Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

New transistor makes brighter future for display screens

03.07.2003


Researchers from Myongji University, Korea, have developed a way to improve liquid crystal displays (LCD), which could revolutionise display technology. Published today in the Institute of Physics journal Semiconductor Science and Technology, Professor Yong-Sang Kim and his team propose a new structure for polycrystalline silicon thin film transistors (poly-Si TFT), which makes them more reliable when used in active matrix liquid crystal displays (AMLCD), like those on lap top screens and television screens.



An AMLCD has a transistor for each pixel on the screen, which can be switched on or off. Currently, most AMLCDs use amorphous-silicon (a-Si) transistors. Poly-Si TFTs, however, have several advantages over a-Si TFTs, as they are thinner, lighter and can make higher resolution displays. The down side is that when applying poly-Si TFTs to AMLCDs, they leak much more current than the a-Si TFTs. A high leakage current can cause the colour and brightness of the image to change, rather than stay constant.

Previous methods of minimising the leakage current have led to a reduction of the ‘on-state’ current (which is the current flowing through the circuit when the transistor is switched on). This leads to a flickering screen, and reduces the performance of other parts of the circuit. Professor Kim’s goal has been to lower the leakage current without sacrificing the on-state current. The results published today show that using his new gate insulator structure in the poly-Si TFTs, he reduced the leakage current by three orders of magnitude, with no loss to the on-state current.


Professor Kim said:
“Using our new transistor structure in active matrix liquid crystal displays be an improvement on what you see on television screens and laptops today. They would be more reliable, and could produce a better picture quality because the transistors – and therefore the pixels – can be miniaturised.”

The new transistors make the displays more reliable as their crystalline structure allows them handle more information than the conventional amorphous transistors. So more of the circuitry (that would conventionally the placed externally) can be put onto the glass of the screen, which improves the reliability by reducing external connections.

Michelle Cain | alfa
Further information:
http://iop.org/EJ/SST

More articles from Information Technology:

nachricht Touchscreens go 3D with buttons that pulsate and vibrate under your fingertips
14.03.2019 | Universität des Saarlandes

nachricht EU project CALADAN set to reduce manufacturing cost of Terabit/s capable optical transceivers
11.03.2019 | IHP - Leibniz-Institut für innovative Mikroelektronik

All articles from Information Technology >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Revealing the secret of the vacuum for the first time

New research group at the University of Jena combines theory and experiment to demonstrate for the first time certain physical processes in a quantum vacuum

For most people, a vacuum is an empty space. Quantum physics, on the other hand, assumes that even in this lowest-energy state, particles and antiparticles...

Im Focus: Sussex scientists one step closer to a clock that could replace GPS and Galileo

Physicists in the EPic Lab at University of Sussex make crucial development in global race to develop a portable atomic clock

Scientists in the Emergent Photonics Lab (EPic Lab) at the University of Sussex have made a breakthrough to a crucial element of an atomic clock - devices...

Im Focus: Sensing shakes

A new way to sense earthquakes could help improve early warning systems

Every year earthquakes worldwide claim hundreds or even thousands of lives. Forewarning allows people to head for safety and a matter of seconds could spell...

Im Focus: A thermo-sensor for magnetic bits

New concept for energy-efficient data processing technology

Scientists of the Department of Physics at the University of Hamburg, Germany, detected the magnetic states of atoms on a surface using only heat. The...

Im Focus: The moiré patterns of three layers change the electronic properties of graphene

Combining an atomically thin graphene and a boron nitride layer at a slightly rotated angle changes their electrical properties. Physicists at the University of Basel have now shown for the first time the combination with a third layer can result in new material properties also in a three-layer sandwich of carbon and boron nitride. This significantly increases the number of potential synthetic materials, report the researchers in the scientific journal Nano Letters.

Last year, researchers in the US caused a big stir when they showed that rotating two stacked graphene layers by a “magical” angle of 1.1 degrees turns...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

International Modelica Conference with 330 visitors from 21 countries at OTH Regensburg

11.03.2019 | Event News

Selection Completed: 580 Young Scientists from 88 Countries at the Lindau Nobel Laureate Meeting

01.03.2019 | Event News

LightMAT 2019 – 3rd International Conference on Light Materials – Science and Technology

28.02.2019 | Event News

 
Latest News

Researchers measure near-perfect performance in low-cost semiconductors

18.03.2019 | Power and Electrical Engineering

Nanocrystal 'factory' could revolutionize quantum dot manufacturing

18.03.2019 | Materials Sciences

Long-distance quantum information exchange -- success at the nanoscale

18.03.2019 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>