Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

A revolution in knot theory

10.11.2011
In the 19th century, Lord Kelvin made the inspired guess that elements are knots in the "ether". Hydrogen would be one kind of knot, oxygen a different kind of knot---and so forth throughout the periodic table of elements.

This idea led Peter Guthrie Tait to prepare meticulous and quite beautiful tables of knots, in an effort to elucidate when two knots are truly different. From the point of view of physics, Kelvin and Tait were on the wrong track: the atomic viewpoint soon made the theory of ether obsolete. But from the mathematical viewpoint, a gold mine had been discovered: The branch of mathematics now known as "knot theory" has been burgeoning ever since.


This knot has Gauss code O1U2O3U1O2U3.
Credit: Graphic by Sam Nelson

In his article "The Combinatorial Revolution in Knot Theory", to appear in the December 2011 issue of the Notices of the AMS,, Sam Nelson describes a novel approach to knot theory that has gained currency in the past several years and the mysterious new knot-like objects discovered in the process.

As sailors have long known, many different kinds of knots are possible; in fact, the variety is infinite. A *mathematical* knot can be imagined as a knotted circle: Think of a pretzel, which is a knotted circle of dough, or a rubber band, which is the "un-knot" because it is not knotted. Mathematicians study the patterns, symmetries, and asymmetries in knots and develop methods for distinguishing when two knots are truly different.

Mathematically, one thinks of the string out of which a knot is formed as being a one-dimensional object, and the knot itself lives in three-dimensional space. Drawings of knots, like the ones done by Tait, are projections of the knot onto a two-dimensional plane. In such drawings, it is customary to draw over-and-under crossings of the string as broken and unbroken lines. If three or more strands of the knot are on top of each other at single point, we can move the strands slightly without changing the knot so that every point on the plane sits below at most two strands of the knot. A planar knot diagram is a picture of a knot, drawn in a two-dimensional plane, in which every point of the diagram represents at most two points in the knot. Planar knot diagrams have long been used in mathematics as a way to represent and study knots.

As Nelson reports in his article, mathematicians have devised various ways to represent the information contained in knot diagrams. One example is the Gauss code, which is a sequence of letters and numbers wherein each crossing in the knot is assigned a number and the letter O or U, depending on whether the crossing goes over or under. The Gauss code for a simple knot might look like this: O1U2O3U1O2U3.

In the mid-1990s, mathematicians discovered something strange. There are Gauss codes for which it is impossible to draw planar knot diagrams but which nevertheless behave like knots in certain ways. In particular, those codes, which Nelson calls *nonplanar Gauss codes*, work perfectly well in certain formulas that are used to investigate properties of knots. Nelson writes: "A planar Gauss code always describes a [knot] in three-space; what kind of thing could a nonplanar Gauss code be describing?" As it turns out, there are "virtual knots" that have legitimate Gauss codes but do not correspond to knots in three-dimensional space. These virtual knots can be investigated by applying combinatorial techniques to knot diagrams.

Just as new horizons opened when people dared to consider what would happen if -1 had a square root---and thereby discovered complex numbers, which have since been thoroughly explored by mathematicians and have become ubiquitous in physics and engineering---mathematicians are finding that the equations they used to investigate regular knots give rise to a whole universe of "generalized knots" that have their own peculiar qualities. Although they seem esoteric at first, these generalized knots turn out to have interpretations as familiar objects in mathematics. "Moreover," Nelson writes, "classical knot theory emerges as a special case of the new generalized knot theory."

Related to this subject are an upcoming issue of the Journal of Knot Theory and its Ramifications, devoted to virtual knot theory, and the upcoming Knots in Washington conference at George Washington University, December 2-4, 2011, which will focus on on "Categorification of Knots, Algebras, and Quandles; Quantum Computing".

Specific questions are best directed to the author, whose email address is given in the article. General questions can be directed to:

Mike Breen and Annette Emerson
AMS Public Awareness Office
Email: paoffice@ams.org
Telephone: 401-455-4000
Founded in 1888 to further mathematical research and scholarship, today the more than 30,000 member American Mathematical Society fulfills its mission through programs and services that promote mathematical research and its uses, strengthen mathematical education, and foster awareness and appreciation of mathematics and its connections to other disciplines and to everyday life.
American Mathematical Society
201 Charles Street
Providence, RI 02904
401-455-4000

Mike Breen | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.ams.org

More articles from Science Education:

nachricht Starting school boosts development
11.05.2017 | Max-Planck-Institut für Bildungsforschung

nachricht New Master’s programme: University of Kaiserslautern educates experts in quantum technology
15.03.2017 | Technische Universität Kaiserslautern

All articles from Science Education >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Neutron star merger directly observed for the first time

University of Maryland researchers contribute to historic detection of gravitational waves and light created by event

On August 17, 2017, at 12:41:04 UTC, scientists made the first direct observation of a merger between two neutron stars--the dense, collapsed cores that remain...

Im Focus: Breaking: the first light from two neutron stars merging

Seven new papers describe the first-ever detection of light from a gravitational wave source. The event, caused by two neutron stars colliding and merging together, was dubbed GW170817 because it sent ripples through space-time that reached Earth on 2017 August 17. Around the world, hundreds of excited astronomers mobilized quickly and were able to observe the event using numerous telescopes, providing a wealth of new data.

Previous detections of gravitational waves have all involved the merger of two black holes, a feat that won the 2017 Nobel Prize in Physics earlier this month....

Im Focus: Smart sensors for efficient processes

Material defects in end products can quickly result in failures in many areas of industry, and have a massive impact on the safe use of their products. This is why, in the field of quality assurance, intelligent, nondestructive sensor systems play a key role. They allow testing components and parts in a rapid and cost-efficient manner without destroying the actual product or changing its surface. Experts from the Fraunhofer IZFP in Saarbrücken will be presenting two exhibits at the Blechexpo in Stuttgart from 7–10 November 2017 that allow fast, reliable, and automated characterization of materials and detection of defects (Hall 5, Booth 5306).

When quality testing uses time-consuming destructive test methods, it can result in enormous costs due to damaging or destroying the products. And given that...

Im Focus: Cold molecules on collision course

Using a new cooling technique MPQ scientists succeed at observing collisions in a dense beam of cold and slow dipolar molecules.

How do chemical reactions proceed at extremely low temperatures? The answer requires the investigation of molecular samples that are cold, dense, and slow at...

Im Focus: Shrinking the proton again!

Scientists from the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics, using high precision laser spectroscopy of atomic hydrogen, confirm the surprisingly small value of the proton radius determined from muonic hydrogen.

It was one of the breakthroughs of the year 2010: Laser spectroscopy of muonic hydrogen resulted in a value for the proton charge radius that was significantly...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

ASEAN Member States discuss the future role of renewable energy

17.10.2017 | Event News

World Health Summit 2017: International experts set the course for the future of Global Health

10.10.2017 | Event News

Climate Engineering Conference 2017 Opens in Berlin

10.10.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Terahertz spectroscopy goes nano

20.10.2017 | Information Technology

Strange but true: Turning a material upside down can sometimes make it softer

20.10.2017 | Materials Sciences

NRL clarifies valley polarization for electronic and optoelectronic technologies

20.10.2017 | Interdisciplinary Research

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>