Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Ultra fast 100 percent examination under the microscope

11.11.2015

Large-scale components with tiny details often have to be examined under the microscope for quality control. The demand for microscopic test methods is particularly high in the semi-conductor and electronics industry due to the high degree of miniaturization. However, the recording process is very tedious when examining large objects microscopically, because thousands of individual photos must be taken and analyzed. From 10. to 13. November 2015, Fraunhofer IPT is presenting a new recording process, with which large-scale objects can be examined under the microscope in a matter of seconds, at the electronics trade fair “Productronica”.

High-Speed-Microscopy for quality control

Traditional recording processes for large components with high magnification often take so long that 100 percent examinations cannot be performed due to a lack of time meaning that only random samples can be examined.

After all, the number of photos and therefore the time required depend on the magnification used in microscopy: the large-scale component must be precisely positioned with the sample table before the individual photos can be produced and analyzed.

Fraunhofer IPT has now developed a new recording process, with which large-scale components can be examined under the microscope in just a few seconds: the table moves the object continually during the recording procedure, in contrast to the conventional “Stop-and-Go” operation.

This allows the sample to be digitalized with very high image rates – with more than 100 frames per second depending on the camera. Due to the fact that the object is only exposed extremely briefly with a flash, the photo is also free of any motion blur.

During the continuous scanning process, the focus is readjusted using real-time-capable hardware autofocus systems so that the sample is displayed with a sharp focus at all points.

High-performance data and image processing

The time-optimized scanning process is combined with real-time-capable data handling and image preprocessing stages. Even intensive computing steps such as stitching processes run almost without delay thanks to GPU support.

Automated image processing work for quality control can already be carried out parallel to the scan, so that the results of the examination process are available immediately after the high-speed scanning process.

This new system is the first to allow a successful 100 percent microscopic examination that can keep up with the rapid speed of industrial production.

Contact

Dipl.-Ing. Dipl.-Wirt.-Ing. Friedrich Schenk
Fraunhofer Institute for Production Technology IPT
Steinbachstrasse 17
52074 Aachen
Germany
Phone +49 241 8904-218
friedrich.schenk@ipt.fraunhofer.de

www.ipt.fraunhofer.de

Weitere Informationen:

http://www.ipt.fraunhofer.de/en/Press/Pressreleases/20151109highspeedmicroscopy....

Susanne Krause | Fraunhofer-Institut für Produktionstechnologie IPT

More articles from Trade Fair News:

nachricht High Resolution Laser Structuring of Thin Films at LOPEC 2017
21.03.2017 | Fraunhofer-Institut für Lasertechnik ILT

nachricht Open ecosystem for smart assistance systems
20.03.2017 | Fraunhofer-Institut für Arbeitswirtschaft und Organisation IAO

All articles from Trade Fair News >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: A Challenging European Research Project to Develop New Tiny Microscopes

The Institute of Semiconductor Technology and the Institute of Physical and Theoretical Chemistry, both members of the Laboratory for Emerging Nanometrology (LENA), at Technische Universität Braunschweig are partners in a new European research project entitled ChipScope, which aims to develop a completely new and extremely small optical microscope capable of observing the interior of living cells in real time. A consortium of 7 partners from 5 countries will tackle this issue with very ambitious objectives during a four-year research program.

To demonstrate the usefulness of this new scientific tool, at the end of the project the developed chip-sized microscope will be used to observe in real-time...

Im Focus: Giant Magnetic Fields in the Universe

Astronomers from Bonn and Tautenburg in Thuringia (Germany) used the 100-m radio telescope at Effelsberg to observe several galaxy clusters. At the edges of these large accumulations of dark matter, stellar systems (galaxies), hot gas, and charged particles, they found magnetic fields that are exceptionally ordered over distances of many million light years. This makes them the most extended magnetic fields in the universe known so far.

The results will be published on March 22 in the journal „Astronomy & Astrophysics“.

Galaxy clusters are the largest gravitationally bound structures in the universe. With a typical extent of about 10 million light years, i.e. 100 times the...

Im Focus: Tracing down linear ubiquitination

Researchers at the Goethe University Frankfurt, together with partners from the University of Tübingen in Germany and Queen Mary University as well as Francis Crick Institute from London (UK) have developed a novel technology to decipher the secret ubiquitin code.

Ubiquitin is a small protein that can be linked to other cellular proteins, thereby controlling and modulating their functions. The attachment occurs in many...

Im Focus: Perovskite edges can be tuned for optoelectronic performance

Layered 2D material improves efficiency for solar cells and LEDs

In the eternal search for next generation high-efficiency solar cells and LEDs, scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory and their partners are creating...

Im Focus: Polymer-coated silicon nanosheets as alternative to graphene: A perfect team for nanoelectronics

Silicon nanosheets are thin, two-dimensional layers with exceptional optoelectronic properties very similar to those of graphene. Albeit, the nanosheets are less stable. Now researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have, for the first time ever, produced a composite material combining silicon nanosheets and a polymer that is both UV-resistant and easy to process. This brings the scientists a significant step closer to industrial applications like flexible displays and photosensors.

Silicon nanosheets are thin, two-dimensional layers with exceptional optoelectronic properties very similar to those of graphene. Albeit, the nanosheets are...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

International Land Use Symposium ILUS 2017: Call for Abstracts and Registration open

20.03.2017 | Event News

CONNECT 2017: International congress on connective tissue

14.03.2017 | Event News

ICTM Conference: Turbine Construction between Big Data and Additive Manufacturing

07.03.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Transport of molecular motors into cilia

28.03.2017 | Life Sciences

A novel hybrid UAV that may change the way people operate drones

28.03.2017 | Information Technology

NASA spacecraft investigate clues in radiation belts

28.03.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>