Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Terahertz Goes Nano

10.10.2008
A forthcoming report in Nano Letters describes a breakthrough in modern microscopy: the achievement of extremely high-resolution imaging using light in the Terahertz (THz) region (wavelengths between 30 and 1000 µm).

Contrary to textbook wisdom, the unusually long illuminating wavelength of 118 µm did not at all preclude researchers from the Max-Planck-Institute of Biochemistry (MPIB) to resolve details as small as 40 nm (= 0.04 µm).

This was made possible by the use of extreme THz field concentration at the sharp tip of a scanning atomic force microscope (AFM). The THz nanoscope thus breaks the diffraction barrier by a factor of 1500, and with its 40 nm resolving power matches the needs of modern nanoscience and technology. As a first application, the researchers demonstrate the mapping of free-carriers in state-of-the-art industrial transistors of the 65 nm-technology.

The MPIB team had pioneered near-field microscopy at both visible and infrared frequencies over the last decade, enabling nanoscale resolved chemical recognition of nanostructured materials. Only recently they realized, when imaging semiconducting nanostructures of state-of-the art processor chips, the importance of using far-infrared or THz radiation (the 118 µm wavelength radiation corresponds to 2.5 THz). THz illumination offers a 100-fold increased sensitivity to the conductivity of semiconducting materials when compared to infrared light. This extreme sensitivity is difficult to achieve by any other optical microscopy technique, rendering the described microscopy technique highly desirable for quality assurance and analysis of failure mechanisms in industrially produced semiconductor nanodevices.

An external theory collaborator (Javier Aizpurua, Donostia International Physics Center, Spain) joined the MPIB team to help predicting that indeed the long-wavelength THz radiation would develop a highly concentrated field right at the end of the scanning tip. With this assurance, the MPIB team set out to illuminate their home-built near-field microscope with 2.5 THz radiation from a gas laser. Doctoral student Andreas Huber succeeded to record the first THz images with 40 nm resolution. In collaboration with Infineon Technologies AG (Jesper Wittborn, München) he applied the new microscopy technique to characterize state-of-the-art transistors of the 65 nm-technology that before had been inspected with a transmission electron microscope (TEM). Comparing THz and TEM images of the transistors, the researchers could demonstrate that all major parts of the transistor (source, drain and gate) can be seen in the THz image. Strikingly, the THz images reveal mobile carrier concentrations around 1018cm-3 (that is one mobile carrier for each 100,000 Si atoms) which are essential for functional transistor devices. Mobile carriers are a central key for the practical transistor functionality but unfortunately they are not directly visible in TEM.

Hitherto, no powerful metrology tools are available allowing for simultaneous and quantitative mapping of both materials and carrier concentrations with nanoscale resolution. Therefore, the added values of seeing and even quantifying conducting carriers opens an enormous application potential for the THz near-field microscope. In fundamental physics research of conducting materials, the non-contact, non-invasive and quantitative mapping of mobile carriers with nanoscale resolution should trigger crucial insights into open scientific questions from the areas of superconductors, low-dimensional conductors, and correlated conductors. "After 40 years of THz research in three Max-Planck-Institutes I am now looking forward to THz nanoscopy solving basic conduction puzzles such as superconductivity" says Fritz Keilmann. THz nanosopy could be furthermore an interesting tool for chemical and structural analysis of compounds and biological systems, as THz radiation is also highly sensitive to vibrations of crystal lattices and molecules. "Future improvements of our technique could allow for THz characterization of even single nanocrystals, biomolecules or electrons" says Rainer Hillenbrand, leader of the Nano-Photonics Group at MPIB and the Nanooptics Laboratory at the newly established nanoGUNE research center (San Sebastian, Spain).

The demonstrated achievement is the direct outcome of a research plan subsidized since 2003 within a Nanofutur grant of the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research endowed to Rainer Hillenbrand. The plan had already anticipated a start-up company which indeed was founded in 2007 (Neaspec GmbH).

