Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

F1000Research brings static research figures to life

31.07.2014

Dynamically generated images let referees and readers assess paper results 'on-the-fly'

F1000Research today published new research from Bjorn Brembs, professor of neurogenetics at the Institute of Zoology, Universitaet Regensburg, in Germany, with a proof-of-concept figure allowing readers and reviewers to run the underlying code within the online article.

This represents an important leap forward for scientific publishing, by demonstrating a completely novel framework for assessing the quality of a scholarly output.

Figure 3 in fact doesn't really exist. The authors submitted their data and their code to F1000Research, and the figure is generated 'on the fly' when the article is viewed. Readers can select the appropriate parameter to run the code and alter the figure that is generated.

The ability to adjust how data is plotted enables readers to evaluate the data for themselves, bringing scientific figures into the Internet age alongside article versioning, replication and complete transparency in the publishing process. "Ultimately, our goal is to set everything up such that we only need to submit our text with links to data and code, without ever having to fiddle with figures anymore", said Brembs.

Brembs' work suggests that naturally arising genomic differences between different stocks of the widely used animal model Drosophila melanogaster could profoundly impact on subsequent comparisons between nominally identical fly stocks.

The paper additionally includes a call for participation to other laboratories and research groups to contribute to a second proof-of-concept figure that is slated to be added to a future update of the current article. Figure 4 will enable multiple laboratories to feed in behavioral data from their local experimental setup into a single 'living' figure. The data will be generated 'on the fly' as each data stream is updated and fed into the figure. Thus readers will be able to see the evolution of the behavior of several fly strains over time.

The recent rise in retraction rates of scientific articles proves that attempts at reproducibility by other labs are crucial to cross-checking our understanding of science. With only one or two figures to choose from in the past, authors were incentivized to pick the view of the data that best demonstrated their conclusions.

"The traditional method of publishing still used by most journals today means that as a referee or reader, the data cannot be reused nor can the analysis be checked to see if all agree with the reported conclusions", said Brembs. "This slows down scientific discovery. We are pleased to be able to pioneer these two interactive figures with F1000Research, which will hopefully be the start of a big shift in the way journals treat their figures."

"The peer-reviewed journal article has been the currency of science since the 1600s, yet the pace of science publishing has amazingly not changed much", said Dr Rebecca Lawrence, Managing Director F1000Research. "We are building on our core principles of almost immediate publication, transparent refereeing and open data. We have already been the first scientific journal to enable articles to be continually updated, together with their associated data and software; now we are continuing this development for figures, enabling scientific articles to better mirror the continuous pace of scientific discovery."

For the full paper, please visit http://f1000research.com/articles/3-176/v1.

Eleanor Howell | Eurek Alert!

Further reports about: Faculty ability fly genomic differences laboratories method stocks

More articles from Science Education:

nachricht Decision-making research in children: Rules of thumb are learned with time
19.10.2016 | Max-Planck-Institut für Bildungsforschung

nachricht Young people discover the "Learning Center"
20.09.2016 | Research Center Pharmaceutical Engineering GmbH

All articles from Science Education >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Breakthrough with a chain of gold atoms

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

Im Focus: DNA repair: a new letter in the cell alphabet

Results reveal how discoveries may be hidden in scientific “blind spots”

Cells need to repair damaged DNA in our genes to prevent the development of cancer and other diseases. Our cells therefore activate and send “repair-proteins”...

Im Focus: Dresdner scientists print tomorrow’s world

The Fraunhofer IWS Dresden and Technische Universität Dresden inaugurated their jointly operated Center for Additive Manufacturing Dresden (AMCD) with a festive ceremony on February 7, 2017. Scientists from various disciplines perform research on materials, additive manufacturing processes and innovative technologies, which build up components in a layer by layer process. This technology opens up new horizons for component design and combinations of functions. For example during fabrication, electrical conductors and sensors are already able to be additively manufactured into components. They provide information about stress conditions of a product during operation.

The 3D-printing technology, or additive manufacturing as it is often called, has long made the step out of scientific research laboratories into industrial...

Im Focus: Mimicking nature's cellular architectures via 3-D printing

Research offers new level of control over the structure of 3-D printed materials

Nature does amazing things with limited design materials. Grass, for example, can support its own weight, resist strong wind loads, and recover after being...

Im Focus: Three Magnetic States for Each Hole

Nanometer-scale magnetic perforated grids could create new possibilities for computing. Together with international colleagues, scientists from the Helmholtz Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) have shown how a cobalt grid can be reliably programmed at room temperature. In addition they discovered that for every hole ("antidot") three magnetic states can be configured. The results have been published in the journal "Scientific Reports".

Physicist Dr. Rantej Bali from the HZDR, together with scientists from Singapore and Australia, designed a special grid structure in a thin layer of cobalt in...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Booth and panel discussion – The Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings at the AAAS 2017 Annual Meeting

13.02.2017 | Event News

Complex Loading versus Hidden Reserves

10.02.2017 | Event News

International Conference on Crystal Growth in Freiburg

09.02.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Biocompatible 3-D tracking system has potential to improve robot-assisted surgery

17.02.2017 | Medical Engineering

Real-time MRI analysis powered by supercomputers

17.02.2017 | Medical Engineering

Antibiotic effective against drug-resistant bacteria in pediatric skin infections

17.02.2017 | Health and Medicine

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>