Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

The new dynamics of European migration

28.02.2008
Policy issues on migration in Europe could easily provoke heated debates and generate enormous interest. These issues have recently drawn a crowd of over 40 researchers and about 50 students, journalists, policymakers and others to Nice in December 2007 for an ESF conference on migration and its effects on the legal and illegal European workforce.

The delegates heard that migrant labour is taking on new forms in Europe. Freer markets and new technology are affecting labour all over the world, but the emergence and enlargement of the European Union mean that change is especially rapid in Europe.

Different EU nations have opened their labour markets to people from the new EU states at different rates and on different conditions. This means that many migrant workers cannot join the mainstream economy and are trapped in seasonal or temporary work. At the same time, European politicians such as the president of France have discussed limiting the number of migrants from outside Europe and closing its borders.

Under these pressures, immigrants to and within Europe are marginalised. They are subject to many pressures about which our knowledge is imperfect. There are legal, social, economic and political constraints. Delegates at the Nice conference spoke eloquently about them and explained them with the use of valuable case studies.

New opportunities - for some

At the same time, the new situation for European migrants is not a simple story of disadvantage and exploitation. It has opened up opportunities for some. New social and political possibilities are appearing, albeit precariously, in which people can grasp opportunities far beyond the limited scope they might previously have had. One of the aims of the Nice conference was to look at the opportunities and constraints in an objective way.

However, much of the conference was inevitably concerned with the problems migrants face, especially exploitation and the denial of their human rights and the rights that other European workers take for granted. They often work in illegal industries such as prostitution, or in building trades, domestic service, agriculture, or other activities where their rights are unlikely to be respected.

These migrants are in difficult and unstable situations. While all workers have been affected by labour market deregulation, migrants are often in a far worse situation than national labour because they can easily end up doing illegal and informal work that local people can avoid.

Conference organiser Swanie Potot from CNRS in France said: "We did not focus the conference on the neediest migrants because of some miserablist idea that only they are interesting. We did it because these people are the most extreme case of labour deregulation and are in the worst situation of anyone in the European workforce."

On December 6-8, the European Science Foundation gathered experts on all aspects of European immigration to discuss the issues it raises at the conference New Migration Dynamics: Regular and Irregular Activities on the European Labour Market, which will be held at the University of Nice Sophia Antipolis.

The conference is generated from the EUROCORES Programme for European Collaborative Research Projects (ECRP). ECRP is a response to the continuing demand from the scientific community in the countries of the SCSS's Member Organisations for funding to support responsive-mode, investigator-driven Collaborative Research Projects within all fields of social science in Europe.

For more information on the conference, please visit http://www.unice.fr/migractivities/index-EN.html

For more information on the EUROCORES Programme ECRP, please visit http://www.esf.org/activities/eurocores/programmes/ecrp.html

Thomas Lau | alfa
Further information:
http://www.unice.fr/migractivities/index-EN.html
http://www.esf.org/activities/eurocores/programmes/ecrp.html

More articles from Social Sciences:

nachricht Fixating on faces
26.01.2017 | California Institute of Technology

nachricht Internet use in class tied to lower test scores
16.12.2016 | Michigan State University

All articles from Social Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Breakthrough with a chain of gold atoms

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

Im Focus: DNA repair: a new letter in the cell alphabet

Results reveal how discoveries may be hidden in scientific “blind spots”

Cells need to repair damaged DNA in our genes to prevent the development of cancer and other diseases. Our cells therefore activate and send “repair-proteins”...

Im Focus: Dresdner scientists print tomorrow’s world

The Fraunhofer IWS Dresden and Technische Universität Dresden inaugurated their jointly operated Center for Additive Manufacturing Dresden (AMCD) with a festive ceremony on February 7, 2017. Scientists from various disciplines perform research on materials, additive manufacturing processes and innovative technologies, which build up components in a layer by layer process. This technology opens up new horizons for component design and combinations of functions. For example during fabrication, electrical conductors and sensors are already able to be additively manufactured into components. They provide information about stress conditions of a product during operation.

The 3D-printing technology, or additive manufacturing as it is often called, has long made the step out of scientific research laboratories into industrial...

Im Focus: Mimicking nature's cellular architectures via 3-D printing

Research offers new level of control over the structure of 3-D printed materials

Nature does amazing things with limited design materials. Grass, for example, can support its own weight, resist strong wind loads, and recover after being...

Im Focus: Three Magnetic States for Each Hole

Nanometer-scale magnetic perforated grids could create new possibilities for computing. Together with international colleagues, scientists from the Helmholtz Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) have shown how a cobalt grid can be reliably programmed at room temperature. In addition they discovered that for every hole ("antidot") three magnetic states can be configured. The results have been published in the journal "Scientific Reports".

Physicist Dr. Rantej Bali from the HZDR, together with scientists from Singapore and Australia, designed a special grid structure in a thin layer of cobalt in...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Booth and panel discussion – The Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings at the AAAS 2017 Annual Meeting

13.02.2017 | Event News

Complex Loading versus Hidden Reserves

10.02.2017 | Event News

International Conference on Crystal Growth in Freiburg

09.02.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Start codons in DNA may be more numerous than previously thought

21.02.2017 | Life Sciences

An alternative to opioids? Compound from marine snail is potent pain reliever

21.02.2017 | Life Sciences

Warming ponds could accelerate climate change

21.02.2017 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>