according to Dr. Joyce.

The MSKCC researchers also found that tumor spheres, freshly isolated from glioma patients in the surgery department at MSKCC, responded to the drug when implanted in animals. The CSF-1R blockade slowed intracranial growth in the patient-derived glioma xenografts.

Because GBM is the most common glioma, its genome was the first to be sequenced for the Cancer Genome Atlas, which parsed GBM into four genetic subtypes: proneural, neural, classical and mesenchymal. The mice used in Dr. Joyce's lab experiments model the proneural GBM subtype. All forms of GBM have a 2- to 3-person per 100,000 incidence rate in the U.S. and Europe, according to the National Brain Tumor Society. Because of its highly invasive phenotype, GBM is almost impossible to resect completely in surgery. Drug and radiation treatments are the standard follow-ups.

Dr. Joyce says that these new results, which were first reported only two months ago in Nature Medicine, http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24056773, are encouraging for planned clinical trials of CSF-1R inhibitors in combination with radiation therapy in glioma patients.

"We are optimistic that CSF-1R inhibitors may provide a more effective therapy than current treatments for the disease management of glioma patients," Dr. Joyce said.

CONTACT:

Johanna Joyce, Ph.D.
Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center
New York, NY
646-888-2048
JoyceJ@mskcc.org
ASCB PRESS CONTACTS:
John Fleischman
jfleischman@ascb.org
513-706-0212
Cathy Yarbrough
Cyarbrough@ascb.org
858-243-1814
Author will present, "CSF-1R inhibition alters macrophage polarization and blocks glioma progression," Tuesday, Dec. 17, during the 3:50 to 4:10 p.m. mini-symposium titled, "Tumor Microenvironment as a Driver and Target in Cancer Progression."

Cathy Yarbrough | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.ascb.org

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht Magic number colloidal clusters
13.12.2018 | Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg

nachricht Record levels of mercury released by thawing permafrost in Canadian Arctic
13.12.2018 | University of Alberta

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: An energy-efficient way to stay warm: Sew high-tech heating patches to your clothes

Personal patches could reduce energy waste in buildings, Rutgers-led study says

What if, instead of turning up the thermostat, you could warm up with high-tech, flexible patches sewn into your clothes - while significantly reducing your...

Im Focus: Lethal combination: Drug cocktail turns off the juice to cancer cells

A widely used diabetes medication combined with an antihypertensive drug specifically inhibits tumor growth – this was discovered by researchers from the University of Basel’s Biozentrum two years ago. In a follow-up study, recently published in “Cell Reports”, the scientists report that this drug cocktail induces cancer cell death by switching off their energy supply.

The widely used anti-diabetes drug metformin not only reduces blood sugar but also has an anti-cancer effect. However, the metformin dose commonly used in the...

Im Focus: New Foldable Drone Flies through Narrow Holes in Rescue Missions

A research team from the University of Zurich has developed a new drone that can retract its propeller arms in flight and make itself small to fit through narrow gaps and holes. This is particularly useful when searching for victims of natural disasters.

Inspecting a damaged building after an earthquake or during a fire is exactly the kind of job that human rescuers would like drones to do for them. A flying...

Im Focus: Topological material switched off and on for the first time

Key advance for future topological transistors

Over the last decade, there has been much excitement about the discovery, recognised by the Nobel Prize in Physics only two years ago, that there are two types...

Im Focus: Researchers develop method to transfer entire 2D circuits to any smooth surface

What if a sensor sensing a thing could be part of the thing itself? Rice University engineers believe they have a two-dimensional solution to do just that.

Rice engineers led by materials scientists Pulickel Ajayan and Jun Lou have developed a method to make atom-flat sensors that seamlessly integrate with devices...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

ICTM Conference 2019: Digitization emerges as an engineering trend for turbomachinery construction

12.12.2018 | Event News

New Plastics Economy Investor Forum - Meeting Point for Innovations

10.12.2018 | Event News

EGU 2019 meeting: Media registration now open

06.12.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Magic number colloidal clusters

13.12.2018 | Life Sciences

UNLV study unlocks clues to how planets form

13.12.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

Live from the ocean research vessel Atlantis

13.12.2018 | Earth Sciences

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>