Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

The materials engineers are developing environmentally friendly materials

02.11.2018

The materials engineers are developing environmentally friendly materials for producing smart textiles

Recently the research article "A method for producing conductive graphene biopolymer nanofibrous fabrics by exploitation of an ionic liquid dispersant in electrospinning" written by the researchers of Tallinn University of Technology was published in a leading peer-reviewed journal Carbon.


Original raw material of smart fabric

Credit: TalTech University

The article introduces nanofibers, a material produced by the electrospinning device at the Laboratory of Polymers and Textile Technology in Tallinn University of Technology, and their expanding range of applications. It is not possible to produce fibers with a diameter smaller than a micrometer by using conventional fiber spinning methods. Therefore, electrospinning technology is introduced, by which nanofibers are created by applying high voltage to polymer solution.

The beginning of the 20th century can be considered to be the starting point of electrospinning as a scientific discipline, the quest for industrial applications started 50 years ago. In recent years, there has been a surge of interest in electrospinning. One of the co-authors of the research article, Head of the Laboratory of Polymers and Textile Technology of Tallinn University of Technology, Professor Andres Krumme says, "The electrospun carbon nanomaterial can also be called smart fabric.

The nanofibers forming the material are 100 times thinner in diameter than hair, being however extremely strong, tough, flexible and due to carbon content also conductive. The material allows efficient energy storage owing to its high speci?c surface area."

The specific properties of nanofibers render it a promising material for future applications:

  • In environmental protection the non-woven fabric made of nanofibers can be used to clean contaminated air or water from fine particulate matter and heavy metals. In agriculture the smart fabric can be used e.g. as a shade cloth for plants to keep away insect pests (which is, of course, more effective than the existing shade cloths).
  • In medicine the nanofabric can, due to the environment similar to the natural environment of a human body, be used to grow cells and produce antibacterial plasters and bandages. Nanofibers can be used to create cell culture media (stem cells are seeded on a biopolymer mat) and the grown stem cells can then be transplanted e.g. to damaged human skin.
  • In clothing industry nanofibrous materials can be used to produce special protective clothing containing energy saving and collecting fibers (the collected energy can be used e.g. to charge a mobile phone). Nanofibrous electrodes with enhanced mechanical properties can be used as components of smart clothing to monitor and affect the health condition of the wearer. Garment sensors provide information about the wearer's needs as well as potential emergency situations (rescuers, fishermen, etc.).

"Cellulose used as the original raw material of smart fabric is very acceptable for human body due to its properties, i.e. the raw material used in polymer fabric is bio-based and supports the natural carbon cycle," Andres Krumme says.

###

Source: Carbon, 2018 https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S000862231830767X

Media Contact

Andres Krumme
andres.krumme@taltech.ee
372-527-5143

http://www.etag.ee/ 

Andres Krumme | EurekAlert!

More articles from Materials Sciences:

nachricht Turning up the heat to create new nanostructured metals
21.11.2019 | DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

nachricht Small particles, big effects: How graphene nanoparticles improve the resolution of microscopes
20.11.2019 | Max-Planck-Institut für Polymerforschung

All articles from Materials Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Machine learning microscope adapts lighting to improve diagnosis

Prototype microscope teaches itself the best illumination settings for diagnosing malaria

Engineers at Duke University have developed a microscope that adapts its lighting angles, colors and patterns while teaching itself the optimal...

Im Focus: Small particles, big effects: How graphene nanoparticles improve the resolution of microscopes

Conventional light microscopes cannot distinguish structures when they are separated by a distance smaller than, roughly, the wavelength of light. Superresolution microscopy, developed since the 1980s, lifts this limitation, using fluorescent moieties. Scientists at the Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research have now discovered that graphene nano-molecules can be used to improve this microscopy technique. These graphene nano-molecules offer a number of substantial advantages over the materials previously used, making superresolution microscopy even more versatile.

Microscopy is an important investigation method, in physics, biology, medicine, and many other sciences. However, it has one disadvantage: its resolution is...

Im Focus: Atoms don't like jumping rope

Nanooptical traps are a promising building block for quantum technologies. Austrian and German scientists have now removed an important obstacle to their practical use. They were able to show that a special form of mechanical vibration heats trapped particles in a very short time and knocks them out of the trap.

By controlling individual atoms, quantum properties can be investigated and made usable for technological applications. For about ten years, physicists have...

Im Focus: Images from NJIT's big bear solar observatory peel away layers of a stellar mystery

An international team of scientists, including three researchers from New Jersey Institute of Technology (NJIT), has shed new light on one of the central mysteries of solar physics: how energy from the Sun is transferred to the star's upper atmosphere, heating it to 1 million degrees Fahrenheit and higher in some regions, temperatures that are vastly hotter than the Sun's surface.

With new images from NJIT's Big Bear Solar Observatory (BBSO), the researchers have revealed in groundbreaking, granular detail what appears to be a likely...

Im Focus: New opportunities in additive manufacturing presented

Fraunhofer IFAM Dresden demonstrates manufacturing of copper components

The Fraunhofer Institute for Manufacturing Technology and Advanced Materials IFAM in Dresden has succeeded in using Selective Electron Beam Melting (SEBM) to...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

First International Conference on Agrophotovoltaics in August 2020

15.11.2019 | Event News

Laser Symposium on Electromobility in Aachen: trends for the mobility revolution

15.11.2019 | Event News

High entropy alloys for hot turbines and tireless metal-forming presses

05.11.2019 | Event News

 
Latest News

Designer lens helps see the big picture

21.11.2019 | Interdisciplinary Research

Machine learning microscope adapts lighting to improve diagnosis

21.11.2019 | Life Sciences

Soft skin-like robots you can put in your pocket

21.11.2019 | Interdisciplinary Research

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>