Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

New supercomputer brings unique opportunities for Swedish brain research

21.02.2007
Approximately 127 million people in Europe are suffering from some kind of brain disease or injury. With the long term goal to improve diagnostics and find new therapies in their sights, the Stockholm Brain Institute (SBI) and IBM have embarked on a partnership that gives Swedish brain researchers access to a unique supercomputer.

The computer system – Blue Gene – is the first of its kind in the Nordic region and will be installed in the Parallel Computer Centre at the Royal Institute of Technology. The joint project, which will cost an estimated SKr 20 million, was presented today at a press conference in Stockholm.

“The combination of such enormous computer capacity and a high-resolution PET camera is unique in the world,” says Hans Forssberg, Vice President of Karolinska Institutet and representative of the SBI. “Add to this the proximity to patients and clinical practice and we get entirely new opportunities for brain research from both a Swedish and international perspective.”

The SBI was set up by Karolinska Institutet, the Royal Institute of Technology and Stockholm University to promote cutting-edge research into the cognitive functions of the brain, such as memory and learning or emotions, action and perception. Such research is attacked from three angles: development and ageing, gender differences, and brain diseases (Alzheimer’s, schizophrenia or ADHD). Important tools for scientists working on these areas include high-performance computational resources for simulation and image analysis.

The SBI was also established to team up with industry to drive the development of innovation projects concerning medicines, advanced computer technology, memory research, medical image processing, and the rehabilitation of people with brain injuries.

“The purpose of Blue Gene will be to give scientists extreme computational power to help them develop a deeper understanding of brain function so that they can improve the diagnosis and treatment of diseases of the nerve system and the brain,” says Ajay Royyuru, head of the Computational Biology Centre at IBM Research. “Blue Gene has established itself as the world’s leading supercomputer architecture, and suits the needs of the SBI down to the ground.”

“We’re also creating two new research posts – one at IBM Research outside New York and one at the SBI in Stockholm,” he continues. “These researchers will be developing new algorithms and methods for making better use of Blue Gene’s capacity.”

Also involved in the Blue Gene project are Astra Zeneca and the OECD’s International Neuroinformatics Coordination Facility (INCF).

Katarina Sternudd | alfa
Further information:
http://www.ki.se

More articles from Information Technology:

nachricht CiViQ brings quantum technologies to the telecommunications arena
21.11.2018 | Fraunhofer-Institut für Nachrichtentechnik, Heinrich-Hertz-Institut, HHI

nachricht Earthquake researchers finalists for supercomputing prize
19.11.2018 | University of Tokyo

All articles from Information Technology >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Nonstop Tranport of Cargo in Nanomachines

Max Planck researchers revel the nano-structure of molecular trains and the reason for smooth transport in cellular antennas.

Moving around, sensing the extracellular environment, and signaling to other cells are important for a cell to function properly. Responsible for those tasks...

Im Focus: UNH scientists help provide first-ever views of elusive energy explosion

Researchers at the University of New Hampshire have captured a difficult-to-view singular event involving "magnetic reconnection"--the process by which sparse particles and energy around Earth collide producing a quick but mighty explosion--in the Earth's magnetotail, the magnetic environment that trails behind the planet.

Magnetic reconnection has remained a bit of a mystery to scientists. They know it exists and have documented the effects that the energy explosions can...

Im Focus: A Chip with Blood Vessels

Biochips have been developed at TU Wien (Vienna), on which tissue can be produced and examined. This allows supplying the tissue with different substances in a very controlled way.

Cultivating human cells in the Petri dish is not a big challenge today. Producing artificial tissue, however, permeated by fine blood vessels, is a much more...

Im Focus: A Leap Into Quantum Technology

Faster and secure data communication: This is the goal of a new joint project involving physicists from the University of Würzburg. The German Federal Ministry of Education and Research funds the project with 14.8 million euro.

In our digital world data security and secure communication are becoming more and more important. Quantum communication is a promising approach to achieve...

Im Focus: Research icebreaker Polarstern begins the Antarctic season

What does it look like below the ice shelf of the calved massive iceberg A68?

On Saturday, 10 November 2018, the research icebreaker Polarstern will leave its homeport of Bremerhaven, bound for Cape Town, South Africa.

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

Optical Coherence Tomography: German-Japanese Research Alliance hosted Medical Imaging Conference

19.11.2018 | Event News

“3rd Conference on Laser Polishing – LaP 2018” Attracts International Experts and Users

09.11.2018 | Event News

On the brain’s ability to find the right direction

06.11.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Sustainable energy supply in developing and emerging countries: What are the needs?

21.11.2018 | Power and Electrical Engineering

Nonstop Tranport of Cargo in Nanomachines

20.11.2018 | Life Sciences

Researchers find social cultures in chimpanzees

20.11.2018 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>