Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Gastric bypass surgery is riskiest for those who need it most

02.12.2003


The same health risks that make morbidly obese patients eligible for gastric bypass surgery also leave them susceptible to complications during and after the surgery, a study of 335 patients shows.



The patients all had Roux-en-Y gastric bypass at the University Hospitals of Cleveland from 1998 to 2002. Roux-en-Y is the most popular surgery in the treatment of severely obese patients to help weight loss. It involves stapling the upper stomach to create a small pouch that is then attached to the small intestine, reducing the capacity of the stomach. Subsequent radiologic imaging helped to identify 57 complications from the surgeries – many of them multiple problems in the same patients – including suture tears and leaks, pulmonary embolism, pneumonia and infection.

"This should not be considered a cosmetic procedure," said Elmar Merkle, M.D., the lead author of the study, who presented the findings today at the 89th Scientific Assembly and Annual Meeting of the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA). "People need to be aware of the potential complications of this surgery. It basically should be the last option we can offer the morbidly obese, after other less invasive interventions such as diet and exercise have been tried."


The number of gastrointestinal surgeries for weight loss is soaring, according to the American Society for Bariatric Surgery, which estimates that the 63,000 procedures performed in 2002 will increase to 100,000 this year. Americans who are at least 100 pounds overweight are eligible for gastrointestinal surgery, according to National Institutes of Health (NIH) guidelines, but a patient who is less than 100 pounds overweight may also be considered if there is a life-threatening condition related to his or her obesity, such as type 2 diabetes or cardiopulmonary problems.

"Severely obese patients are considered to be at high risk for any type of surgery because of these co-morbidities," said Dr. Merkle, currently associate professor in the department of radiology at Duke University Medical Center in Durham, N.C. "In addition, there is a wide spectrum of procedure-specific complications following Roux-en-Y gastric bypass."

In the study, there were eight reports of anastomotic leaks and five instances of staple line disruption in the stomach, complications specific to Roux-en-Y. Three incidents of pulmonary embolism, two cases of pneumonia, and single cases of severe infection and open abdominal wound disruption were also reported – complications that are more prevalent among severely overweight patients undergoing surgery, according to Dr. Merkle.

There were also two deaths within 30 days of the 335 surgeries, but no additional deaths have been reported in the nearly 600 gastric bypass surgeries performed to date.

"Gastric bypass surgery is not about losing weight the easy way and looking good – the operation is about improving health," Dr. Merkle said. "There should be a long-term commitment by the patient. Eating habits must change. For example, patients will need lifelong vitamin supplements. Some patients lose weight, then gain it back again. Not everyone gets the results they want, but they all face the risk of these complications."

Co-authors of the study were Thomas A. Stellato, M.D., the Charles A. Hubay M.D. Professor of Surgery, founder of the bariatric program at University Hospitals of Cleveland; Cathleen Crouse, R.N., the coordinator of the bariatric program at University Hospitals; Peter T. Hallowell, M.D., who performed part of the operations; and Dean Akira Nakamoto, M.D., the director of body imaging at University Hospitals.



RSNA is an association of more than 35,000 radiologists, radiation oncologists and related scientists committed to promoting excellence in radiology through education and by fostering research, with the ultimate goal of improving patient care. The Society is based in Oak Brook, Ill.

Maureen Morley | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.rsna.org/press03

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht Custom-tailored strategy against glioblastomas
26.09.2016 | Rheinische Friedrich-Wilhelms-Universität Bonn

nachricht New leukemia treatment offers hope
23.09.2016 | King Abdullah University of Science and Technology

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: First-Ever 3D Printed Excavator Project Advances Large-Scale Additive Manufacturing R&D

Heavy construction machinery is the focus of Oak Ridge National Laboratory’s latest advance in additive manufacturing research. With industry partners and university students, ORNL researchers are designing and producing the world’s first 3D printed excavator, a prototype that will leverage large-scale AM technologies and explore the feasibility of printing with metal alloys.

Increasing the size and speed of metal-based 3D printing techniques, using low-cost alloys like steel and aluminum, could create new industrial applications...

Im Focus: New welding process joins dissimilar sheets better

Friction stir welding is a still-young and thus often unfamiliar pressure welding process for joining flat components and semi-finished components made of light metals.
Scientists at the University of Stuttgart have now developed two new process variants that will considerably expand the areas of application for friction stir welding.
Technologie-Lizenz-Büro (TLB) GmbH supports the University of Stuttgart in patenting and marketing its innovations.

Friction stir welding is a still-young and thus often unfamiliar pressure welding process for joining flat components and semi-finished components made of...

Im Focus: First quantum photonic circuit with electrically driven light source

Optical quantum computers can revolutionize computer technology. A team of researchers led by scientists from Münster University and KIT now succeeded in putting a quantum optical experimental set-up onto a chip. In doing so, they have met one of the requirements for making it possible to use photonic circuits for optical quantum computers.

Optical quantum computers are what people are pinning their hopes on for tomorrow’s computer technology – whether for tap-proof data encryption, ultrafast...

Im Focus: OLED microdisplays in data glasses for improved human-machine interaction

The Fraunhofer Institute for Organic Electronics, Electron Beam and Plasma Technology FEP has been developing various applications for OLED microdisplays based on organic semiconductors. By integrating the capabilities of an image sensor directly into the microdisplay, eye movements can be recorded by the smart glasses and utilized for guidance and control functions, as one example. The new design will be debuted at Augmented World Expo Europe (AWE) in Berlin at Booth B25, October 18th – 19th.

“Augmented-reality” and “wearables” have become terms we encounter almost daily. Both can make daily life a little simpler and provide valuable assistance for...

Im Focus: Artificial Intelligence Helps in the Discovery of New Materials

With the help of artificial intelligence, chemists from the University of Basel in Switzerland have computed the characteristics of about two million crystals made up of four chemical elements. The researchers were able to identify 90 previously unknown thermodynamically stable crystals that can be regarded as new materials. They report on their findings in the scientific journal Physical Review Letters.

Elpasolite is a glassy, transparent, shiny and soft mineral with a cubic crystal structure. First discovered in El Paso County (Colorado, USA), it can also be...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Call for Paper – Panacea Green Infrastructure?

30.09.2016 | Event News

HLF: From an experiment to an establishment

29.09.2016 | Event News

European Health Forum Gastein 2016 kicks off today

28.09.2016 | Event News

 
Latest News

First-Ever 3D Printed Excavator Project Advances Large-Scale Additive Manufacturing R&D

30.09.2016 | Materials Sciences

New Technique for Finding Weakness in Earth’s Crust

30.09.2016 | Earth Sciences

Cells migrate collectively by intermittent bursts of activity

30.09.2016 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>