Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

First Use of a Membrane Bioreactor with Reverse Osmosis in the Pulp and Paper Industry anywhere in the World

07.03.2008
Siemens Solution Reduces Volume of Wastewater at German Board Producer by 90 Per Cent

The Siemens Industry Solutions Division (IS) has received an order from Albert Köhler GmbH & Co. KG in Gengenbach, Germany, to install a membrane bioreactor plant with downstream reverse osmosis for wastewater treatment.


Computer-animated image of the wastewater treatment plant

This means the German board producer will be the first company in the world to have such a capability at its disposal. The system will enable almost all the process water to be reused and will reduce the volume of wastewater by some 90 per cent. Not only that: the Siemens solution will reduce the need for process steam and thus cut energy costs. The new wastewater treatment plant is due to be commissioned as soon as the spring of 2008.

Albert Köhler GmbH & Co. KG, based in Gengenbach, Baden-Württemberg, employs 120 people and uses a Fourdrinier machine and two cylinder wrap machines to produce about 40,000 tonnes of high-quality board each year for folders, books and packaging, for the automotive industry, the construction sector and the woodworking industry and for advertising and display products. In order to counter the cost pressure from rising energy costs and water charges while at the same time reducing environmental impact, in June 2007 Albert Köhler GmbH commissioned Siemens to investigate the potential of a wastewater treatment system using a membrane bioreactor (MBR) with integrated partial flow treatment as part of a pilot project.

Following the successful conclusion of the pilot phase, this solution concept will now be implemented for the entire wastewater treatment system at Albert Köhler. For this, the wastewater is first cooled by means of a plate heat-exchanger system downstream of the existing primary treatment stage. The wastewater then passes into the biological clarification plant. This consists of an aerobic stage with three cascades and is operated with an activated sludge concentration of 8-10 g/l. A membrane operating system (MOS) serves as the separating facility. Activated sludge and air are injected here using the MemJet process. The resultant optimized flow to the membranes causes intensive cleaning of the membrane surface in ongoing operation, which helps achieve higher specific throughput rates and longer cleaning intervals. This means that the membranes can also be operated efficiently and economically at high CaCO3 loadings and sludge concentrations – key prerequisites for use in the paper and pulp industry, where polluting loads are high.

The MOS system consists of three parallel lines, which allows fully automatic cleaning of the membranes during operation without causing any changes to the hydraulics. A partial flow treatment stage with reverse osmosis (RO) is installed downstream of the MBR plant. Its purpose is desalination of the wastewater. As a result it is possible to return 90 per cent of all the wastewater to production with no loss of quality in the product. The ultrafiltrated wastewater is piped via an interim tank and a pumping station back to the existing fresh water reservoir. From there, the treated water is distributed through the production system together with the fresh water (supplementary water).

The mechanical engineering and all the plant technology is being produced in a containerized design, accommodated in six container modules. This will enable construction to be completed in only two months. Installation work on site will therefore be reduced to establishing the links between the modules and integrating the activation stage. As well as turnkey delivery of the new wastewater treatment plant, Siemens is also responsible for approval planning, engineering and construction of the plant.

In addition to reducing expenditure on fresh water and wastewater, the Siemens solution will also make a significant contribution to conserving energy. Because the process water can be largely reused, less steam needs to be produced in the power plant. This reduces both fuel costs and CO2 emissions from the plant.

The comprehensive wastewater treatment solution with the key core technologies of a membrane bioreactor with integrated ultrafiltration and downstream reverse osmosis plant constitutes an innovation in the paper industry which has never been implemented before in this form anywhere in the world. The system allows for an optimum combination of economic efficiency and environmental protection. For that very reason the German Federal Environment Agency has recommended its inclusion in the program run by the Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety (BMU) to promote investment in demonstration projects designed to reduce environmental impact.

