Should People With Diabetes Sleep With The Lights On?

A research letter in this week’s issue of THE LANCET suggests that night-time illumination could help prevent the onset of diabetic retinopathy, a condition which can result in severe visual impairment in people with diabetes.

People with diabetes generally have impaired blood capillary function, which reduces oxygen uptake to body tissue, including the retina. It has been suggested that retinal damage associated with diabetes (diabetic retinopathy) might be initiated by oxygen deprivation to the inner layers of the retina during the hours of darkness; this is thought to occur because the rod receptors (responsible for night vision) have the highest oxygen demand of any cell in the human body at low levels of illumination. Analysis by electrical stimulation shows that the activity (assessed by amplitude of oscillatory potentials) in the inner retinal cells is reduced among people with diabetes.

Neville Drasdo and colleagues from Cardiff University, UK, investigated the effect of oxygen inhalation on the amplitude of oscillatory potentials after dark adaptation in seven patients with type 2 diabetes and eight controls. They found that the decreased oscillatory potentials induced by dark adaptation in the diabetic patients increased during oxygen inhalation to an amplitude that was comparable to that of the controls before oxygen; oscillatory potentials in the controls were unaffected by oxygen.

Neville Drasdo comments: “Since light transmission through closed lids is adequate to suppress dark adaptation, our findings strengthen the suggestion that diabetic patients might benefit from a modified cycle of night-time illumination during sleep, to reduce oxygen consumption in the retina.”

Media Contact

Richard Lane alfa

Alle Nachrichten aus der Kategorie: Health and Medicine

This subject area encompasses research and studies in the field of human medicine.

Among the wide-ranging list of topics covered here are anesthesiology, anatomy, surgery, human genetics, hygiene and environmental medicine, internal medicine, neurology, pharmacology, physiology, urology and dental medicine.

Zurück zur Startseite

Kommentare (0)

Schreib Kommentar

Neueste Beiträge

Rotation of a molecule as an “internal clock”

Using a new method, physicists at the Heidelberg Max Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics have investigated the ultrafast fragmentation of hydrogen molecules in intense laser fields in detail. They used…

3D printing the first ever biomimetic tongue surface

Scientists have created synthetic soft surfaces with tongue-like textures for the first time using 3D printing, opening new possibilities for testing oral processing properties of food, nutritional technologies, pharmaceutics and…

How to figure out what you don’t know

Increasingly, biologists are turning to computational modeling to make sense of complex systems. In neuroscience, researchers are adapting the kinds of algorithms used to forecast the weather or filter spam…

By continuing to use the site, you agree to the use of cookies. more information

The cookie settings on this website are set to "allow cookies" to give you the best browsing experience possible. If you continue to use this website without changing your cookie settings or you click "Accept" below then you are consenting to this.

Close