Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

'Diabetes gene' may be linked to polycystic ovary syndrome

08.12.2006
Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) occurs when ovarian cysts block a woman's normal ovulation and menstrual cycle. While the problem sounds straightforward, the disease is complex, born from both multiple genetic components and environmental factors.

PCOS affects up to five percent of the female population, and those diagnosed with the disease have a 2- to 7-fold risk of developing type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). For this reason researchers believe a gene related to diabetes may also play a role in the onset of PCOS. A new study of 146 PCOS patients has found that the "diabetes gene" (calpain-10 (CAPN10)) is in fact an interesting candidate for explaining the syndrome.

A New Study

The findings are contained in a new study entitled "Calpain-10 Variants and Haplotypes are Associated with Polycystic Ovary Syndrome in Caucasians." The study was conducted by Caren Vollmert, Claudia Lamina, Cornelia Huth, Melanie Kolz, Andreas Schopfer-Wendels, Friedhelm Bongardt, Florian Kronenberg, Hannelore Lowel and Thomas Illig, all of the GSF-National Research Center for Environment and Health, Neuherberg; Susanne Hahn, Klaus Mann and Onno E. Janssen, University of Duisburg-Essen, Essen; H.-Erich Wichmann, Ludwig Maximilians University, Munich; Jakob C. Mueller, Technical University, Munich; Christian Herder, Heinrich Heine University, Dusseldorf; and Rolf Holle, GSF-National Research Center of Environment and Health, Neuherberg, Germany.

Their study appears in the online edition of the American Journal of Physiology-Endocrinology and Metabolism (http://ajpendo.physiology.org). The journal is one of the 14 scientific publications published by the American Physiological Society (APS) (www.The-APS.org) each month.

Methodology

The study comprised 752 females. Of the total, 146 were diagnosed with PCOS and 606 were unrelated non-diabetic female controls drawn from a previously conducted independent study of the German population.

Genomic DNA was taken from the PCOS group and isolated from whole blood, and genomic DNA was extracted from the blood leukocytes of the controls. Eight CAPN10 variants were genotyped: UCSNP-44, -43, -56, ins/del-19 (a fragment of gene CAPN10 UCSNP-19, which contains an insertion or deletion variation in the DNA sequence), -110, -58, -63, and -22.

The researchers extracted these eight specific single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) ¡V the small genetic variations that can occur within a person's DNA sequence because they are known to be associated with PCOS, type 2 diabetes, or related traits. Genotyping using comparative DNA analysis to determine the predisposition of individuals to certain diseases was then performed.

To estimate the genetic association of each of the eight SNPs with PCOS the differences in genotype distributions between the case and control groups were measured. The impact of the differences in age and body mass index (BMI) structures for both groups was also calculated. To better clarify the purported associations between CAPN10 and PCOS the researchers performed a meta-analysis using their own data and all available published data showing a genetic association between CAPN10 and PCOS.

Results

Highlights of the researchers' findings include the following:

- clear evidence associating the diabetes gene areas CAPN10 UCSNP-56 and UCSNP-ins/del-19 with PCOS susceptibility

- an expected association between CAPN10 UCSNP-22 and PCOS

- no significant association between CAPN10 UCSNP-44, -43, -110, -58, or -63 and PCOS susceptibility

Conclusions

This study provides additional strong support for the theory that two areas of one gene -- CAPN10 UCSNP-56 and UCSNP-ins/del-19 -- are related to PCOS susceptibility. These data also suggest that the SNP ins/del-19 may be related to both PCOS and type 2 diabetes.

The findings are good news for the estimated five percent of the female population who are diagnosed with the painful and sometimes disabling disease. At the same time, the authors recommend that additional case-control studies and meta-analysis be undertaken to better understand these findings.

Donna Krupa | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.the-aps.org

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht Team discovers how bacteria exploit a chink in the body's armor
20.01.2017 | University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

nachricht Rabies viruses reveal wiring in transparent brains
19.01.2017 | Rheinische Friedrich-Wilhelms-Universität Bonn

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Traffic jam in empty space

New success for Konstanz physicists in studying the quantum vacuum

An important step towards a completely new experimental access to quantum physics has been made at University of Konstanz. The team of scientists headed by...

Im Focus: How gut bacteria can make us ill

HZI researchers decipher infection mechanisms of Yersinia and immune responses of the host

Yersiniae cause severe intestinal infections. Studies using Yersinia pseudotuberculosis as a model organism aim to elucidate the infection mechanisms of these...

Im Focus: Interfacial Superconductivity: Magnetic and superconducting order revealed simultaneously

Researchers from the University of Hamburg in Germany, in collaboration with colleagues from the University of Aarhus in Denmark, have synthesized a new superconducting material by growing a few layers of an antiferromagnetic transition-metal chalcogenide on a bismuth-based topological insulator, both being non-superconducting materials.

While superconductivity and magnetism are generally believed to be mutually exclusive, surprisingly, in this new material, superconducting correlations...

Im Focus: Studying fundamental particles in materials

Laser-driving of semimetals allows creating novel quasiparticle states within condensed matter systems and switching between different states on ultrafast time scales

Studying properties of fundamental particles in condensed matter systems is a promising approach to quantum field theory. Quasiparticles offer the opportunity...

Im Focus: Designing Architecture with Solar Building Envelopes

Among the general public, solar thermal energy is currently associated with dark blue, rectangular collectors on building roofs. Technologies are needed for aesthetically high quality architecture which offer the architect more room for manoeuvre when it comes to low- and plus-energy buildings. With the “ArKol” project, researchers at Fraunhofer ISE together with partners are currently developing two façade collectors for solar thermal energy generation, which permit a high degree of design flexibility: a strip collector for opaque façade sections and a solar thermal blind for transparent sections. The current state of the two developments will be presented at the BAU 2017 trade fair.

As part of the “ArKol – development of architecturally highly integrated façade collectors with heat pipes” project, Fraunhofer ISE together with its partners...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Sustainable Water use in Agriculture in Eastern Europe and Central Asia

19.01.2017 | Event News

12V, 48V, high-voltage – trends in E/E automotive architecture

10.01.2017 | Event News

2nd Conference on Non-Textual Information on 10 and 11 May 2017 in Hannover

09.01.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Helmholtz International Fellow Award for Sarah Amalia Teichmann

20.01.2017 | Awards Funding

An innovative high-performance material: biofibers made from green lacewing silk

20.01.2017 | Materials Sciences

Ion treatments for cardiac arrhythmia — Non-invasive alternative to catheter-based surgery

20.01.2017 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>