Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Red wine mist? Resveratrol shows potential effects against COPD, asthma, arthritis

28.10.2004


Natural product inhibited anti-inflammatory mediator release from human airway epithelial cells

Homing in on mechanisms for the reported effectiveness of resveratrol, which is found in red wine, researchers at Imperial College London, England, confirmed its broad anti-inflammatory action, and found potential for applications in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), asthma, and possibly even arthritis. Clinical preparation and delivery remain issues, though an aerosol version would have obvious benefits.

Indeed, lead researcher Louise Donnelly said "Resveratrol exhibited anti-inflammatory activity in all the systems we examined: laboratory cells lines as well as ’real’ human airway epithelial cells," or HAEC. The research paper published by Donnelly et al. in the American Journal of Physiology-Lung Cellular and Molecular Physiology, notes: "Our study is novel as it examines the anti-inflammatory mechanism(s) of resveratrol in cells relevant to human disease and explores all of the proposed mechanisms in a single study."



Most importantly, resveratrol "inhibited anti-inflammatory mediator release from human airway epithelial cells." And contrary to earlier conjecture, the Imperial College researchers showed that "resveratrol did not act as an estrogen or glucocorticosteroid," each of which have patient acceptance issues.

Resveratrol from red wine has long been associated with the so-called "French Paradox," reflecting the low incidence of heart disease among the French despite their relatively high-fat diet. It is a polyphenolic compound found in the skins of such red fruits as grapes and plums, the red skin of peanuts, and even peanut butter. However, Donnelly noted there’s "no evidence that COPD, asthma (especially in asthmatic smokers) or related diseases have lower incidence in France or elsewhere in the Mediterranean region."

OTC versions not useful: aerosol version needed

Moreover, Donnelly warned that their research group had "looked at the over-the-counter" versions of resveratrol and found that "it’s not very pure and probably wouldn’t be worth taking." The major problem is bioavailability. The compound dissolves only in certain solvents, including alcohol, "and is cleared very rapidly in the liver," Donnelly said.

Especially for such respiratory diseases as COPD and asthma, developing an aerosol version for inhalation probably would be a better option," Donnelly said, noting that it would overcome one of the problems with steroids, which is noncompliance.

The current research aimed to confirm and quantify the effect of resveratrol and quercetin, a related plant-derived polyphenolic compound that often mimics its diverse activities, and to further study the molecular mechanisms involved.

While resveratrol "exhibited anti-inflammatory activity in all the systems we examined," the researchers said, "it appeared to be more effective, although less potent, than glucocorticoids. Resveratrol also inhibited inflammatory mediator release from human airway epithelial cells (HAEC), inhibited iNOS and COX-2 (cyclooxygenase) gene transcription, together with IL-8 and GM-CSF expression in HAEC. The inhibition of iNOS (inducible nitric oxide synthase) expression and activity in primary HAEC is significant, because steroids are ineffective in this system," the paper states.

IL-8 (interleukin-8) and GM-CSF (granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor) are important in the inflammation development, they noted, because IL-8 plays a major role in the recruitment of inflammatory leukocytes, particularly neutrophils, and GM-CSF is a cell survivor factor, thus prolonging the resident time of inflammatory cells. "The differential inhibitory effects of resveratrol on IL-8 and GM-CSF release (shown in this study) further suggest that resveratrol is not simply acting as a general inhibitor of inflammatory mediator release but exhibits some selectivity."

Next steps: further narrow mechanisms of broad anti-inflammatory

Donnelly et al. conclude that resveratrol and quercetin "can act as novel anti-inflammatory agents. Their mechanism of action is not via the estrogen or glucocorticoid receptor; thus these agents might be beneficial in inflammatory diseases where glucocorticosteroids have proved to be ineffective, such as COPD, steroid-resistant asthma, and arthritis. These compounds may provide candidate molecules for the development of novel anti-inflammatory therapies."

