Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:


New radiotherapy regime benefits young women with breast cancer


Women under 35 years of age with breast cancer can have an almost 20% lower risk of their disease recurring if they are treated using a new radiotherapy regime. These were some of the results presented here today (Tuesday 26th October) by Prof Harry Bartelink and his colleagues at the 23rd Meeting of the European Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology.

The analyses were based on data from the EORTC (European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer) 22881 trial with updated follow-up (median follow-up: > 6years). 5318 patients with microscopically complete excision of early breast cancer using breast-conserving surgery were randomly assigned to undergo 50Gy irradiation of the whole breast either with or without an additional 16Gy of radiotherapy to the tumour bed (radiotherapy boost). 362 local recurrences were observed: 232 in the no-boost group and 130 in the boost group, demonstrating a considerable improvement in recurrence rate in women treated with boost.

The effect of the boost treatment was of greatest benefit in the younger women, with a reduction in 5-year local disease recurrence rate from 26% to 8.5% in women under 35 years of age. In women over 60 the boost dose resulted in a reduction of 5-year local recurrence rate from 3.9% to 2.1%. The addition of a boost dose caused a slight increase in early and late side effects and increases the burden on already overstretched resources. A balance therefore needs to be struck between providing optimal care with acceptable side effects whilst taking into account the availability of resources.

The trial data was used to estimate the impact on the 5-year local recurrence rate of a treatment policy restricting boost irradiation to patients below a certain age threshold. If no patients received a boost then the overall local recurrence rate would be 6.5%, whilst treating all patients with a boost would result in a recurrence rate of 3.6%. A policy limiting the boost dose to patients 40 years old or younger (or 8.4% of the total) would result in an overall 5-year local recurrence of 5.7% in the whole population. By increasing the threshold to 50 years (boost given to 34% of the total) the 5-year local recurrence rate reduces further to 4.8% - equivalent to the local control achieved by mastectomy.

“This evidence suggests that a 16Gy boost is a tolerable and viable alternative to total mastectomy, achieving similar local recurrence rates as the latter whilst sparing patients the necessity of breast removal”, said Prof Bartelink. “These results are so conclusive that this new approach should be immediately implemented in cancer treatment centres as a new standard of care for women under 51 years old”.

“Increasing the amount of radiation given in the boost dose for younger patients, those 50 years old or younger, may improve the results even further. This is currently being investigated in a new trial”, said Prof Bartelink. “Another trial, using microarray molecular technology, is also underway which aims to develop techniques which will predict how individual women will respond to radiotherapy and therefore predict which women should receive a boost dose”.

Stuart Bell | alfa
Further information:

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht Inflammation Triggers Unsustainable Immune Response to Chronic Viral Infection
24.10.2016 | Universität Basel

nachricht Resolving the mystery of preeclampsia
21.10.2016 | Universitätsklinikum Magdeburg

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Etching Microstructures with Lasers

Ultrafast lasers have introduced new possibilities in engraving ultrafine structures, and scientists are now also investigating how to use them to etch microstructures into thin glass. There are possible applications in analytics (lab on a chip) and especially in electronics and the consumer sector, where great interest has been shown.

This new method was born of a surprising phenomenon: irradiating glass in a particular way with an ultrafast laser has the effect of making the glass up to a...

Im Focus: Light-driven atomic rotations excite magnetic waves

Terahertz excitation of selected crystal vibrations leads to an effective magnetic field that drives coherent spin motion

Controlling functional properties by light is one of the grand goals in modern condensed matter physics and materials science. A new study now demonstrates how...

Im Focus: New 3-D wiring technique brings scalable quantum computers closer to reality

Researchers from the Institute for Quantum Computing (IQC) at the University of Waterloo led the development of a new extensible wiring technique capable of controlling superconducting quantum bits, representing a significant step towards to the realization of a scalable quantum computer.

"The quantum socket is a wiring method that uses three-dimensional wires based on spring-loaded pins to address individual qubits," said Jeremy Béjanin, a PhD...

Im Focus: Scientists develop a semiconductor nanocomposite material that moves in response to light

In a paper in Scientific Reports, a research team at Worcester Polytechnic Institute describes a novel light-activated phenomenon that could become the basis for applications as diverse as microscopic robotic grippers and more efficient solar cells.

A research team at Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI) has developed a revolutionary, light-activated semiconductor nanocomposite material that can be used...

Im Focus: Diamonds aren't forever: Sandia, Harvard team create first quantum computer bridge

By forcefully embedding two silicon atoms in a diamond matrix, Sandia researchers have demonstrated for the first time on a single chip all the components needed to create a quantum bridge to link quantum computers together.

"People have already built small quantum computers," says Sandia researcher Ryan Camacho. "Maybe the first useful one won't be a single giant quantum computer...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>



Event News

#IC2S2: When Social Science meets Computer Science - GESIS will host the IC2S2 conference 2017

14.10.2016 | Event News

Agricultural Trade Developments and Potentials in Central Asia and the South Caucasus

14.10.2016 | Event News

World Health Summit – Day Three: A Call to Action

12.10.2016 | Event News

Latest News

Ice shelf vibrations cause unusual waves in Antarctic atmosphere

25.10.2016 | Earth Sciences

Fluorescent holography: Upending the world of biological imaging

25.10.2016 | Power and Electrical Engineering

Etching Microstructures with Lasers

25.10.2016 | Process Engineering

More VideoLinks >>>