Staph Infection Process Leading to B Cell Suicide Described for First Time

Enhances Potential for Future Development of B-Cell Based Therapy for Lupus

Researchers at the University of California, San Diego—supported by the Alliance for Lupus Research and the National Institutes of Health—have for the first time described a method that Staphylococcus aureus (staph) infection uses to inactivate the body’s immune system. A protein produced by the staph bacteria causes previously healthy B cells—a specialized cell of the immune system—to commit suicide, a process called apoptosis. The research will be published in the May 5 issue of the Journal of Experimental Medicine and at http://www.jem.org/pap.shtml on April 28.

In the new study, the researchers found that SpA, a staph protein, functions as a B cell toxin in mice. The protein attaches to a receptor on B cells, eventually causing the B cells to turn on themselves in a suicide process.

Researchers believe that B cells play a major role in tissue damage that occurs in lupus. “By the targeted elimination of disease-causing B cells, properly dosed injections of SpA may have the potential to control the over-activity of the immune system that causes damage in autoimmune diseases like lupus and in certain cancers,” said Gregg Silverman, M.D., UCSD professor of medicine and senior author of the paper.

“The significance of Dr. Silverman’s research is that the discovery that injections of SpA limit the activity of B cells in animals allows us to proceed to the next step, to test the protein’s usefulness in people,” said John H. Klippel, MD, scientific director of the Alliance for Lupus Research, which funded this study. “If results hold true for people, SpA may eventually prove to be an effective treatment for lupus.”

In addition to Silverman, the study was conducted by the paper’s co-author Carl S. Goodyear, Ph.D., a UCSD postdoctoral researcher.

The study was funded by the National Institutes of Health and the Alliance for Lupus Research. The ALR was founded by Robert Wood Johnson IV, of the Johnson & Johnson healthcare family and owner of the NFL’s New York Jets, with the Arthritis Foundation to raise the profile and scope of lupus research. Since its inception in 1999, the Alliance has committed more than $24 million to research, and has made remarkable gains toward unlocking the mysteries of this disease. ALR directs 100 percent of funds raised to peer-reviewed research and scientific programs. It recently received the highest rating (four stars) from Charity Navigator, an independent resource that evaluates the effectiveness and financial health of more than 2,300 charities.

For more information on our press releases, contact:
Linda De Vito
The Graubard Group
(212) 966-9000
ldevito@graubardgroup.com

Media Contact

Linda De Vito Alliance for Lupus Research

Alle Nachrichten aus der Kategorie: Health and Medicine

This subject area encompasses research and studies in the field of human medicine.

Among the wide-ranging list of topics covered here are anesthesiology, anatomy, surgery, human genetics, hygiene and environmental medicine, internal medicine, neurology, pharmacology, physiology, urology and dental medicine.

Zurück zur Startseite

Kommentare (0)

Schreib Kommentar

Neueste Beiträge

Geologists simulate soil conditions to help grow plants on Mars

Humankind’s next giant step may be onto Mars. But before those missions can begin, scientists need to make scores of breakthrough advances, including learning how to grow crops on the…

Theoreticians show which quantum systems are suitable for quantum simulations

A joint research group led by Prof. Jens Eisert of Freie Universität Berlin and Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin (HZB) has shown a way to simulate the quantum physical properties of complex solid…

Most migratory birds rely on a greening world

Continued climate change could spell disaster for many species. A new study from the Cornell Lab of Ornithology confirms that most birds–but not all–synchronize their migratory movements with seasonal changes…

By continuing to use the site, you agree to the use of cookies. more information

The cookie settings on this website are set to "allow cookies" to give you the best browsing experience possible. If you continue to use this website without changing your cookie settings or you click "Accept" below then you are consenting to this.

Close