Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

All segments of first light-generating system installed in world’s brightest X-ray laser

01.03.2016

In the metropolitan area of Hamburg, the installation of the 35 segments of the first of three X-ray light producing components of the European XFEL has been completed. Set into one of the facility’s tunnels, the segments are the core part of three systems called undulators, which are each up to 210 metres long and will produce X-ray laser light exceeding the intensity of conventional X-ray sources by a billion times. These pulses of X-ray radiation are the basis for new revolutionary experimental techniques that will allow scientists to study the nanocosmos, with applications in many fields including biochemistry, astrophysics, and materials science.

The undulator installation is a major step towards the completion of the European XFEL, a 3.4 km-long X-ray free-electron laser facility that will be the world’s brightest X-ray source when completed. It is also one of Europe’s largest research projects and is due to open to users for research in 2017.


Undulator segments in the photon tunnel on 11 January 2016

“With the 35 segments of the first undulator beam line in place, we have clearly reached a very important milestone in the construction of our facility”, says European XFEL Managing Director Prof. Massimo Altarelli. “The X-ray flashes produced in these systems are the basis for the future research at the European XFEL. We are looking forward to 2017, when they will be used to investigate the smallest details of the structure and function of matter in the molecular world.”

Each of the 35 segments is 5 m long, weighs 7.5 t, and is composed of two girders facing one another, each holding a line of alternating strong permanent magnets. When accelerated electrons pass through the field of alternating polarity generated by the magnets, ultrashort flashes of X-ray laser light are produced. Components between adjacent segments help ensure a consistent magnetic field between them, and control systems allow mechanical movement of components within the undulator, which allows generation of a large spectrum of photon wavelengths.

Design, development, and prototyping work started approximately eight years ago in a joint collaboration with DESY, European XFEL’s largest shareholder. The same technology is also used in a number of projects at DESY, including the X-ray free-electron laser FLASH and the PETRA III storage ring light source.

The undulator system was built through a multinational collaboration. The challenging production involved DESY and Russian, German, Swiss, Italian, Slovenian, Swedish, and Chinese institutes and companies under the leadership of the undulator group of the European XFEL. This includes a number in-kind contributions such as electromagnets for the electron beamline designed and manufactured at several institutes in Russia and tested in Sweden; temperature monitoring units from the Manne Siegbahn Laboratory in Sweden; and movers, phase shifters, and control systems designed and manufactured by the research centre CIEMAT in Spain.

“This was a true synergetic collaboration”, says Joachim Pflüger, group leader of the European XFEL undulator group. “The resources and experience of DESY were essential for the development of the undulator systems. Now there is a great mutual benefit!”

This first completed undulator will generate short-wavelength “hard” X-rays that will be used for experiments with a focus on structural biology and ultrafast chemistry. All three of the undulators planned for the starting phase of the European XFEL will be operational by the end of 2016.

About European XFEL

The European XFEL, currently under construction in the Hamburg area, will be an international research facility of superlatives: 27 000 X-ray flashes per second and a brilliance that is a billion times higher than that of the best conventional X-ray sources will open up completely new opportunities for science. Research groups from around the world will be able to map the atomic details of viruses, decipher the molecular composition of cells, take three-dimensional “photos” of the nanoworld, “film” chemical reactions, and study processes such as those occurring deep inside planets. The construction and operation of the facility is entrusted to the European XFEL GmbH, a non-profit company that cooperates closely with the research centre DESY and other organizations worldwide. By the time the facility starts user operation in 2017, the company will have a workforce of about 280 employees. With construction and commissioning costs of 1.22 billion euro (at 2005 price levels) and a total length of 3.4 kilometres, the European XFEL is one of the largest and most ambitious European research projects to date. At present, 11 countries have signed the European XFEL convention: Denmark, France, Germany, Hungary, Italy, Poland, Russia, Slovakia, Spain, Sweden, and Switzerland.

Press contact:

Dr. Bernd Ebeling
+49 40 8998 6921
+49 40 8998 2020 Fax
press@xfel.eu

Weitere Informationen:

https://media.xfel.eu/XFELmediabank/?l=en&c=14087 Pictures of the undulator segments
http://www.xfel.eu More about European XFEL

Dr. Bernd Ebeling | idw - Informationsdienst Wissenschaft
Further information:
http://www.xfel.eu

More articles from Physics and Astronomy:

nachricht From rocks in Colorado, evidence of a 'chaotic solar system'
23.02.2017 | University of Wisconsin-Madison

nachricht Prediction: More gas-giants will be found orbiting Sun-like stars
22.02.2017 | Carnegie Institution for Science

All articles from Physics and Astronomy >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Safe glide at total engine failure with ELA-inside

On January 15, 2009, Chesley B. Sullenberger was celebrated world-wide: after the two engines had failed due to bird strike, he and his flight crew succeeded after a glide flight with an Airbus A320 in ditching on the Hudson River. All 155 people on board were saved.

On January 15, 2009, Chesley B. Sullenberger was celebrated world-wide: after the two engines had failed due to bird strike, he and his flight crew succeeded...

Im Focus: Breakthrough with a chain of gold atoms

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

Im Focus: DNA repair: a new letter in the cell alphabet

Results reveal how discoveries may be hidden in scientific “blind spots”

Cells need to repair damaged DNA in our genes to prevent the development of cancer and other diseases. Our cells therefore activate and send “repair-proteins”...

Im Focus: Dresdner scientists print tomorrow’s world

The Fraunhofer IWS Dresden and Technische Universität Dresden inaugurated their jointly operated Center for Additive Manufacturing Dresden (AMCD) with a festive ceremony on February 7, 2017. Scientists from various disciplines perform research on materials, additive manufacturing processes and innovative technologies, which build up components in a layer by layer process. This technology opens up new horizons for component design and combinations of functions. For example during fabrication, electrical conductors and sensors are already able to be additively manufactured into components. They provide information about stress conditions of a product during operation.

The 3D-printing technology, or additive manufacturing as it is often called, has long made the step out of scientific research laboratories into industrial...

Im Focus: Mimicking nature's cellular architectures via 3-D printing

Research offers new level of control over the structure of 3-D printed materials

Nature does amazing things with limited design materials. Grass, for example, can support its own weight, resist strong wind loads, and recover after being...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Booth and panel discussion – The Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings at the AAAS 2017 Annual Meeting

13.02.2017 | Event News

Complex Loading versus Hidden Reserves

10.02.2017 | Event News

International Conference on Crystal Growth in Freiburg

09.02.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

New pop-up strategy inspired by cuts, not folds

27.02.2017 | Materials Sciences

Sandia uses confined nanoparticles to improve hydrogen storage materials performance

27.02.2017 | Interdisciplinary Research

Decoding the genome's cryptic language

27.02.2017 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>