Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:


New software provides free framework for collaborative research in visual field analysis

Vision researchers have developed new software that will analyze visual fields in an open-source platform to improve and encourage collaborative research among independent labs. An analysis of the free tool is presented in a Journal of Vision (JOV) paper, The visualFields package: A tool for analysis and visualization of visual fields.

In the paper, authors introduce and demonstrate the visualFields package, which can work separately or in conjunction with the Open Perimetry Interface — an open-source software developed by Andrew Turpin, PhD, and described in a previous JOV article (The Open Perimetry Interface: An enabling tool for clinical visual psychophysics). The interface allows researchers to operate commercially available instruments called perimeters that are designed to examine the visual field of patients.

"With open-source resources like these, research can be conducted in a completely transparent manner," said author Iván Marín-Franch, PhD, of the University of Valencia (Departamento de Óptica at Universitat de València) and formerly of Indiana University School of Optometry. "And unlike with most proprietary software, results can be verified and methods more closely scrutinized by independent researchers."

The visualFields package contains analytical and visualization tools, including methods for detection and follow-up of glaucoma. To demonstrate the visualFields package, the research team used the right eye of a patient with glaucoma who participated in the Bloomington longitudinal study. Results included four examples of visual field analysis along with the corresponding code used for their generation.

"The necessity for moving from proprietary software into a fully open-source framework has been in the psyche of the glaucoma research community for many years," said Marín-Franch. In looking at the future, he and his colleagues suggest that Open Perimetry Initiative (OPI) would allow groups or individual researchers to test their models with large datasets of real data that they would not have access to otherwise. They also propose centers with good infrastructure would be able conduct clinical trials using state-of-the-art methods for analyzing their data right away and without incurring any cost.

"But, the success of OPI relies strongly on active collaboration from every end of the research community: Some by donating their datasets, some by donating the implementations of their research methods," cautions Marín-Franch.

The researchers make clear that the visualFields package is not intended to replace well-tested, commercially available stand-alone software; rather, it is meant to be an environment for experimentation and research that is free and open for scientists to use and offer ways to improve upon it.

ARVO's Journal of Vision ( is an online-only, peer-reviewed, open-access publication devoted to visual function in humans and animals. It explores topics such as spatial vision, perception, low vision, color vision and more, spanning the fields of neuroscience, psychology and psychophysics. JOV is known for hands-on datasets and models that users can manipulate online.

The Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology (ARVO) is the largest eye and vision research organization in the world. Members include some 12,000 eye and vision researchers from over 70 countries. ARVO encourages and assists research, training, publication and knowledge-sharing in vision and ophthalmology.

Visit us at:

Katrina Norfleet | EurekAlert!
Further information:

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht Inflammation Triggers Unsustainable Immune Response to Chronic Viral Infection
24.10.2016 | Universität Basel

nachricht Resolving the mystery of preeclampsia
21.10.2016 | Universitätsklinikum Magdeburg

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Etching Microstructures with Lasers

Ultrafast lasers have introduced new possibilities in engraving ultrafine structures, and scientists are now also investigating how to use them to etch microstructures into thin glass. There are possible applications in analytics (lab on a chip) and especially in electronics and the consumer sector, where great interest has been shown.

This new method was born of a surprising phenomenon: irradiating glass in a particular way with an ultrafast laser has the effect of making the glass up to a...

Im Focus: Light-driven atomic rotations excite magnetic waves

Terahertz excitation of selected crystal vibrations leads to an effective magnetic field that drives coherent spin motion

Controlling functional properties by light is one of the grand goals in modern condensed matter physics and materials science. A new study now demonstrates how...

Im Focus: New 3-D wiring technique brings scalable quantum computers closer to reality

Researchers from the Institute for Quantum Computing (IQC) at the University of Waterloo led the development of a new extensible wiring technique capable of controlling superconducting quantum bits, representing a significant step towards to the realization of a scalable quantum computer.

"The quantum socket is a wiring method that uses three-dimensional wires based on spring-loaded pins to address individual qubits," said Jeremy Béjanin, a PhD...

Im Focus: Scientists develop a semiconductor nanocomposite material that moves in response to light

In a paper in Scientific Reports, a research team at Worcester Polytechnic Institute describes a novel light-activated phenomenon that could become the basis for applications as diverse as microscopic robotic grippers and more efficient solar cells.

A research team at Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI) has developed a revolutionary, light-activated semiconductor nanocomposite material that can be used...

Im Focus: Diamonds aren't forever: Sandia, Harvard team create first quantum computer bridge

By forcefully embedding two silicon atoms in a diamond matrix, Sandia researchers have demonstrated for the first time on a single chip all the components needed to create a quantum bridge to link quantum computers together.

"People have already built small quantum computers," says Sandia researcher Ryan Camacho. "Maybe the first useful one won't be a single giant quantum computer...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>



Event News

#IC2S2: When Social Science meets Computer Science - GESIS will host the IC2S2 conference 2017

14.10.2016 | Event News

Agricultural Trade Developments and Potentials in Central Asia and the South Caucasus

14.10.2016 | Event News

World Health Summit – Day Three: A Call to Action

12.10.2016 | Event News

Latest News

Ice shelf vibrations cause unusual waves in Antarctic atmosphere

25.10.2016 | Earth Sciences

Fluorescent holography: Upending the world of biological imaging

25.10.2016 | Power and Electrical Engineering

Etching Microstructures with Lasers

25.10.2016 | Process Engineering

More VideoLinks >>>