Original publication:
A. J. Huber, F. Keilmann, J. Wittborn, J. Aizpurua and R. Hillenbrand, Terahertz Near-Field Nanoscopy of Mobile Carriers in Single Semiconductor Nanodevices, Nano Letters, DOI: 10.1021/nl802086x (2008).
Contact:
Dr. Rainer Hillenbrand
hillenbr@biochem.mpg.de
Nanooptics Laboratory
CIC nanoGUNE Consolider
20009 Donostia - San Sebastian, Spain
and
Nano-Photonics Group
Max-Planck-Institut für Biochemie
82152 Martinsried, Germany
phone: +49 89 8578 2455

Eva-Maria Diehl | Max-Planck-Gesellschaft
Further information:
http://www.biochem.mpg.de/hillenbrand

More articles from Physics and Astronomy:

nachricht Mars 2020 mission to use smart methods to seek signs of past life
17.08.2017 | Goldschmidt Conference

nachricht Gold shines through properties of nano biosensors
17.08.2017 | American Institute of Physics

All articles from Physics and Astronomy >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Fizzy soda water could be key to clean manufacture of flat wonder material: Graphene

Whether you call it effervescent, fizzy, or sparkling, carbonated water is making a comeback as a beverage. Aside from quenching thirst, researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have discovered a new use for these "bubbly" concoctions that will have major impact on the manufacturer of the world's thinnest, flattest, and one most useful materials -- graphene.

As graphene's popularity grows as an advanced "wonder" material, the speed and quality at which it can be manufactured will be paramount. With that in mind,...

Im Focus: Exotic quantum states made from light: Physicists create optical “wells” for a super-photon

Physicists at the University of Bonn have managed to create optical hollows and more complex patterns into which the light of a Bose-Einstein condensate flows. The creation of such highly low-loss structures for light is a prerequisite for complex light circuits, such as for quantum information processing for a new generation of computers. The researchers are now presenting their results in the journal Nature Photonics.

Light particles (photons) occur as tiny, indivisible portions. Many thousands of these light portions can be merged to form a single super-photon if they are...

Im Focus: Circular RNA linked to brain function

For the first time, scientists have shown that circular RNA is linked to brain function. When a RNA molecule called Cdr1as was deleted from the genome of mice, the animals had problems filtering out unnecessary information – like patients suffering from neuropsychiatric disorders.

While hundreds of circular RNAs (circRNAs) are abundant in mammalian brains, one big question has remained unanswered: What are they actually good for? In the...

Im Focus: RAVAN CubeSat measures Earth's outgoing energy

An experimental small satellite has successfully collected and delivered data on a key measurement for predicting changes in Earth's climate.

The Radiometer Assessment using Vertically Aligned Nanotubes (RAVAN) CubeSat was launched into low-Earth orbit on Nov. 11, 2016, in order to test new...

Im Focus: Scientists shine new light on the “other high temperature superconductor”

A study led by scientists of the Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter (MPSD) at the Center for Free-Electron Laser Science in Hamburg presents evidence of the coexistence of superconductivity and “charge-density-waves” in compounds of the poorly-studied family of bismuthates. This observation opens up new perspectives for a deeper understanding of the phenomenon of high-temperature superconductivity, a topic which is at the core of condensed matter research since more than 30 years. The paper by Nicoletti et al has been published in the PNAS.

Since the beginning of the 20th century, superconductivity had been observed in some metals at temperatures only a few degrees above the absolute zero (minus...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Call for Papers – ICNFT 2018, 5th International Conference on New Forming Technology

16.08.2017 | Event News

Sustainability is the business model of tomorrow

04.08.2017 | Event News

Clash of Realities 2017: Registration now open. International Conference at TH Köln

26.07.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Gold shines through properties of nano biosensors

17.08.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Greenland ice flow likely to speed up: New data assert glaciers move over sediment, which gets more slippery as it gets wetter

17.08.2017 | Earth Sciences

Mars 2020 mission to use smart methods to seek signs of past life

17.08.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>