Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:


Tissue Testing During Breast Cancer Lumpectomies Prevents Need for Reoperation 96 Percent of Time


Real-time tissue analysis gives Mayo Clinic much lower reoperation numbers than national rate

Unique laboratory testing during breast cancer lumpectomies to make sure surgeons remove all cancerous tissue spares patients the need for a repeat lumpectomy in roughly 96 percent of cases at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, a success rate much higher than the rate nationally, a Mayo study shows.

During the years reviewed, 13.2 percent of breast cancer lumpectomy patients nationally had to return to the operating room within a month of their initial surgery, compared to 3.6 percent at Mayo in Rochester, which uses a technique called frozen section analysis to test excised tissue for cancer while  patient are still on the operating table. The findings are published in the journal Surgery.

... more about:
»Cancer »Frozen »Improvement »Quality »Testing »Time »Tissue »women

Frozen section analysis was pioneered at Mayo Clinic more than 100 years ago and is used in a variety of Mayo surgeries.

In breast cancer lumpectomies, surgeons remove tumors with a small amount of normal tissue around them to help ensure they excised all of the cancer. This is known as obtaining “clean” or “negative” margins. During surgery at Mayo in Rochester, that tissue is transferred from the operating room to a nearby pathology lab, where the edges around the lumpectomy are shaved and each sample is frozen and reviewed under a microscope by a pathologist, all within minutes, while the patient is still anesthetized.

The pathologist immediately gives the surgeon the results, so the surgeon knows whether the lumpectomy is complete or there is still cancerous tissue to remove, and at which margin, before the operation concludes.

Mayo Clinic remains one of the only U.S. medical centers to perform frozen section analysis, and its process is unique, including use of a Mayo-modified microtome to freeze tissue so the pathologist can get a 360-degree view around the lumpectomy cavity.

“This intense pathological evaluation with the use of frozen section of the margins while the patient is asleep really drops down the re-excision rate,” says first author Judy Boughey, M.D., a breast surgeon in  the Mayo Clinic Cancer Center. “Achieving negative margins in one operation has a huge impact on the patient’s satisfaction, decreases time away from work, time traveling back and forth to hospital appointments, and the financial cost to the patient, the insurance company and the hospital for a second operation.”

Mayo researchers compared 30-day reoperation rates for breast cancer lumpectomy patients at Mayo Clinic in Rochester with the reoperation rates for such patients at hospitals nationally as reported in American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program data from 2006-10.

Patients in the national data were roughly four times likelier to undergo reoperation as those at Mayo in Rochester. The 30-day reoperation rate after lumpectomy for cancer was 13.2 percent nationally and 3.6 percent at Mayo in Rochester, the analysis found.

Unlike mastectomy — breast removal — a breast cancer lumpectomy typically preserves enough breast tissue to achieve an acceptable cosmetic result. Most women diagnosed with breast cancer have a choice between a lumpectomy and a mastectomy. However, women who have a lumpectomy and later learn another operation is needed to obtain negative margins may decide to get a mastectomy at that point, Dr. Boughey says.

The study’s senior author is Elizabeth Habermann, Ph.D., associate scientific director of the Surgical Outcomes Program in the Mayo Clinic Kern Center for the Science of Health Care Delivery. Mayo Clinic funded the research.

Sharon Theimer | EurekAlert!
Further information:

Further reports about: Cancer Frozen Improvement Quality Testing Time Tissue women

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht ARTORG and Inselspital develop artificial pancreas
26.11.2015 | Universitätsspital Bern

nachricht Laboratory study: Scientists from Cologne explore a new approach to prevent newborn epilepsies
24.11.2015 | Deutsches Zentrum für Neurodegenerative Erkrankungen e.V. (DZNE)

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Climate study finds evidence of global shift in the 1980s

Planet Earth experienced a global climate shift in the late 1980s on an unprecedented scale, fuelled by anthropogenic warming and a volcanic eruption, according to new research published this week.

Scientists say that a major step change, or ‘regime shift’, in the Earth’s biophysical systems, from the upper atmosphere to the depths of the ocean and from...

Im Focus: Innovative Photovoltaics – from the Lab to the Façade

Fraunhofer ISE Demonstrates New Cell and Module Technologies on its Outer Building Façade

The Fraunhofer Institute for Solar Energy Systems ISE has installed 70 photovoltaic modules on the outer façade of one of its lab buildings. The modules were...

Im Focus: Lactate for Brain Energy

Nerve cells cover their high energy demand with glucose and lactate. Scientists of the University of Zurich now provide new support for this. They show for the first time in the intact mouse brain evidence for an exchange of lactate between different brain cells. With this study they were able to confirm a 20-year old hypothesis.

In comparison to other organs, the human brain has the highest energy requirements. The supply of energy for nerve cells and the particular role of lactic acid...

Im Focus: Laser process simulation available as app for first time

In laser material processing, the simulation of processes has made great strides over the past few years. Today, the software can predict relatively well what will happen on the workpiece. Unfortunately, it is also highly complex and requires a lot of computing time. Thanks to clever simplification, experts from Fraunhofer ILT are now able to offer the first-ever simulation software that calculates processes in real time and also runs on tablet computers and smartphones. The fast software enables users to do without expensive experiments and to find optimum process parameters even more effectively.

Before now, the reliable simulation of laser processes was a job for experts. Armed with sophisticated software packages and after many hours on computer...

Im Focus: Quantum Simulation: A Better Understanding of Magnetism

Heidelberg physicists use ultracold atoms to imitate the behaviour of electrons in a solid

Researchers at Heidelberg University have devised a new way to study the phenomenon of magnetism. Using ultracold atoms at near absolute zero, they prepared a...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>



Event News

Fraunhofer’s Urban Futures Conference: 2 days in the city of the future

25.11.2015 | Event News

Gluten oder nicht Gluten? Überempfindlichkeit auf Weizen kann unterschiedliche Ursachen haben

17.11.2015 | Event News

Art Collection Deutsche Börse zeigt Ausstellung „Traces of Disorder“

21.10.2015 | Event News

Latest News

Using sphere packing models to explain the structure of forests

26.11.2015 | Ecology, The Environment and Conservation

Dimensionality transition in a newly created material

26.11.2015 | Materials Sciences

Revealing glacier flow with animated satellite images

26.11.2015 | Earth Sciences

More VideoLinks >>>