Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:


Release agent free demolding of components & heat and electricity conducting composite material

At K 2013 in Düsseldorf (Hall 07, Stand B05) the Fraunhofer Institute for Manufacturing Technology and Advanced Materials IFAM, Bremen, will present FlexPLAS® release films and ReleasePLAS® coatings which allow effective demolding of components without the use of release agents.

Focus will also be put on a new polymer-metal composite material which is suitable for the structural monitoring of components or for seawater desalination applications.

Release agent free manufacture of very large components: Checking the deep-drawn fold-free FlexPLAS® release film on the mold for a CFRP aircraft fuselage section (© Fraunhofer IFAM).

Heat conducting composite pipes for seawater desalination (© Fraunhofer IFAM).

Effective and residue-free demolding, as well as coating

It is a process that is repeated hundreds of thousands of times a day in industry on a small scale: A component is manufactured using a mold and thereafter removed from the mold. New technologies from Fraunhofer IFAM, namely FlexPLAS® release films and ReleasePLAS® mold coating technology, allow effective demolding of components without the need to use release agents.

The FlexPLAS® release film technology was awarded the “AVK Innovation Prize 2012” and the “Composite Innovations Award 2013”. Features of these films are their extreme elasticity and durability. They can be stretched with little force and can even withstand extreme elongation of up to 300 percent without functionality impairment. This is ideal for fold-free application, even on curved or structured molds. The films can also be used manufacturing very large components made of fiber reinforced plastics (FRPs).

Following demolding, the components can be immediately coated without the need for complex pre-treatment. This is because there is no transfer of materials from the release film, meaning no costs are incurred removing contaminants or residues of release agents. The new technology also allows the in-mold coating of fiber composite components: This process is relatively easy and involves applying a gel coat to the FlexPLAS® release film. The degree of matt/gloss of the coated surface can be adjusted via the roughness of the FlexPLAS® release film that is employed. This coating technique significantly lowers the risk of coating defects. The production of the FRP component itself takes place on top of the coating. The in-mold coating and FRP component are cured together and the coated component with the release film is then removed from the mold. If the release film is kept on the component to the end of the manufacturing process or until delivery to the final customer, then it also serves as a protective film.

In contrast, the ReleasePLAS® coating is applied directly to the mold. It perfectly matches the surface structure and its properties can be adapted to various customer-specific requirements.

New composite material conduct heat and electricity

The new material is a mixture of plastic and metal, namely a “polymer-metal composite”. A wide range of polymers can be used as the matrix material for the composite. The material can therefore be readily customized for specific applications. Other advantages: The material is easy to process because of his plastic character. It is also light and conducts electricity and heat very effectively due to the high metal content.

The composite material is ideal for the structural monitoring of load-bearing components. When a component is exposed to loads, the electrical resistance of the composite changes. These signals can be transmitted via a cable on the component and then analyzed by a measuring instrument. The composite material is used in the form of heat-conducting pipes for seawater desalination. The principle of desalination: Seawater is sprayed onto pipes through which hot gas or water flows, so heating the pipes. Pure water evaporates from the seawater leaving behind a salty waste liquor.

K 2013 I October 16-23, 2013 I Düsseldorf I Germany
Hall 07 I Stand B05

Anne-Grete Becker | Fraunhofer-Institut
Further information:

More articles from Trade Fair News:

nachricht Creating living spaces for people: The »Fraunhofer CityLaboratory« at BAU 2017
14.10.2016 | Fraunhofer-Gesellschaft

nachricht Reducing Weight through Laser-assisted Material Processing in Automobile Construction
13.10.2016 | Fraunhofer-Institut für Lasertechnik ILT

All articles from Trade Fair News >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: New 3-D wiring technique brings scalable quantum computers closer to reality

Researchers from the Institute for Quantum Computing (IQC) at the University of Waterloo led the development of a new extensible wiring technique capable of controlling superconducting quantum bits, representing a significant step towards to the realization of a scalable quantum computer.

"The quantum socket is a wiring method that uses three-dimensional wires based on spring-loaded pins to address individual qubits," said Jeremy Béjanin, a PhD...

Im Focus: Scientists develop a semiconductor nanocomposite material that moves in response to light

In a paper in Scientific Reports, a research team at Worcester Polytechnic Institute describes a novel light-activated phenomenon that could become the basis for applications as diverse as microscopic robotic grippers and more efficient solar cells.

A research team at Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI) has developed a revolutionary, light-activated semiconductor nanocomposite material that can be used...

Im Focus: Diamonds aren't forever: Sandia, Harvard team create first quantum computer bridge

By forcefully embedding two silicon atoms in a diamond matrix, Sandia researchers have demonstrated for the first time on a single chip all the components needed to create a quantum bridge to link quantum computers together.

"People have already built small quantum computers," says Sandia researcher Ryan Camacho. "Maybe the first useful one won't be a single giant quantum computer...

Im Focus: New Products - Highlights of COMPAMED 2016

COMPAMED has become the leading international marketplace for suppliers of medical manufacturing. The trade fair, which takes place every November and is co-located to MEDICA in Dusseldorf, has been steadily growing over the past years and shows that medical technology remains a rapidly growing market.

In 2016, the joint pavilion by the IVAM Microtechnology Network, the Product Market “High-tech for Medical Devices”, will be located in Hall 8a again and will...

Im Focus: Ultra-thin ferroelectric material for next-generation electronics

'Ferroelectric' materials can switch between different states of electrical polarization in response to an external electric field. This flexibility means they show promise for many applications, for example in electronic devices and computer memory. Current ferroelectric materials are highly valued for their thermal and chemical stability and rapid electro-mechanical responses, but creating a material that is scalable down to the tiny sizes needed for technologies like silicon-based semiconductors (Si-based CMOS) has proven challenging.

Now, Hiroshi Funakubo and co-workers at the Tokyo Institute of Technology, in collaboration with researchers across Japan, have conducted experiments to...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>



Event News

#IC2S2: When Social Science meets Computer Science - GESIS will host the IC2S2 conference 2017

14.10.2016 | Event News

Agricultural Trade Developments and Potentials in Central Asia and the South Caucasus

14.10.2016 | Event News

World Health Summit – Day Three: A Call to Action

12.10.2016 | Event News

Latest News

Innovative technique for shaping light could solve bandwidth crunch

20.10.2016 | Physics and Astronomy

Finding the lightest superdeformed triaxial atomic nucleus

20.10.2016 | Physics and Astronomy

NASA's MAVEN mission observes ups and downs of water escape from Mars

20.10.2016 | Physics and Astronomy

More VideoLinks >>>