Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Photonic technology boosts microwave signals

18.03.2008
Researchers at Chalmers University of Technology have investigated the possibility of using fibre optic technology to generate and distribute microwave signals in future wireless networks. This technology is important to meet the increase in demand for mobility and high data rates.

Using optical fibre for the distribution of microwave signals has several benefits compared to using electrical cables. Optical fibre has low loss and frequency-independent attenuation. It is also insensitive to electromagnetic interference, low in weight, small in size and low in cost.

To meet the future demand generated by the constantly increasing number of devices that are wireless connected, and at the same time maintain full mobility and high data rates, new higher frequencies must be brought into use, as the frequency space is becoming congested.

In a new PhD thesis by Andreas Wiberg at the Photonics Laboratory at Chalmers, research is presented which deals with optical generation, modulation and distribution of signals in micro- and millimetre-wave applications. The results obtained include demonstrations of transportation of 40 GHz signals over 44 km of optical fibre modulated with 2.5 Gbit/s data, transmitted through a wireless link in a laboratory environment.

"Fibre optic solutions are particularly beneficial at high frequencies and over longer distances. Combining photonic technology and microwave applications opens up new, interesting possibilities and technical solutions," says Andreas Wiberg.

In order to also maintain sufficient coverage at high frequencies, new wireless systems with distributed antennas are required for both indoor and outdoor solutions. These antennas can be managed from a central location and with centralised control; dynamic channel allocation is possible in order to follow fluctuations in traffic load and maintain good wireless coverage.

Researchers at the Department of Microtechnology and Nanoscience at Chalmers University of Technology have investigated the possibility of using fibre optic technology to generate and distribute microwave signals for future networks with wireless Gigabit/s data rates, so-called Radio-over-Fibre.

The work by Andreas Wiberg also presents details of how several frequencies and/or frequency bands can be sent in parallel through a microwave photonic system in which optical filtering is used to separate the different frequencies. It is also shown that optical techniques could be used to generate high-frequency harmonics from electrically generated signals.

The use of photonic technology in microwave applications is referred to as Microwave Photonics and has many applications apart from communication. Microwave Photonics can also be used in analogue applications, such as reference signal generation and distribution of these signals to antenna arrays. Examples of such applications could be phase-steered radar antennas or large antenna arrays for radio astronomy.

Andreas Wiberg's thesis "Generation, Modulation, and Detection of Signals in Microwave Photonic Systems" will be defended in public on March 14, 2008.

Time: 10 am
Venue: Room A423 (Kollektorn), Kemivägen 9, Johanneberg Campus, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden

An abstract of the thesis is available in the Chalmers publication database, www.chalmers.se

For further information, please contact:
Andreas Wiberg, LicEng., MScEng., Photonics Laboratory, Department of Microtechnology and Nanoscience, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden
Tel: +46 (0)31 - 772 1611, mobile: +46 (0)70 - 218 1296
andreas.wiberg@chalmers.se
Supervisor: Professor Peter Andrekson, Photonics Laboratory, Department of Microtechnology and Nanoscience, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden
Tel: +46 (0)31 - 772 16 06
peter.andrekson@mc2.chalmers.se
The images can be downloaded on Aktuella bilder>>
http://chalmersnyheter.chalmers.se/bildermedia/bildkategori.jsp?category=212

Sofie Hebrand | idw
Further information:
http://www.vr.se

More articles from Process Engineering:

nachricht Dresdner scientists print tomorrow’s world
08.02.2017 | Fraunhofer-Institut für Werkstoff- und Strahltechnik IWS

nachricht New technology for mass-production of complex molded composite components
23.01.2017 | Evonik Industries AG

All articles from Process Engineering >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Breakthrough with a chain of gold atoms

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

Im Focus: DNA repair: a new letter in the cell alphabet

Results reveal how discoveries may be hidden in scientific “blind spots”

Cells need to repair damaged DNA in our genes to prevent the development of cancer and other diseases. Our cells therefore activate and send “repair-proteins”...

Im Focus: Dresdner scientists print tomorrow’s world

The Fraunhofer IWS Dresden and Technische Universität Dresden inaugurated their jointly operated Center for Additive Manufacturing Dresden (AMCD) with a festive ceremony on February 7, 2017. Scientists from various disciplines perform research on materials, additive manufacturing processes and innovative technologies, which build up components in a layer by layer process. This technology opens up new horizons for component design and combinations of functions. For example during fabrication, electrical conductors and sensors are already able to be additively manufactured into components. They provide information about stress conditions of a product during operation.

The 3D-printing technology, or additive manufacturing as it is often called, has long made the step out of scientific research laboratories into industrial...

Im Focus: Mimicking nature's cellular architectures via 3-D printing

Research offers new level of control over the structure of 3-D printed materials

Nature does amazing things with limited design materials. Grass, for example, can support its own weight, resist strong wind loads, and recover after being...

Im Focus: Three Magnetic States for Each Hole

Nanometer-scale magnetic perforated grids could create new possibilities for computing. Together with international colleagues, scientists from the Helmholtz Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) have shown how a cobalt grid can be reliably programmed at room temperature. In addition they discovered that for every hole ("antidot") three magnetic states can be configured. The results have been published in the journal "Scientific Reports".

Physicist Dr. Rantej Bali from the HZDR, together with scientists from Singapore and Australia, designed a special grid structure in a thin layer of cobalt in...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Booth and panel discussion – The Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings at the AAAS 2017 Annual Meeting

13.02.2017 | Event News

Complex Loading versus Hidden Reserves

10.02.2017 | Event News

International Conference on Crystal Growth in Freiburg

09.02.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Stingless bees have their nests protected by soldiers

24.02.2017 | Life Sciences

New risk factors for anxiety disorders

24.02.2017 | Life Sciences

MWC 2017: 5G Capital Berlin

24.02.2017 | Trade Fair News

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>