Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Gustav Hertz Prize of DPG for Dr. Eleftherios Goulielmakis

20.11.2012
Dr. Eleftherios Goulielmakis, a research group leader at the Max-Planck-Institute of Quantum Optics (MPQ) in Garching (Germany), has been named as the recipient of the 2013 Gustav Hertz Award of the German Physical Society (DPG).
This DPG award is in particular given to young physicists in recognition of a recent scientific achievement, in order to encourage young physics students. Dr. Goulielmakis will be presented with this prize for “outstanding contributions in the field of attosecond physics, in particular for his work on the attosecond control of light fields and their use for tracing the motion of electrons in atoms in real time which paves the way towards controlling matter on a nanoscopic scale with unprecedented precision.”

Dr. Eleftherios Goulielmakis, born in 1975 in Heraklion (Greece), received his B.SC. and Master’s degree from the Physics Department of the University of Crete (Greece), in 2000 and 2002 respectively, and his PhD from the Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München (LMU), Germany, in 2005. He then worked as a scientist in the Division of Attosecond Physics (led by Prof. Ferenc Krausz), being one of the project leaders of the Munich-Centre for Advanced Photonics (MAP). In 2010 he received an ERC Starting Grant of the European Research Council which enabled him to start his own research group “Attoelectronics”.

In his dissertation Dr. Eleftherios Goulielmakis focused on the development of what is of central importance in attosecond science and metrology today: the attosecond streaking technique. This technique utilized the ultrafast field variation of light pulses in order to capture fast electronic phenomena of the microcosm. Other than its important implications for the understanding of quantum mechanical processes, the technique allowed the establishment of a novel – and up to date unique – method for capturing the field waveform of light waves.

Some of his most remarkable achievements are the generation of the shortest isolated burst of electromagnetic radiation generated to date lasting as short as 80 attoseconds (1 as = 10 to the -18 s) in 2008 as well as the use of such bursts to trace, in real time, the motion of electrons in atoms in 2010. More recently Dr. Goulielmakis and his research group Attoelectronics focused on developing the world’s first Light Field Synthesizer, an experimental apparatus that manipulates extremely broadband light pulses that span from the ultraviolet to the deep infrared part of the electromagnetic spectrum.

It allows scientists – for the first time – to synthesize and to tailor the field waveform of a light pulse with sub-optical cycle resolution and attosecond precision. These light transients offer yet a more sophisticated platform for controlling electrons with light and open up new ways to manipulating the microcosm at unprecedented temporal precision. Important implications of these developments, in the years to come, may be anticipated in areas such as photonics, chemistry and nanotechnology.

Dr. Goulielmakis is also the recipient of the Foteinos Prize of the Academy of Athens in 2007 and the “IUPAP Young Scientist Prize in Optics” from the International Union of Pure and Applied Physics in 2010. The Gustav Hertz Award will be prsented to Eleftherios Goulielmakis on the occasion of the next annual meeting of the German Physical Society, which will take place in Dresden in March 2013. Olivia Meyer-Streng

Contact:
Dr. Eleftherios Goulielmakis
Max-Planck-Institute of Quantum Optics
Laboratory for Attosecond Physics
Research Group Attoelectronics
Hans-Kopfermann-Str. 1, D-85748 Garching, Germany
Phone: +49( 0) 89 32 905 -632
Fax:+49 (0) 89 32 905 -200
e-mail: eleftherios.goulielmakis@mpq.mpg.de
www.attoworld.de/goulielmakis-group

Dr. Olivia Meyer-Streng
Press & Public Relations
Max-Planck-Institute of Quantum Optics
Hans-Kopfermann-Str. 1, D-85748 Garching, Germany
Phone: +49(0) 89 32 905 -213
Fax:+49(0) 89 32 905 -200
e-mail: olivia.meyer-streng@mpq.mpg.de

Dr. Olivia Meyer-Streng | Max-Planck-Institut
Further information:
http://www.mpq.mpg.de

More articles from Awards Funding:

nachricht Million funding for Deep Learning project in Leipzig
15.08.2018 | Max-Planck-Institut für Mathematik in den Naturwissenschaften (MPIMIS)

nachricht Advanced Grant for Grain Boundary Phase Transformations
06.08.2018 | Max-Planck-Institut für Eisenforschung GmbH

All articles from Awards Funding >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Color effects from transparent 3D-printed nanostructures

New design tool automatically creates nanostructure 3D-print templates for user-given colors
Scientists present work at prestigious SIGGRAPH conference

Most of the objects we see are colored by pigments, but using pigments has disadvantages: such colors can fade, industrial pigments are often toxic, and...

Im Focus: Unraveling the nature of 'whistlers' from space in the lab

A new study sheds light on how ultralow frequency radio waves and plasmas interact

Scientists at the University of California, Los Angeles present new research on a curious cosmic phenomenon known as "whistlers" -- very low frequency packets...

Im Focus: New interactive machine learning tool makes car designs more aerodynamic

Scientists develop first tool to use machine learning methods to compute flow around interactively designable 3D objects. Tool will be presented at this year’s prestigious SIGGRAPH conference.

When engineers or designers want to test the aerodynamic properties of the newly designed shape of a car, airplane, or other object, they would normally model...

Im Focus: Robots as 'pump attendants': TU Graz develops robot-controlled rapid charging system for e-vehicles

Researchers from TU Graz and their industry partners have unveiled a world first: the prototype of a robot-controlled, high-speed combined charging system (CCS) for electric vehicles that enables series charging of cars in various parking positions.

Global demand for electric vehicles is forecast to rise sharply: by 2025, the number of new vehicle registrations is expected to reach 25 million per year....

Im Focus: The “TRiC” to folding actin

Proteins must be folded correctly to fulfill their molecular functions in cells. Molecular assistants called chaperones help proteins exploit their inbuilt folding potential and reach the correct three-dimensional structure. Researchers at the Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry (MPIB) have demonstrated that actin, the most abundant protein in higher developed cells, does not have the inbuilt potential to fold and instead requires special assistance to fold into its active state. The chaperone TRiC uses a previously undescribed mechanism to perform actin folding. The study was recently published in the journal Cell.

Actin is the most abundant protein in highly developed cells and has diverse functions in processes like cell stabilization, cell division and muscle...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

LaserForum 2018 deals with 3D production of components

17.08.2018 | Event News

Within reach of the Universe

08.08.2018 | Event News

A journey through the history of microscopy – new exhibition opens at the MDC

27.07.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Smallest transistor worldwide switches current with a single atom in solid electrolyte

17.08.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

Robots as Tools and Partners in Rehabilitation

17.08.2018 | Information Technology

Climate Impact Research in Hannover: Small Plants against Large Waves

17.08.2018 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>