Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Major findings on fetal research to be unveiled at University of Leicester

27.06.2006
Pioneering research into how fetal growth affected by adverse events in the uterus influences the development of illnesses in adult life, including major findings on changes which occur in fetuses, are to be presented at the University of Leicester.

Professor Justin Konje, Professor of Obstetrics and Gynaecology at the University of Leicester, will discuss the fetal origins of adult diseases in his inaugural lecture on Tuesday 27th June at 5.30pm, Ken Edwards Lecture Theatre 1, University of Leicester.

He said: "One quarter of adults in the UK suffer from new heart attacks every year, a third of the population have high blood pressure and over 2.6M people living in the UK have had a disease of the circulatory system. In addition, another 1.9M adults in the UK suffer from diabetes mellitus. Last year, approximately 2285 patients went on the list for kidney transplant. These and many other long-term illnesses are thought to be linked to intrauterine life. While there is enough evidence from the UK and different parts of the world to support this hypothesis of intrauterine origins of adult diseases, several questions remain unanswered about the precise mechanisms by which these occur and how some babies (the small ones) are prone to these diseases.

"This inaugural lecture will focus on the research which has been undertaken at the University of Leicester to unravel some of the complexities of this hypothesis, including major findings on the changes which occur in the fetuses (babies in the womb) such as the “Sausage-shaped” kidneys, altered blood distribution (prior to fetal death) that may explain the mechanisms by which these babies are at an increased risk."

Additionally, work which has been undertaken to improve a better understanding of fetal growth, how it is identified and monitored especially the first ever use of 3-D ultrasound scan to assess placental function and blood flow will be presented. The role of factors such as xenobiotics, which control fetal growth, will also be discussed.

Professor Konje, who is based at the Leicester Royal Infirmary, added: "I will share my views on the future of research in this health priority area and the direction in which my research in this area within the University of Leicester may lead to.

"Research into the fetal origins of adult diseases, should help provide potential options on how to minimise fetal growth restriction, precise and early identification, the long-term implications of the different types and more importantly how to devise strategies to reduce the incidence of adult diseases which put together are the most commonly reported causes of long-term ill health."

Alex Jelley | alfa
Further information:
http://www.le.ac.uk

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht Minimising risks of transplants
22.02.2018 | Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg

nachricht FAU researchers demonstrate that an oxygen sensor in the body reduces inflammation
22.02.2018 | Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Developing reliable quantum computers

International research team makes important step on the path to solving certification problems

Quantum computers may one day solve algorithmic problems which even the biggest supercomputers today can’t manage. But how do you test a quantum computer to...

Im Focus: In best circles: First integrated circuit from self-assembled polymer

For the first time, a team of researchers at the Max-Planck Institute (MPI) for Polymer Research in Mainz, Germany, has succeeded in making an integrated circuit (IC) from just a monolayer of a semiconducting polymer via a bottom-up, self-assembly approach.

In the self-assembly process, the semiconducting polymer arranges itself into an ordered monolayer in a transistor. The transistors are binary switches used...

Im Focus: Demonstration of a single molecule piezoelectric effect

Breakthrough provides a new concept of the design of molecular motors, sensors and electricity generators at nanoscale

Researchers from the Institute of Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry of the CAS (IOCB Prague), Institute of Physics of the CAS (IP CAS) and Palacký University...

Im Focus: Hybrid optics bring color imaging using ultrathin metalenses into focus

For photographers and scientists, lenses are lifesavers. They reflect and refract light, making possible the imaging systems that drive discovery through the microscope and preserve history through cameras.

But today's glass-based lenses are bulky and resist miniaturization. Next-generation technologies, such as ultrathin cameras or tiny microscopes, require...

Im Focus: Stem cell divisions in the adult brain seen for the first time

Scientists from the University of Zurich have succeeded for the first time in tracking individual stem cells and their neuronal progeny over months within the intact adult brain. This study sheds light on how new neurons are produced throughout life.

The generation of new nerve cells was once thought to taper off at the end of embryonic development. However, recent research has shown that the adult brain...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

2nd International Conference on High Temperature Shape Memory Alloys (HTSMAs)

15.02.2018 | Event News

Aachen DC Grid Summit 2018

13.02.2018 | Event News

How Global Climate Policy Can Learn from the Energy Transition

12.02.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Decoding the structure of the huntingtin protein

22.02.2018 | Life Sciences

Camera technology in vehicles: Low-latency image data compression

22.02.2018 | Information Technology

Minimising risks of transplants

22.02.2018 | Health and Medicine

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>