Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

SCHOTT develops new manufacturing technique for its LASF35 glass

13.06.2008
Continuous production improves transmission for glass with high refractive index

Thanks to its extremely high index of refraction, LASF35 glass offers excellent properties for sophisticated lens systems used in tight spaces. By relying on a continuous production technique, SCHOTT has also optimized the internal transmission. Particularly within the blue wavelength region, this glass offers substantially better properties than comparable optical materials.


Ball lenses are used in the writing or reading heads of DVD/DVR systems, in micro technology or in fiber optics to couple or collimate optical light. With diameters of between 0.040 and 10 mm, SCHOTT AG manufactures ball lenses from various optical glasses and achieves coupling efficiencies of 75 %. Depending on the application, optical glasses such as N-BK7, but also highly refractive glasses like LASF35 with its unique refractive index of nd = 2.02, are put to use.

SCHOTT Advanced Optics, the optics division of the international technology company, will be unveiling an improved version of its LASF35 glass (nd = 2.02204; vd = 29.06) at the international trade fair “Optatec” in Frankfurt, Germany. In doing so, SCHOTT is optimizing its line of glasses that feature high refractive indexes in extreme regions of the Abbe diagram.

“Glasses with a high refractive index represent an important prerequisite for the increasing miniaturization of optical technologies,” notes Dr. Bernhard Hladik, Product Manager of Optical Glass at SCHOTT AG. “This improvement to our product portfolio will offer new potential for innovation for industrial lenses, medical technology, optoelectronics and laser technology, as well as related advanced technologies,” he adds.

LASF35 glass is particularly well-suited for miniaturized lens systems, such as those used as ball lenses or micro prisms in medical technology for endoscopes, microscopes and other micro lenses, for example.

When it comes to manufacturing, SCHOTT uses a continuous melting process and, therefore, achieves much higher internal transmission (63 % at 400 nm for a thickness of 10 mm; color code: 45/37) that truly outshines all other comparable glasses, particularly inside the blue wavelength region.

The new glass has been approved in accordance with the European Guideline 2002/95/EG (RoHS, Restriction of the use of certain hazardous substances in electrical and electronic equipment). SCHOTT is also planning to introduce a version called N-LASF35 that will be free of arsenic in the future.

SCHOTT is an international technology group that sees its core purpose as the lasting improvement of living and working conditions. To this end, the company has been developing special materials, components and systems for nearly 125 years. The main areas of focus are the household appliances industry, pharmaceuticals, solar energy, electronics, optics and the automotive industry.

The SCHOTT Group is present in close proximity to its customers with production and sales companies in all its major markets. The Group’s approximately 16,700 employees generate worldwide sales of approximately 2.1 billion euros. The company's technological and economic expertise is closely linked with its social and ecological responsibility. The parent company of the SCHOTT Group is SCHOTT AG, whose sole shareholder is the Carl-Zeiss-Stiftung (Foundation).

Contact:
SCHOTT AG
Christine Fuhr
PR Manager
Corporate Public Relations
Phone +49 (0)6131 / 66-4550
Fax +49 (0)6131 / 66-4041
E-Mail christine.fuhr@schott.com

Christine Fuhr | SCHOTT AG
Further information:
http://www.schott.com

More articles from Process Engineering:

nachricht Quick, Precise, but not Cold
17.05.2017 | Fraunhofer-Institut für Lasertechnik ILT

nachricht A laser for divers
03.05.2017 | Laser Zentrum Hannover e.V.

All articles from Process Engineering >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Abrupt motion sharpens x-ray pulses

Spectrally narrow x-ray pulses may be “sharpened” by purely mechanical means. This sounds surprisingly, but a team of theoretical and experimental physicists developed and realized such a method. It is based on fast motions, precisely synchronized with the pulses, of a target interacting with the x-ray light. Thereby, photons are redistributed within the x-ray pulse to the desired spectral region.

A team of theoretical physicists from the MPI for Nuclear Physics (MPIK) in Heidelberg has developed a novel method to intensify the spectrally broad x-ray...

Im Focus: Physicists Design Ultrafocused Pulses

Physicists working with researcher Oriol Romero-Isart devised a new simple scheme to theoretically generate arbitrarily short and focused electromagnetic fields. This new tool could be used for precise sensing and in microscopy.

Microwaves, heat radiation, light and X-radiation are examples for electromagnetic waves. Many applications require to focus the electromagnetic fields to...

Im Focus: Carbon Nanotubes Turn Electrical Current into Light-emitting Quasi-particles

Strong light-matter coupling in these semiconducting tubes may hold the key to electrically pumped lasers

Light-matter quasi-particles can be generated electrically in semiconducting carbon nanotubes. Material scientists and physicists from Heidelberg University...

Im Focus: Flexible proximity sensor creates smart surfaces

Fraunhofer IPA has developed a proximity sensor made from silicone and carbon nanotubes (CNT) which detects objects and determines their position. The materials and printing process used mean that the sensor is extremely flexible, economical and can be used for large surfaces. Industry and research partners can use and further develop this innovation straight away.

At first glance, the proximity sensor appears to be nothing special: a thin, elastic layer of silicone onto which black square surfaces are printed, but these...

Im Focus: 3-D scanning with water

3-D shape acquisition using water displacement as the shape sensor for the reconstruction of complex objects

A global team of computer scientists and engineers have developed an innovative technique that more completely reconstructs challenging 3D objects. An ancient...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Clash of Realities 2017: Registration now open. International Conference at TH Köln

26.07.2017 | Event News

Closing the Sustainability Circle: Protection of Food with Biobased Materials

21.07.2017 | Event News

»We are bringing Additive Manufacturing to SMEs«

19.07.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

New 3-D imaging reveals how human cell nucleus organizes DNA and chromatin of its genome

28.07.2017 | Health and Medicine

Heavy metals in water meet their match

28.07.2017 | Power and Electrical Engineering

Oestrogen regulates pathological changes of bones via bone lining cells

28.07.2017 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>