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Knowledge transfer exhibition to show Scotland is leading the charge

13.02.2008
How does physics research impact the world we live in? A knowledge transfer exhibition and conference, to take place on Wednesday, February 27, 2008, in Glasgow, will show how world-class physics research starts in the laboratory and then becomes part of our everyday lives.

Since the Scottish Universities Physics Alliance (SUPA) was established in 2005, the eight universities have worked together to enhance their knowledge transfer networks and ensure that businesses in Scotland, the UK and around the world are making the very most of the excellent research being undertaken.

The showcase, part-sponsored by the Institute of Physics, will include 30 exhibitions and a range of speeches from experts in knowledge transfer.

Exhibitions include:

An artificial retina. Advances in microelectronics have made it possible for SUPA researchers to begin manufacturing a device a few millimetres in diameter which can be implanted into the inner surface of the retina to help those suffering with degenerative retinal disease.

Flexible, and wearable, solar panels. Solar panels are usually heavy, rigid and vulnerable to damage. A new company, Power Textiles Limited is exploiting SUPA research which has made it possible to weave solar panels thin-films into fabrics. Incorporating ‘solar panels’ into fabrics is an exciting development for renewable energy targets and Scotland’s large textiles industry.

Plasters that can help cure skin cancer. Lumicure Ltd is advancing SUPA research to make photodynamic therapy, a therapy used to cure skin cancer which can be highly unpleasant, much less intrusive. The company has developed light-weight, flat, light-emitting panels powered by small batteries which can be worn like a sticking plaster to destroy skin cancer cells.

Speakers at the event include the chair of the Pan-European network of knowledge transfer offices, a senior director of Scottish Enterprise and the executive director of the Institute of Knowledge Transfer. There will also be presentations by senior industry executives and academics giving their views of knowledge transfer.

Ian Halliday, chief executive of SUPA, said, “All of the exhibitions at SUPA KT show how examples of research being undertaken in Scotland have a tremendous potential for changing the way we live. Visiting the exhibition will give you direct access to front line academics who manage the facilities and generate results with real value to business.”

Charlie Wallace | alfa
Further information:
http://www.supa.ac.uk

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