The current study "excluded a lot" of potential mechanisms of action, Donnelly said, but we "still don’t know what its target receptor is as it binds like a protein, but acts like an estrogen," which it’s not. "The good thing is that it does stop inflammation" across a broad range of systems, she added.

Source and funding: The article, "Anti-inflammatory effects of resveratrol in lung epithelial cells: molecular mechanisms," appears in the October issue of American Journal of Physiology-Lung Cellular and Molecular Physiology, published by the American Physiological Society.

In addition to Donnelly, other members of the research team, all from the Department of Thoracic Medicine, National Heart & Lung Institute, Imperial College London, England, are: Robert Newton, Gina E. Kennedy, Peter S. Fenwick, Rachel H.F. Leung, Kazuhiro Ito, Richard E.K. Russell and Peter J. Barnes.

Research was funded by grants from Pharmascience Inc., Pharmacia (part of Pfizer Inc.), the British Lung Foundation and the National Asthma Campaign (UK).

Mayer Resnick | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.the-aps.org

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht One gene closer to regenerative therapy for muscular disorders
01.06.2017 | Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center

nachricht The gut microbiota plays a key role in treatment with classic diabetes medication
01.06.2017 | University of Gothenburg

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Can we see monkeys from space? Emerging technologies to map biodiversity

An international team of scientists has proposed a new multi-disciplinary approach in which an array of new technologies will allow us to map biodiversity and the risks that wildlife is facing at the scale of whole landscapes. The findings are published in Nature Ecology and Evolution. This international research is led by the Kunming Institute of Zoology from China, University of East Anglia, University of Leicester and the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research.

Using a combination of satellite and ground data, the team proposes that it is now possible to map biodiversity with an accuracy that has not been previously...

Im Focus: Climate satellite: Tracking methane with robust laser technology

Heatwaves in the Arctic, longer periods of vegetation in Europe, severe floods in West Africa – starting in 2021, scientists want to explore the emissions of the greenhouse gas methane with the German-French satellite MERLIN. This is made possible by a new robust laser system of the Fraunhofer Institute for Laser Technology ILT in Aachen, which achieves unprecedented measurement accuracy.

Methane is primarily the result of the decomposition of organic matter. The gas has a 25 times greater warming potential than carbon dioxide, but is not as...

Im Focus: How protons move through a fuel cell

Hydrogen is regarded as the energy source of the future: It is produced with solar power and can be used to generate heat and electricity in fuel cells. Empa researchers have now succeeded in decoding the movement of hydrogen ions in crystals – a key step towards more efficient energy conversion in the hydrogen industry of tomorrow.

As charge carriers, electrons and ions play the leading role in electrochemical energy storage devices and converters such as batteries and fuel cells. Proton...

Im Focus: A unique data centre for cosmological simulations

Scientists from the Excellence Cluster Universe at the Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität Munich have establised "Cosmowebportal", a unique data centre for cosmological simulations located at the Leibniz Supercomputing Centre (LRZ) of the Bavarian Academy of Sciences. The complete results of a series of large hydrodynamical cosmological simulations are available, with data volumes typically exceeding several hundred terabytes. Scientists worldwide can interactively explore these complex simulations via a web interface and directly access the results.

With current telescopes, scientists can observe our Universe’s galaxies and galaxy clusters and their distribution along an invisible cosmic web. From the...

Im Focus: Scientists develop molecular thermometer for contactless measurement using infrared light

Temperature measurements possible even on the smallest scale / Molecular ruby for use in material sciences, biology, and medicine

Chemists at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) in cooperation with researchers of the German Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing (BAM)...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Plants are networkers

19.06.2017 | Event News

Digital Survival Training for Executives

13.06.2017 | Event News

Global Learning Council Summit 2017

13.06.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Quantum thermometer or optical refrigerator?

23.06.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

A 100-year-old physics problem has been solved at EPFL

23.06.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Equipping form with function

23.06.2017 | Information Technology

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>