Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Less sulphur in Indian petrol

02.07.2008
For the past five years, scientists from SINTEF and Indian Institute of Petroleum (IIP) in India have attempted to develop cheaper methods to reduce the amount of sulphur in petrol. They have now produced results they are considering patenting.
Restrictions
Sulphur in fuel is harmful to the environment, and restrictions in this area worldwide have become tougher. In a densely populated country like India, sulphur pollution is particularly noticeable through acid rain and smog. At the same time, sulphur poisons the catalyst in vehicles, which can lead to greater emissions of nitrogen oxides.

Head of Project Elisabeth Tangstad at SINTEF Materials and Chemistry says that the project with the Indian scientists started with finding more environmentally-friendly and less energy-demanding methods for removing sulphur from petrol.

Cheaper – and with less energy
Most refineries worldwide reduce the sulphur content in petrol through hydrotreating. This is a relatively expensive process with a high consumption of hydrogen. SINTEF and IIP wanted to develop cheaper and less energy-consuming methods with lower emissions of CO2, and discovered that custom-made porous materials that removed the sulphur compounds from the fuel were a good alternative.

“In this process, the material removes the sulphur without a reaction necessarily occurring,” says Tangstad.

Up scaling
The scientists have now designed, produced and tested a lot of materials on a small scale based on knowledge about the properties of the different material components. The most promising samples have later been up scaled and sent to IIP, which has carried out trials in its own laboratory in more realistic conditions.

In order for the Indian refineries to utilise the new methods, flow charts need to be constructed showing how the innovations can be incorporated into the refinery activities.

Tangstad emphasises that this has been a collaborative project between India and Norway with both institutes benefitting from each other’s background and experiences. In recent years, SINTEF has hosted several Indian scientists on exchanges.

The “Petrol Project” concluded last year. The scientists applied for an extension of a two-year diesel project, which has been granted. The Ministry of Foreign Affairs is financing a contract worth NOK 2.7 million with a possible extension to NOK 5.7 million.

Aase Dragland | alfa
Further information:
http://www.sintef.no

More articles from Ecology, The Environment and Conservation:

nachricht Despite government claims, orangutan populations have not increased. Call for better monitoring
06.11.2018 | Deutsches Zentrum für integrative Biodiversitätsforschung (iDiv) Halle-Jena-Leipzig

nachricht Increasing frequency of ocean storms could alter kelp forest ecosystems
30.10.2018 | University of Virginia

All articles from Ecology, The Environment and Conservation >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: UNH scientists help provide first-ever views of elusive energy explosion

Researchers at the University of New Hampshire have captured a difficult-to-view singular event involving "magnetic reconnection"--the process by which sparse particles and energy around Earth collide producing a quick but mighty explosion--in the Earth's magnetotail, the magnetic environment that trails behind the planet.

Magnetic reconnection has remained a bit of a mystery to scientists. They know it exists and have documented the effects that the energy explosions can...

Im Focus: A Chip with Blood Vessels

Biochips have been developed at TU Wien (Vienna), on which tissue can be produced and examined. This allows supplying the tissue with different substances in a very controlled way.

Cultivating human cells in the Petri dish is not a big challenge today. Producing artificial tissue, however, permeated by fine blood vessels, is a much more...

Im Focus: A Leap Into Quantum Technology

Faster and secure data communication: This is the goal of a new joint project involving physicists from the University of Würzburg. The German Federal Ministry of Education and Research funds the project with 14.8 million euro.

In our digital world data security and secure communication are becoming more and more important. Quantum communication is a promising approach to achieve...

Im Focus: Research icebreaker Polarstern begins the Antarctic season

What does it look like below the ice shelf of the calved massive iceberg A68?

On Saturday, 10 November 2018, the research icebreaker Polarstern will leave its homeport of Bremerhaven, bound for Cape Town, South Africa.

Im Focus: Penn engineers develop ultrathin, ultralight 'nanocardboard'

When choosing materials to make something, trade-offs need to be made between a host of properties, such as thickness, stiffness and weight. Depending on the application in question, finding just the right balance is the difference between success and failure

Now, a team of Penn Engineers has demonstrated a new material they call "nanocardboard," an ultrathin equivalent of corrugated paper cardboard. A square...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

“3rd Conference on Laser Polishing – LaP 2018” Attracts International Experts and Users

09.11.2018 | Event News

On the brain’s ability to find the right direction

06.11.2018 | Event News

European Space Talks: Weltraumschrott – eine Gefahr für die Gesellschaft?

23.10.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

UNH scientists help provide first-ever views of elusive energy explosion

16.11.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

How the gut ‘talks’ to brown fat

16.11.2018 | Life Sciences

Massive impact crater from a kilometer-wide iron meteorite discovered in Greenland

15.11.2018 | Earth Sciences

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>