Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:


Siemens introduces the Liquipure CX continuous electrodeionization module

New product expands Siemens’ laboratory water treatment consumables/service offering

Siemens Water Technologies now offers the Liquipure CX replacement continuous electrodeionization (CEDI) module, designed as a reliable and cost-effective replacement module for Millipore’s Elix water purification systems. The Liquipure CX module, to be launched at Pittcon 2010 in Orlando, Florida, U.S.A. on February 28-March 5, uses Siemens’ proprietary Ionpure CEDI system to produce ASTM Type II water quality.

The Liquipure CX module is designed specifically for the flow rate and water quality requirements of Millipore’s Elix systems. The module is constructed of low-extractable, natural polysulfone and is packaged and assembled with connections and wiring for direct Elix module replacement, while guaranteeing leak-free operation. The Liquipure CX module is the latest addition to the Siemens portfolio of consumables and services, including a wide range of replacement cartridges and reverse osmosis membranes for competitors’ systems.

“It is essential to maintain a constant quality of water produced in the clinical, analytical, healthcare or municipal laboratory,” says Nick Armstrong, Product Manager for Health Science Solutions at Siemens Water Technologies.

“The Liquipure CX module, coupled with Siemens’ replacement consumable cartridges and comprehensive service packages, ensures that our customers’ lab water systems continue to run at peak performance for many more years.”

Elix is a trademark of Millipore Corporation. Liquipure and Ionpure are trademarks of Siemens Water Technologies Corp. or its affiliates in some countries.

Contact USA:
Karole Colangelo
Corporate Public Relations Manager
Siemens Water Technologies Corp.
2501 N. Barrington Road
Hoffman Estates, IL 60192
847-713-8458 phone
847-713-8469 fax
847-687-9630 cell
E-mail address
The Siemens Industry Sector (Erlangen, Germany) is the worldwide leading supplier of environmentally friendly production, transportation, building and lighting technologies. With integrated automation technologies and comprehensive industry-specific solutions, Siemens increases the productivity, efficiency and flexibility of its customers in the fields of industry and infrastructure. The Sector consists of six divisions: Building Technologies, Drive Technologies, Industry Automation, Industry Solutions, Mobility und Osram. With around 207,000 employees worldwide (September 30), Siemens Industry achieved in fiscal year 2009 total sales of approximately €35 billion.

The Siemens Industry Solutions Division (Erlangen, Germany) is one of the world's leading solution and service providers for industrial and infrastructure facilities comprising the business activities of Siemens VAI Metals Technologies, Water Technologies and Industrial Technologies. Activities include engineering and installation, operation and service for the entire life cycle. A wide-ranging portfolio of environmental solutions helps industrial companies to use energy, water and equipment efficiently, reduce emissions and comply with environmental guidelines. With around 31,000 employees worldwide (September 30), Siemens Industry Solutions posted sales of €6.8 billion in fiscal year 2009.

Dr. Rainer Schulze | Siemens Industry
Further information:

More articles from Process Engineering:

nachricht Etching Microstructures with Lasers
25.10.2016 | Fraunhofer-Institut für Lasertechnik ILT

nachricht Applying electron beams to 3-D objects
23.09.2016 | Fraunhofer-Institut für Organische Elektronik, Elektronenstrahl- und Plasmatechnik FEP

All articles from Process Engineering >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Etching Microstructures with Lasers

Ultrafast lasers have introduced new possibilities in engraving ultrafine structures, and scientists are now also investigating how to use them to etch microstructures into thin glass. There are possible applications in analytics (lab on a chip) and especially in electronics and the consumer sector, where great interest has been shown.

This new method was born of a surprising phenomenon: irradiating glass in a particular way with an ultrafast laser has the effect of making the glass up to a...

Im Focus: Light-driven atomic rotations excite magnetic waves

Terahertz excitation of selected crystal vibrations leads to an effective magnetic field that drives coherent spin motion

Controlling functional properties by light is one of the grand goals in modern condensed matter physics and materials science. A new study now demonstrates how...

Im Focus: New 3-D wiring technique brings scalable quantum computers closer to reality

Researchers from the Institute for Quantum Computing (IQC) at the University of Waterloo led the development of a new extensible wiring technique capable of controlling superconducting quantum bits, representing a significant step towards to the realization of a scalable quantum computer.

"The quantum socket is a wiring method that uses three-dimensional wires based on spring-loaded pins to address individual qubits," said Jeremy Béjanin, a PhD...

Im Focus: Scientists develop a semiconductor nanocomposite material that moves in response to light

In a paper in Scientific Reports, a research team at Worcester Polytechnic Institute describes a novel light-activated phenomenon that could become the basis for applications as diverse as microscopic robotic grippers and more efficient solar cells.

A research team at Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI) has developed a revolutionary, light-activated semiconductor nanocomposite material that can be used...

Im Focus: Diamonds aren't forever: Sandia, Harvard team create first quantum computer bridge

By forcefully embedding two silicon atoms in a diamond matrix, Sandia researchers have demonstrated for the first time on a single chip all the components needed to create a quantum bridge to link quantum computers together.

"People have already built small quantum computers," says Sandia researcher Ryan Camacho. "Maybe the first useful one won't be a single giant quantum computer...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>



Event News

#IC2S2: When Social Science meets Computer Science - GESIS will host the IC2S2 conference 2017

14.10.2016 | Event News

Agricultural Trade Developments and Potentials in Central Asia and the South Caucasus

14.10.2016 | Event News

World Health Summit – Day Three: A Call to Action

12.10.2016 | Event News

Latest News

How nanoscience will improve our health and lives in the coming years

27.10.2016 | Materials Sciences

OU-led team discovers rare, newborn tri-star system using ALMA

27.10.2016 | Physics and Astronomy

'Neighbor maps' reveal the genome's 3-D shape

27.10.2016 | Life Sciences

More VideoLinks >>>