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Surgery may not be necessary for Achilles tendon rupture

14.05.2009
The two ends of a ruptured Achilles tendon are often stitched together before the leg is put in plaster, in order to reduce the risk of the tendon rupturing again.

However, Katarina Nilsson Helander, MD, PhD at the Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden, now suggests that surgery may be unnecessary. Patients who do not undergo surgery have just as good a chance of recovery.

The Achilles tendon, which attaches the calf muscle to the heel, is the body's strongest tendon. The tendon may rupture on sudden tensing of the muscle, something that affects middle-aged men in particular, typically when playing badminton or tennis.

"When the Achilles tendon ruptures, it feels like a sudden, violent and intensely painful snap in the calf or tendon above the heel. It is an injury that has become increasingly common in recent years, probably because exercise

is increasingly popular. But whether or not one should operate has been the subject of debate for quite some time," says orthopaedic surgeon Katarina Nilsson Helander, MD, PhD.

When the Achilles tendon has ruptured, the foot is put in plaster with the toes pointing downwards, so that the torn ends of the tendon come into contact and join together as they heal. The torn ends of the tendon are often stitched together before the foot is put in plaster, to make sure they stay in place. In recent times, a removable orthosis has begun to replace plaster casts, making it possible for the patient to start to move the foot sooner. Other studies have shown that early motion stimulates healing.

Surgery increases the risk of infections and sores but is often carried out anyway, as studies have shown that the operation reduces the risk of the tendon rupturing again.

One hundred patients were randomly assigned to surgery with early mobilisation or to early mobilisation alone with the removable orthosis and without prior surgery. In every other respect, all the patients in the study had the same treatment. The thesis shows that there is no difference in the re-rupture rate. A year after the injury, there was no difference in the patients' own impression of symptoms and function, but irrespective of which treatment the patient received, the function tests showed that there remained a substantial difference between the healthy and the injured foot.

"I have concluded that not everybody needs to have surgery, but it is important that those who suffer an Achilles tendon rupture discuss the treatment options with their orthopaedic surgeon," says Katarina Nilsson Helander.
Link to thesis: http://gupea.ub.gu.se/dspace/handle/2077/19390
For further information, please contact:
Katarina Nilsson Helander MD, PhD, telephone: +46 (0)300-565000, e-mail: katarina.nilsson-helander@lthalland.se
BY: Elin Lindström Claessen
elin.lindstrom@sahlgrenska.gu.se
+46 31 786 3869
I. The Achilles tendon Total Rupture Score (ATRS): development and validation.
N ilsson-Helander K, Thomeé R, Grävare-Silbernagel K, Thomeé P, Faxén E, Eriksson BI, Karlsson J.

Am J Sports Med. 2007;35:421-426.

II. Acute Achilles Tendon Rupture: A Randomized, Controlled Study Comparing Surgical and
Non-surgical Treatments Using Validated Outcome Measures.
N ilsson-Helander K, Grävare Silbernagel K, Faxén E, Thomeé R, Olsson N, Eriksson BI, Karlsson J.

Manuscript.

III. A new surgical method to treat chronic ruptures and re-ruptures of the Achilles tendon.
N ilsson-Helander K, Swärd L, Grävare Silbernagel K, Thomeé R, Eriksson BI, Karlsson J.

Knee Surg Sports Traumatol Arthrosc. 2008:16:614-620.

IV. A new measurement of heel-rise endurance with the ability to detect functional deficits
in patients with Achilles tendon rupture.
Grävare Silbernagel K, Nilsson-Helander K, Thomeé R, Eriksson BI, Karlsson J.
Manuscript.
V. High incidence of deep venous thrombosis after Achilles tendon rupture
- a prospective study.
N ilsson-Helander K, Thurin A, Karlsson J, Eriksson BI.
Knee Surg Sports Traumatol Arthrosc: 2009 Feb 24 (Epub ahead of print) PMID 19238360.

Helena Aaberg | idw
Further information:
http://www.gu.se/
http://gupea.ub.gu.se/dspace/handle/2077/19390

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