Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:


Nuclear imaging offers possibility for early detection of patients with coronary heart disease


Nuclear imaging will play an increasing role in both the detection of atherosclerosis (coronary heart disease) and, more specifically, the composition of plaque build up that can block the flow of blood through an artery, according to journal reports published by the Society of Nuclear Medicine.

A trio of articles, "Evaluation of 18F-FDG Uptake and Arterial Wall Calcifications Using 18F-FDG PET/CT," "Molecular and Metabolic Imaging of Atherosclerosis" and "Noninvasive Imaging of Atherosclerosis: The Biology Behind the Pictures," appears in the November 2004 issue of "The Journal of Nuclear Medicine."

Heart disease, in the news recently because of former President Bill Clinton’s quadruple coronary artery bypass surgery, is one of the leading causes of death worldwide. According to SNM members Simona Ben-Haim, M.D., and Ora Israel, M.D., "combined positron emission tomography and computed tomography may be helpful in the detection of early abnormalities in the arterial wall." They said, "These abnormalities may be the cause of future severe cardiovascular events … the PET/CT scan may be potentially useful in early detection of disease, prevention, monitoring response to therapy and prognosis." This preliminary study, which took more than three years, could establish a role for nuclear medicine as a noninvasive imaging tool for atherosclerosis, providing both functional and anatomical information. The results of the study, one of the first of its kind, are detailed in "Evaluation of 18F-FDG Uptake and Arterial Wall Calcifications Using 18F-FDG PET/CT." While the results are exciting, the two authors said that more research is needed "to confirm our results and lead to the understanding of their clinical significance."

While Clinton’s angiogram showed he had blockage in some coronary arteries caused by fatty plaque accumulated over the years, the authors of "Molecular and Metabolic Imaging of Atherosclerosis" pointed out that, "recent advances in understanding of the pathobiology of atherosclerosis have highlighted the inadequacies" of imaging the disease with X-ray angiography. John R. Davies, B.Sc.; James H. Rudd, Ph.D.; and Peter L. Weissberg, M.D., stated the need for better imaging approaches and outlined the biology of atherosclerosis, reviewing both invasive and noninvasive (such as 18F-FDG PET) imaging techniques available, especially those that detect metabolic or inflammatory changes within detected plaque. Advances in understanding cell biology show a need for imaging techniques that can provide information about plaque composition and drive the development of more informative imaging techniques, they say. "Nuclear imaging has the potential to provide invaluable information on the cellular, metabolic and molecular composition of the plaque," note the authors.

In the journal’s invited perspective, "Noninvasive Imaging of Atherosclerosis: The Biology Behind the Pictures," Weissberg writes, "It has taken the best part of 50 years for us to learn that angiography tells us very little about atherosclerotic plaques." He added, "It is crucial that we learn more quickly what newer imaging techniques are telling us."

Maryann Verrillo | EurekAlert!
Further information:

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht Advanced analysis of brain structure shape may track progression to Alzheimer's disease
26.10.2016 | Massachusetts General Hospital

nachricht Indian roadside refuse fires produce toxic rainbow
26.10.2016 | Duke University

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Etching Microstructures with Lasers

Ultrafast lasers have introduced new possibilities in engraving ultrafine structures, and scientists are now also investigating how to use them to etch microstructures into thin glass. There are possible applications in analytics (lab on a chip) and especially in electronics and the consumer sector, where great interest has been shown.

This new method was born of a surprising phenomenon: irradiating glass in a particular way with an ultrafast laser has the effect of making the glass up to a...

Im Focus: Light-driven atomic rotations excite magnetic waves

Terahertz excitation of selected crystal vibrations leads to an effective magnetic field that drives coherent spin motion

Controlling functional properties by light is one of the grand goals in modern condensed matter physics and materials science. A new study now demonstrates how...

Im Focus: New 3-D wiring technique brings scalable quantum computers closer to reality

Researchers from the Institute for Quantum Computing (IQC) at the University of Waterloo led the development of a new extensible wiring technique capable of controlling superconducting quantum bits, representing a significant step towards to the realization of a scalable quantum computer.

"The quantum socket is a wiring method that uses three-dimensional wires based on spring-loaded pins to address individual qubits," said Jeremy Béjanin, a PhD...

Im Focus: Scientists develop a semiconductor nanocomposite material that moves in response to light

In a paper in Scientific Reports, a research team at Worcester Polytechnic Institute describes a novel light-activated phenomenon that could become the basis for applications as diverse as microscopic robotic grippers and more efficient solar cells.

A research team at Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI) has developed a revolutionary, light-activated semiconductor nanocomposite material that can be used...

Im Focus: Diamonds aren't forever: Sandia, Harvard team create first quantum computer bridge

By forcefully embedding two silicon atoms in a diamond matrix, Sandia researchers have demonstrated for the first time on a single chip all the components needed to create a quantum bridge to link quantum computers together.

"People have already built small quantum computers," says Sandia researcher Ryan Camacho. "Maybe the first useful one won't be a single giant quantum computer...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>



Event News

#IC2S2: When Social Science meets Computer Science - GESIS will host the IC2S2 conference 2017

14.10.2016 | Event News

Agricultural Trade Developments and Potentials in Central Asia and the South Caucasus

14.10.2016 | Event News

World Health Summit – Day Three: A Call to Action

12.10.2016 | Event News

Latest News

Greater Range and Longer Lifetime

26.10.2016 | Power and Electrical Engineering

VDI presents International Bionic Award of the Schauenburg Foundation

26.10.2016 | Awards Funding

3-D-printed magnets

26.10.2016 | Power and Electrical Engineering

More VideoLinks >>>