Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Cancer control in Europe works; now it is time to extend it to poorer countries

25.09.2007
Only a few years ago cancer was considered to be a disease of westernised, developed countries, but now the burden is increasingly falling on less developed countries, a leading epidemiologist told ECCO 14, the European Cancer Conference, today (Monday 24 September).

Professor Peter Boyle, Director of the International Agency for Research on Cancer, Lyon, France, said that a major challenge for low-to-medium resource countries would be to find sufficient resources to treat the large numbers of cancers that would be diagnosed in their populations in the coming years.

In the year 2000, estimates suggest that there were 10.4 million new cases of cancer diagnosed worldwide, 6.5 million deaths from cancer, and over 25 million people living with cancer. Taking account of the growth and ageing of the world’s population, and factoring in an annual increase in cancer incidence and mortality of one percent, in 2030 there may be 27 million new cases diagnosed, 17 million cancer deaths, and 75 million people alive with cancer.

“If we put population growth and ageing to one side,” said Professor Boyle, “the exportation of cancer risk factors, primarily tobacco smoking, from developed countries will continue to be a major determinant of cancer risk and cancer burden in less developed countries.”

Low-to-medium resource countries will be harder hit by cancer than high-resource countries, says Professor Boyle. This is because such countries often have a limited health budget and a high background level of communicable disease. Cancer treatments are not universally available and life-extending treatments, for economic reasons, are available only to a few, if at all.

But something can be done. In Europe, although the number of cancer cases continues to rise, there are starting to be fewer deaths than expected, said Professor Boyle, and this showed that cancer control policies were working. “We have moved from the theoretical to the practical in cancer control,” he said.

In 2006 in Europe there were an estimated 3,191,600 cancer cases diagnosed (excluding non-melanoma skin cancers) and 1,713,000 deaths from cancer. The total number of new cases of cancer in Europe increased by 300,000 between 2004 and 2006. With an estimated 3.3 million new cases (53% occurring in men and 47% in women) and 1.7 million deaths (56% in men and 44% in women) each year, cancer remains an important public health problem in Europe, said Professor Boyle, and the ageing of the population will mean that these numbers will continue to increase even if age-specific rates remain constant.

The Europe against Cancer programme was established in 1985 to try to tackle increasing cancer incidence and mortality. The first stage of the programme had, as its objective, the reduction of the number of deaths expected to be caused by cancer by 15% by the year 2000. This goal was to be achieved by a partnership approach and a programme of activities in primary prevention (particularly tobacco control), screening, and education and training.

“This approach has clearly paid off,” said Professor Boyle. “In the EU in 2000, we expected to see 1,033,083 deaths from cancer on the basis of age-specific rates for the mid 1980s. In fact, we now know that there were 935,219 cancer deaths in the EU in 2000 – 97,684 fewer than expected, or a reduction of 9.5%.

“Cancer and other chronic diseases, which are becoming more common throughout the world, can cause devastating damage to entire families,” he said. “If cancer is not given higher priority through focused global efforts, healthcare systems in low-income and middle-income countries will encounter even further problems as the number of cancer cases increases. More and more people will die prematurely and needlessly from cancer, with devastating social and economic consequences for households, communities, and countries alike. Cancer could become a major impediment to socio-economic development in low income and economically emerging nations.”

“We have clear evidence that cancer can be controlled. The time is right for this to happen in lower-income countries too. The WHO Resolution on Cancer Prevention and Control provides a strong impetus for countries to develop programmes aimed at the reduction of cancer incidence and mortality and to determine strategic priorities to achieve progress. Such priorities must be realistic and achievable. Depending on priorities and competing health priorities, all steps must be taken to avoid those cancers which are avoidable, to treat those which are treatable, to cure those which are curable, and to provide palliation to patients who need palliative care,” he said.

Mary Rice | alfa
Further information:
http://www.ecco-org.eu

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht Cholesterol-lowering drugs may fight infectious disease
22.08.2017 | Duke University

nachricht Once invincible superbug squashed by 'superteam' of antibiotics
22.08.2017 | University at Buffalo

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Fizzy soda water could be key to clean manufacture of flat wonder material: Graphene

Whether you call it effervescent, fizzy, or sparkling, carbonated water is making a comeback as a beverage. Aside from quenching thirst, researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have discovered a new use for these "bubbly" concoctions that will have major impact on the manufacturer of the world's thinnest, flattest, and one most useful materials -- graphene.

As graphene's popularity grows as an advanced "wonder" material, the speed and quality at which it can be manufactured will be paramount. With that in mind,...

Im Focus: Exotic quantum states made from light: Physicists create optical “wells” for a super-photon

Physicists at the University of Bonn have managed to create optical hollows and more complex patterns into which the light of a Bose-Einstein condensate flows. The creation of such highly low-loss structures for light is a prerequisite for complex light circuits, such as for quantum information processing for a new generation of computers. The researchers are now presenting their results in the journal Nature Photonics.

Light particles (photons) occur as tiny, indivisible portions. Many thousands of these light portions can be merged to form a single super-photon if they are...

Im Focus: Circular RNA linked to brain function

For the first time, scientists have shown that circular RNA is linked to brain function. When a RNA molecule called Cdr1as was deleted from the genome of mice, the animals had problems filtering out unnecessary information – like patients suffering from neuropsychiatric disorders.

While hundreds of circular RNAs (circRNAs) are abundant in mammalian brains, one big question has remained unanswered: What are they actually good for? In the...

Im Focus: RAVAN CubeSat measures Earth's outgoing energy

An experimental small satellite has successfully collected and delivered data on a key measurement for predicting changes in Earth's climate.

The Radiometer Assessment using Vertically Aligned Nanotubes (RAVAN) CubeSat was launched into low-Earth orbit on Nov. 11, 2016, in order to test new...

Im Focus: Scientists shine new light on the “other high temperature superconductor”

A study led by scientists of the Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter (MPSD) at the Center for Free-Electron Laser Science in Hamburg presents evidence of the coexistence of superconductivity and “charge-density-waves” in compounds of the poorly-studied family of bismuthates. This observation opens up new perspectives for a deeper understanding of the phenomenon of high-temperature superconductivity, a topic which is at the core of condensed matter research since more than 30 years. The paper by Nicoletti et al has been published in the PNAS.

Since the beginning of the 20th century, superconductivity had been observed in some metals at temperatures only a few degrees above the absolute zero (minus...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Call for Papers – ICNFT 2018, 5th International Conference on New Forming Technology

16.08.2017 | Event News

Sustainability is the business model of tomorrow

04.08.2017 | Event News

Clash of Realities 2017: Registration now open. International Conference at TH Köln

26.07.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Scientists discover species of dolphin that existed along South Carolina coast

24.08.2017 | Life Sciences

The science of fluoride flipping

24.08.2017 | Life Sciences

Optimizing therapy planning for cancers of the liver

24.08.2017 | Medical Engineering

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>