Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Energy network launches international web survey

05.12.2002


A European website designed to stimulate informed debate on future energy sources this week launches a multi-lingual survey to gauge public attitudes to, and knowledge of, crucial energy issues.



The INTUSER website (www.intuser.net) is a new on-line forum for both the general public and energy experts to communicate about energy issues – from nuclear power and global warming to alternative energy sources such as solar and wave power.

Renewable energy expert Robin Saunders, of the University of Sheffield’s Department of Mechanical Engineering, has worked with international partners to develop the website’s content.


He explained, “There’s little public involvement in energy decision making across Europe, and public awareness of the most important issues is limited – partly because much news media coverage of energy controversies is so ill-informed that it does more harm than good. Various propaganda battles between environmental lobby groups and major energy providers have muddied the waters even further.

“So through the INTUSER project we’re trying to get people thinking rationally about the benefits, costs, drawbacks and risks of all kinds of energy sources. We want to challenge assumptions, and to encourage scientists and other experts to communicate more effectively with the public about energy issues. It’s vital that we engage far more people in the process of making informed strategic energy decisions that will affect the future, not just of Europe but of the whole planet.

“The sort of questions we’re raising are, ‘is there such a thing as safe nuclear energy?’, ‘Are people prepared to pay a premium for energy from renewable sources?’, and ‘What technological developments are needed to achieve a safe, sustainable mix of energy sources for the generations to come?’.

"Our first task is to find out more about the public’s views on energy usage, to help shape our strategy for future developments. So we would like as many people as possible to log on to the website before the New Year and complete the survey they find there."

Jon Pyle | alfa
Further information:
http://www.intuser.net

More articles from Power and Electrical Engineering:

nachricht High-speed surveillance in solar cells catches recombination red-handed
14.02.2019 | Osaka University

nachricht Sodium is the new lithium: Researchers find a way to boost sodium-ion battery performance
04.02.2019 | Nagoya Institute of Technology

All articles from Power and Electrical Engineering >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Regensburg physicists watch electron transfer in a single molecule

For the first time, an international team of scientists based in Regensburg, Germany, has recorded the orbitals of single molecules in different charge states in a novel type of microscopy. The research findings are published under the title “Mapping orbital changes upon electron transfer with tunneling microscopy on insulators” in the prestigious journal “Nature”.

The building blocks of matter surrounding us are atoms and molecules. The properties of that matter, however, are often not set by these building blocks...

Im Focus: University of Konstanz gains new insights into the recent development of the human immune system

Scientists at the University of Konstanz identify fierce competition between the human immune system and bacterial pathogens

Cell biologists from the University of Konstanz shed light on a recent evolutionary process in the human immune system and publish their findings in the...

Im Focus: Transformation through Light

Laser physicists have taken snapshots of carbon molecules C₆₀ showing how they transform in intense infrared light

When carbon molecules C₆₀ are exposed to an intense infrared light, they change their ball-like structure to a more elongated version. This has now been...

Im Focus: Famous “sandpile model” shown to move like a traveling sand dune

Researchers at IST Austria find new property of important physical model. Results published in PNAS

The so-called Abelian sandpile model has been studied by scientists for more than 30 years to better understand a physical phenomenon called self-organized...

Im Focus: Cryo-force spectroscopy reveals the mechanical properties of DNA components

Physicists from the University of Basel have developed a new method to examine the elasticity and binding properties of DNA molecules on a surface at extremely low temperatures. With a combination of cryo-force spectroscopy and computer simulations, they were able to show that DNA molecules behave like a chain of small coil springs. The researchers reported their findings in Nature Communications.

DNA is not only a popular research topic because it contains the blueprint for life – it can also be used to produce tiny components for technical applications.

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

Global Legal Hackathon at HAW Hamburg

11.02.2019 | Event News

The world of quantum chemistry meets in Heidelberg

30.01.2019 | Event News

Our digital society in 2040

16.01.2019 | Event News

 
Latest News

Gravitational waves will settle cosmic conundrum

15.02.2019 | Physics and Astronomy

Spintronics by 'straintronics'

15.02.2019 | Physics and Astronomy

Platinum nanoparticles for selective treatment of liver cancer cells

15.02.2019 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>