Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:


IAA: Glass-like coatings for automotive parts combine protection with beautiful colour


Today's car enthusiasts have a diverse range of requirements: popular issues that concern them include safety in the vehicle, a good driving experience, a powerful engine and sophisticated technology. 

If drivers want to make an impression with their vehicle, decorative elements such as coloured wheel rims, brake calipers, exhausts, footboards or bodywork and engine components are increasingly being added. In an ideal scenario, it is possible to combine decorative coatings with protection from corrosion and wear.

Glass-like coatings for automotive parts combine protection with beautiful colour.

Copyright: INM; free within this press release

INM will be presenting such coatings at this year's IAA International Motor Show. It will present its results in cooperation with in Hall 4.0 at Stand D27.

The coatings have glassy and glass-ceramic properties. They therefore reduce the level of corrosion and wear, susceptibility to scratching or tarnishing and other processes of oxidation on surfaces.

To complement these protective properties, depending on the choice of colour pigments, the INM production method can be used to produce the colours of red, black, green, white and blue for decorative purposes with stability at high temperatures.

These functional coatings are suitable for metallic substrates such as steel, aluminium or alloys or as a protective layer for glassy components.

"In addition to the properties which have been mentioned, our production method also opens up other possibilities," says Peter William de Oliveira, head of the Optical Materials program division. These include possible non-stick properties, a certain flexibility in the layer or also the possibility of electrical insulation as a result of the vitreousness.

The INM uses special silicates for the coatings. They are converted into a sol-gel nanocomposite in a single-step reaction. Depending on the colour pigment and the substrate, this means that surfaces can be hermetically sealed at from 200 to 800 degrees Celsius.

The thickness of these layers ranges from two to ten micrometres. Curved and flat surfaces can easily be covered with the coating in immersion chambers or spray booths.

Your expert at the INM:
Dr. Peter William de Oliveira
INM – Leibniz Institute for New Materials
Head Optical Materials
Head InnovationCenter INM
Phone: +49681-9300-148

INM conducts research and development to create new materials – for today, tomorrow and beyond. Chemists, physicists, biologists, materials scientists and engineers team up to focus on these essential questions: Which material properties are new, how can they be investigated and how can they be tailored for industrial applications in the future? Four research thrusts determine the current developments at INM: New materials for energy application, new concepts for medical surfaces, new surface materials for tribological systems and nano safety and nano bio. Research at INM is performed in three fields: Nanocomposite Technology, Interface Materials, and Bio Interfaces.
INM – Leibniz Institute for New Materials, situated in Saarbrücken, is an internationally leading centre for materials research. It is an institute of the Leibniz Association and has about 210 employees.

Dr. Carola Jung | idw - Informationsdienst Wissenschaft
Further information:

More articles from Trade Fair News:

nachricht Creating living spaces for people: The »Fraunhofer CityLaboratory« at BAU 2017
14.10.2016 | Fraunhofer-Gesellschaft

nachricht Reducing Weight through Laser-assisted Material Processing in Automobile Construction
13.10.2016 | Fraunhofer-Institut für Lasertechnik ILT

All articles from Trade Fair News >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Etching Microstructures with Lasers

Ultrafast lasers have introduced new possibilities in engraving ultrafine structures, and scientists are now also investigating how to use them to etch microstructures into thin glass. There are possible applications in analytics (lab on a chip) and especially in electronics and the consumer sector, where great interest has been shown.

This new method was born of a surprising phenomenon: irradiating glass in a particular way with an ultrafast laser has the effect of making the glass up to a...

Im Focus: Light-driven atomic rotations excite magnetic waves

Terahertz excitation of selected crystal vibrations leads to an effective magnetic field that drives coherent spin motion

Controlling functional properties by light is one of the grand goals in modern condensed matter physics and materials science. A new study now demonstrates how...

Im Focus: New 3-D wiring technique brings scalable quantum computers closer to reality

Researchers from the Institute for Quantum Computing (IQC) at the University of Waterloo led the development of a new extensible wiring technique capable of controlling superconducting quantum bits, representing a significant step towards to the realization of a scalable quantum computer.

"The quantum socket is a wiring method that uses three-dimensional wires based on spring-loaded pins to address individual qubits," said Jeremy Béjanin, a PhD...

Im Focus: Scientists develop a semiconductor nanocomposite material that moves in response to light

In a paper in Scientific Reports, a research team at Worcester Polytechnic Institute describes a novel light-activated phenomenon that could become the basis for applications as diverse as microscopic robotic grippers and more efficient solar cells.

A research team at Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI) has developed a revolutionary, light-activated semiconductor nanocomposite material that can be used...

Im Focus: Diamonds aren't forever: Sandia, Harvard team create first quantum computer bridge

By forcefully embedding two silicon atoms in a diamond matrix, Sandia researchers have demonstrated for the first time on a single chip all the components needed to create a quantum bridge to link quantum computers together.

"People have already built small quantum computers," says Sandia researcher Ryan Camacho. "Maybe the first useful one won't be a single giant quantum computer...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>



Event News

#IC2S2: When Social Science meets Computer Science - GESIS will host the IC2S2 conference 2017

14.10.2016 | Event News

Agricultural Trade Developments and Potentials in Central Asia and the South Caucasus

14.10.2016 | Event News

World Health Summit – Day Three: A Call to Action

12.10.2016 | Event News

Latest News

First results of NSTX-U research operations

26.10.2016 | Physics and Astronomy

UCI and NASA document accelerated glacier melting in West Antarctica

26.10.2016 | Earth Sciences

Ice shelf vibrations cause unusual waves in Antarctic atmosphere

25.10.2016 | Earth Sciences

More VideoLinks >>>