The Siemens Industry Sector (Erlangen, Germany) is the world's leading supplier of production, transportation and building systems. Integrated hardware and software technologies combined with comprehensive industry-specific solutions enable Siemens to enhance the productivity and efficiency of its customers in industry and infrastructure. The Sector comprises six Divisions: Building Technologies, Industry Automation, Industry Solutions, Mobility, Drive Technologies and Osram. In fiscal 2007 (ended September 30), Siemens Industry generated sales of approximately EUR40 billion (pro forma, unconsolidated) with around 209,000 employees worldwide.

With the business activities of Siemens VAI Metal Technologies, (Linz, Austria), Siemens Water Technologies (Warrendale, Pa., U.S.A.), and Industry Technologies, (Erlangen, Germany), the Siemens Industry Solutions Division (Erlangen, Germany) is one of the world's leading solution and service providers for industrial and infrastructure facilities. Using its own products, systems and process technologies, Industry Solutions develops and builds plants for end customers, commissions them and provides support during their entire life cycle.

Dr. Rainer Schulze | Siemens Industry
Further information:
http://www.siemens.com/paper
http://www.siemens.com/industry
http://www.industry.siemens.com

More articles from Process Engineering:

nachricht No compromises: Combining the benefits of 3D printing and casting
23.03.2018 | Fraunhofer-Institut für Produktionstechnik und Automatisierung IPA

nachricht Intelligent wheelchairs, predictive prostheses
20.12.2017 | Fraunhofer-Institut für Produktionstechnik und Automatisierung IPA

All articles from Process Engineering >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: BAM@Hannover Messe: innovative 3D printing method for space flight

At the Hannover Messe 2018, the Bundesanstalt für Materialforschung und-prüfung (BAM) will show how, in the future, astronauts could produce their own tools or spare parts in zero gravity using 3D printing. This will reduce, weight and transport costs for space missions. Visitors can experience the innovative additive manufacturing process live at the fair.

Powder-based additive manufacturing in zero gravity is the name of the project in which a component is produced by applying metallic powder layers and then...

Im Focus: Molecules Brilliantly Illuminated

Physicists at the Laboratory for Attosecond Physics, which is jointly run by Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität and the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics, have developed a high-power laser system that generates ultrashort pulses of light covering a large share of the mid-infrared spectrum. The researchers envisage a wide range of applications for the technology – in the early diagnosis of cancer, for instance.

Molecules are the building blocks of life. Like all other organisms, we are made of them. They control our biorhythm, and they can also reflect our state of...

Im Focus: Spider silk key to new bone-fixing composite

University of Connecticut researchers have created a biodegradable composite made of silk fibers that can be used to repair broken load-bearing bones without the complications sometimes presented by other materials.

Repairing major load-bearing bones such as those in the leg can be a long and uncomfortable process.

Im Focus: Writing and deleting magnets with lasers

Study published in the journal ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces is the outcome of an international effort that included teams from Dresden and Berlin in Germany, and the US.

Scientists at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) together with colleagues from the Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin (HZB) and the University of Virginia...

Im Focus: Gamma-ray flashes from plasma filaments

Novel highly efficient and brilliant gamma-ray source: Based on model calculations, physicists of the Max PIanck Institute for Nuclear Physics in Heidelberg propose a novel method for an efficient high-brilliance gamma-ray source. A giant collimated gamma-ray pulse is generated from the interaction of a dense ultra-relativistic electron beam with a thin solid conductor. Energetic gamma-rays are copiously produced as the electron beam splits into filaments while propagating across the conductor. The resulting gamma-ray energy and flux enable novel experiments in nuclear and fundamental physics.

The typical wavelength of light interacting with an object of the microcosm scales with the size of this object. For atoms, this ranges from visible light to...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

Invitation to the upcoming "Current Topics in Bioinformatics: Big Data in Genomics and Medicine"

13.04.2018 | Event News

Unique scope of UV LED technologies and applications presented in Berlin: ICULTA-2018

12.04.2018 | Event News

IWOLIA: A conference bringing together German Industrie 4.0 and French Industrie du Futur

09.04.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Getting electrons to move in a semiconductor

25.04.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

Reconstructing what makes us tick

25.04.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

Cheap 3-D printer can produce self-folding materials

25.04.2018 | Information Technology

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>