Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Gold nano anchors put nanowires in their place

11.11.2004


Researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have demonstrated a technique for growing well-formed, single-crystal nanowires in place---and in a predictable orientation---on a commercially important substrate.

The method uses nanoparticles of gold arranged in rows on a sapphire surface as starting points for growing horizontal semiconductor "wires" only 3 nanometers (nm) in diameter. Other methods produce semiconductor nanowires more than 10 nm in diameter. NIST chemists’ work was highlighted in the Oct. 11 issue of Applied Physics Letters.

Part of the vision of nanotechnology is the possibility of building powerful, extraordinarily compact sensors and other devices out of atomic-scale components. So-called "nanowires"---long thin crystals of, e.g., a semiconductor--- could not only link nanoelectronic devices like conventional wire but also function as devices themselves, tipped with photodetector or light-emitting elements, for example.



An obvious stumbling block is the problem of working with components so small that only the most sophisticated measurement instruments can even track them. To date, the most successful nanowire alignment method involved growing large numbers of the rod-like crystals on a suitable base like blades of grass, shearing them off, mixing them in a solvent, and forcing them to align by either flow or surface confinement on the test substrate to orient most of the crystals in a specific horizontal direction. Further photolithography steps are required to ensure that nanowires are positioned correctly.

In contrast, the NIST technique grows arrays of nanowires made of zinc oxide, a semiconductor widely used in optoelectronics, with precise alignments. The gold "anchors" are placed with a chemical etching step and the orientation of the wires--horizontal, vertical or at a 60 degree angle from the surface--is determined by tweaking the size of the gold particles.

Michael Baum | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.nist.gov

More articles from Physics and Astronomy:

nachricht Prediction: More gas-giants will be found orbiting Sun-like stars
22.02.2017 | Carnegie Institution for Science

nachricht NASA's fermi finds possible dark matter ties in andromeda galaxy
22.02.2017 | NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

All articles from Physics and Astronomy >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Breakthrough with a chain of gold atoms

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

Im Focus: DNA repair: a new letter in the cell alphabet

Results reveal how discoveries may be hidden in scientific “blind spots”

Cells need to repair damaged DNA in our genes to prevent the development of cancer and other diseases. Our cells therefore activate and send “repair-proteins”...

Im Focus: Dresdner scientists print tomorrow’s world

The Fraunhofer IWS Dresden and Technische Universität Dresden inaugurated their jointly operated Center for Additive Manufacturing Dresden (AMCD) with a festive ceremony on February 7, 2017. Scientists from various disciplines perform research on materials, additive manufacturing processes and innovative technologies, which build up components in a layer by layer process. This technology opens up new horizons for component design and combinations of functions. For example during fabrication, electrical conductors and sensors are already able to be additively manufactured into components. They provide information about stress conditions of a product during operation.

The 3D-printing technology, or additive manufacturing as it is often called, has long made the step out of scientific research laboratories into industrial...

Im Focus: Mimicking nature's cellular architectures via 3-D printing

Research offers new level of control over the structure of 3-D printed materials

Nature does amazing things with limited design materials. Grass, for example, can support its own weight, resist strong wind loads, and recover after being...

Im Focus: Three Magnetic States for Each Hole

Nanometer-scale magnetic perforated grids could create new possibilities for computing. Together with international colleagues, scientists from the Helmholtz Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) have shown how a cobalt grid can be reliably programmed at room temperature. In addition they discovered that for every hole ("antidot") three magnetic states can be configured. The results have been published in the journal "Scientific Reports".

Physicist Dr. Rantej Bali from the HZDR, together with scientists from Singapore and Australia, designed a special grid structure in a thin layer of cobalt in...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Booth and panel discussion – The Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings at the AAAS 2017 Annual Meeting

13.02.2017 | Event News

Complex Loading versus Hidden Reserves

10.02.2017 | Event News

International Conference on Crystal Growth in Freiburg

09.02.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Viruses support photosynthesis in bacteria – an evolutionary advantage?

23.02.2017 | Life Sciences

Researchers pave the way for ionotronic nanodevices

23.02.2017 | Power and Electrical Engineering

Microhotplates for a smart gas sensor

22.02.2017 | Power and Electrical Engineering

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>