Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Pine tree bark reduces diabetic leg ulcers

07.09.2006
November -- National diabetes month

Untreated diabetic leg ulcers may result in amputations.

According to the Center of Disease Control, one out of six diabetics will require an amputation (below the knee) during their lifetime.

A study published in the July journal of Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis shows that Pycnogenol® (pic-noj-en-all), an antioxidant plant extract from the bark of the French maritime pine tree, heals leg ulcers in patients who suffer from diabetic leg ulcerations. The most significant findings were patients treated with oral and local Pycnogenol® resulting in a 74.4 percent decrease in ulcer size within six weeks.

According to Dr. Gianni Belcaro, a lead researcher of the study, the majority of diabetic leg amputations common to the lower leg and feet, begin with the formation of skin ulcers. Impaired blood circulation in diabetics may cause tissue necrotization and discoloration which leads to development of ulcers. The open ulcer is prone to infection and difficult to heal.

The study sampled thirty diabetic patients at the Chieti-Pescara University in Italy, who suffer from severe microangiopathy causing leg ulcerations. Patients were randomly assigned to four groups. Treatment was provided daily for six weeks.

After six weeks of treatment results showed the most significant ulcer healing for patients who supplemented with combined oral and local treatment. Group 1 patients supplemented with oral and local Pycnogenol® experienced a 74.4 percent decrease in leg ulcer size. Group 2 patients supplemented with local Pycnogenol® experienced a 41.3 percent decrease in leg ulcer size. Group 3 patients supplemented with oral Pycnogenol® experienced a 33 percent decrease in leg ulcer size. Group 4, the control group, experienced a 22 percent decrease, from disinfecting the ulcers on a daily basis. Eighty-nine percent of the patients treated with oral and local Pycnogenol® were completely healed.

Group 1 participants received 150 mg Pycnogenol® as oral treatment and 100 mg from capsules as powder placed on the ulcerated area (local); Group 2 participants received oral treatment Pycnogenol® with 150 mg; Group 3 received 100 mg of local treatment and Group 4 received no medical care, other then the same ulcer care as the other subjects (washed and cleaned with warm water and local disinfectant).

Ulcers were washed and medicated every day for six weeks. The area of the ulceration was copied on a transparent plastic sheet and the relative integral was recorded in a computerized system. A microcirculatory evaluation was performed at inclusion of the study and repeated after six weeks.

Direct questioning was used to evaluate tolerability and compliance, particularly gastrointestinal problems, systematic and local skin alterations, signs of allergic reaction and any other manifestation. No side effects were reported.

Over 35 years of research on Pycnogenol® demonstrate the antioxidant's ability to improve blood flow, encouraging improved circulation. "The Pycnogenol®-treated groups all showed a significantly increased oxygen presence in the skin and a significantly lowered carbon dioxide level. These findings suggest that Pycnogenol® helps to resolve the underlying microangiopathy with an improved blood micro-circulation carrying more oxygen to the feet," said Dr. Belcaro. "Better circulation decreases the chance of developing ulcers."

Previous research shows Pycnogenol® may be helpful in controlling an array of problems prevailing in diabetics. Clinical studies which sampled more than 1,200 patients demonstrated Pycnogenol® treatment to be highly effective for prevention of diabetic retinopathy--bleeding capillaries in the eye that causes irreversible vision loss. Other studies show Pycnogenol to be effective in lowering glucose levels and increasing the health of blood vessels in patients with type II diabetes, after supplementation of 50–200 mg Pycnogenol.

"If left untreated, damage to blood vessels from diabetes then manifests in typical circulatory problems such as hypertension, from which 50 percent of type II diabetics suffer. Solid evidence shows that Pycnogenol® effectively reduces high blood pressure, platelet aggregation, LDL cholesterol and enhances circulation," said Belcaro.

Melanie Nimrodi | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.mww.com

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht Investigators may unlock mystery of how staph cells dodge the body's immune system
22.09.2017 | Cedars-Sinai Medical Center

nachricht Monitoring the heart's mitochondria to predict cardiac arrest?
21.09.2017 | Boston Children's Hospital

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: The pyrenoid is a carbon-fixing liquid droplet

Plants and algae use the enzyme Rubisco to fix carbon dioxide, removing it from the atmosphere and converting it into biomass. Algae have figured out a way to increase the efficiency of carbon fixation. They gather most of their Rubisco into a ball-shaped microcompartment called the pyrenoid, which they flood with a high local concentration of carbon dioxide. A team of scientists at Princeton University, the Carnegie Institution for Science, Stanford University and the Max Plank Institute of Biochemistry have unravelled the mysteries of how the pyrenoid is assembled. These insights can help to engineer crops that remove more carbon dioxide from the atmosphere while producing more food.

A warming planet

Im Focus: Highly precise wiring in the Cerebral Cortex

Our brains house extremely complex neuronal circuits, whose detailed structures are still largely unknown. This is especially true for the so-called cerebral cortex of mammals, where among other things vision, thoughts or spatial orientation are being computed. Here the rules by which nerve cells are connected to each other are only partly understood. A team of scientists around Moritz Helmstaedter at the Frankfiurt Max Planck Institute for Brain Research and Helene Schmidt (Humboldt University in Berlin) have now discovered a surprisingly precise nerve cell connectivity pattern in the part of the cerebral cortex that is responsible for orienting the individual animal or human in space.

The researchers report online in Nature (Schmidt et al., 2017. Axonal synapse sorting in medial entorhinal cortex, DOI: 10.1038/nature24005) that synapses in...

Im Focus: Tiny lasers from a gallery of whispers

New technique promises tunable laser devices

Whispering gallery mode (WGM) resonators are used to make tiny micro-lasers, sensors, switches, routers and other devices. These tiny structures rely on a...

Im Focus: Ultrafast snapshots of relaxing electrons in solids

Using ultrafast flashes of laser and x-ray radiation, scientists at the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics (Garching, Germany) took snapshots of the briefest electron motion inside a solid material to date. The electron motion lasted only 750 billionths of the billionth of a second before it fainted, setting a new record of human capability to capture ultrafast processes inside solids!

When x-rays shine onto solid materials or large molecules, an electron is pushed away from its original place near the nucleus of the atom, leaving a hole...

Im Focus: Quantum Sensors Decipher Magnetic Ordering in a New Semiconducting Material

For the first time, physicists have successfully imaged spiral magnetic ordering in a multiferroic material. These materials are considered highly promising candidates for future data storage media. The researchers were able to prove their findings using unique quantum sensors that were developed at Basel University and that can analyze electromagnetic fields on the nanometer scale. The results – obtained by scientists from the University of Basel’s Department of Physics, the Swiss Nanoscience Institute, the University of Montpellier and several laboratories from University Paris-Saclay – were recently published in the journal Nature.

Multiferroics are materials that simultaneously react to electric and magnetic fields. These two properties are rarely found together, and their combined...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

“Lasers in Composites Symposium” in Aachen – from Science to Application

19.09.2017 | Event News

I-ESA 2018 – Call for Papers

12.09.2017 | Event News

EMBO at Basel Life, a new conference on current and emerging life science research

06.09.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Rainbow colors reveal cell history: Uncovering β-cell heterogeneity

22.09.2017 | Life Sciences

Penn first in world to treat patient with new radiation technology

22.09.2017 | Medical Engineering

Calculating quietness

22.09.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>