Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Prototype developed for ultrasonic patch to deliver insulin

23.10.2002


Penn State engineers have developed a prototype for an ultrasound insulin delivery system that is about the size and weight of a matchbook that can be worn as a patch on the body.



Dr. Nadine Barrie Smith, assistant professor of bioengineering, says, "The new Penn State ultrasound patch, which operates in the same frequency range as the large commercially available sonic drug delivery devices, is about an inch-and-a-half by an inch-and-a-half in size and weighs less than an ounce. Commercially available sonicators currently have a probe about eight inches long which weighs over two pounds."

Experiments with human skin and with live rats have shown that the new ultrasound patch delivers therapeutically effective doses of insulin.


The new prototype is described in detail in "Transducer Design for a Portable Ultrasound Enhanced Transdermal Drug-Delivery System," published in the current (October) issue of the IEEE Transactions on Ultrasonics, Ferroelectrics and Frequency Control.

The key to the new ultrasound patch is a "cymbal" transducer developed by Dr. Robert Newnham, the Alcoa professor emeritus of solid state science. The transducer produces the sound waves that drive the medication through the skin and into the blood stream. The cymbal transducer consists of a thin disk of piezoelectric ceramic material sandwiched between titanium end caps shaped like cymbals. Four of these transducers are used in the prototype.

A thin reservoir of insulin is placed in front of the cymbal transducer and when a current is applied, sound waves just above the level of human hearing push the medication through the skin and into the blood vessels.

Smith notes, "Our experiments with rats show that an exposure of 20 minutes produced the same result as a 60-minute exposure. So, we are hopeful that, eventually, we may be able to tune the system so that one to five minutes of exposure may be enough."

Currently, diabetics must either inject insulin via hypodermic needles or use a mini-pump with a catheter that remains implanted in their body. Ultrasound offers a less painful and invasive alternative.

Besides insulin, some medications used to treat AIDS, pain relievers, asthma drugs, and hormones are deliverable via ultrasound, Smith adds. Those medications and, perhaps, some others that cannot be taken by mouth, are candidates for administration via the new ultrasound patch.


Her co-authors are Emiliano Maione, graduate student; Dr. K. Kirk Shung, professor of bioengineering; Dr. Richard J. Meyer, research associate at Penn State’s Applied Research Laboratory (ARL); Dr. Jack W. Hughes, ARL Senior scientist and professor of acoustics; Newnham; and Smith. The rat experiments are described in "Ultrasound Mediated Transdermal in vivo Transport of Insulin with Low Profile Cymbal Arrays," presented this month at the IEEE 2002 Ultrasonics Symposium in Munich, Germany. The authors are Seungjun Lee, graduate student, Smith and Shung.

The research was supported, in part, with laboratory start-up funds provided to Smith by the University.

Barbara Hale | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.psu.edu/

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht Electrical 'switch' in brain's capillary network monitors activity and controls blood flow
27.03.2017 | Larner College of Medicine at the University of Vermont

nachricht Laser activated gold pyramids could deliver drugs, DNA into cells without harm
24.03.2017 | Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Giant Magnetic Fields in the Universe

Astronomers from Bonn and Tautenburg in Thuringia (Germany) used the 100-m radio telescope at Effelsberg to observe several galaxy clusters. At the edges of these large accumulations of dark matter, stellar systems (galaxies), hot gas, and charged particles, they found magnetic fields that are exceptionally ordered over distances of many million light years. This makes them the most extended magnetic fields in the universe known so far.

The results will be published on March 22 in the journal „Astronomy & Astrophysics“.

Galaxy clusters are the largest gravitationally bound structures in the universe. With a typical extent of about 10 million light years, i.e. 100 times the...

Im Focus: Tracing down linear ubiquitination

Researchers at the Goethe University Frankfurt, together with partners from the University of Tübingen in Germany and Queen Mary University as well as Francis Crick Institute from London (UK) have developed a novel technology to decipher the secret ubiquitin code.

Ubiquitin is a small protein that can be linked to other cellular proteins, thereby controlling and modulating their functions. The attachment occurs in many...

Im Focus: Perovskite edges can be tuned for optoelectronic performance

Layered 2D material improves efficiency for solar cells and LEDs

In the eternal search for next generation high-efficiency solar cells and LEDs, scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory and their partners are creating...

Im Focus: Polymer-coated silicon nanosheets as alternative to graphene: A perfect team for nanoelectronics

Silicon nanosheets are thin, two-dimensional layers with exceptional optoelectronic properties very similar to those of graphene. Albeit, the nanosheets are less stable. Now researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have, for the first time ever, produced a composite material combining silicon nanosheets and a polymer that is both UV-resistant and easy to process. This brings the scientists a significant step closer to industrial applications like flexible displays and photosensors.

Silicon nanosheets are thin, two-dimensional layers with exceptional optoelectronic properties very similar to those of graphene. Albeit, the nanosheets are...

Im Focus: Researchers Imitate Molecular Crowding in Cells

Enzymes behave differently in a test tube compared with the molecular scrum of a living cell. Chemists from the University of Basel have now been able to simulate these confined natural conditions in artificial vesicles for the first time. As reported in the academic journal Small, the results are offering better insight into the development of nanoreactors and artificial organelles.

Enzymes behave differently in a test tube compared with the molecular scrum of a living cell. Chemists from the University of Basel have now been able to...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

International Land Use Symposium ILUS 2017: Call for Abstracts and Registration open

20.03.2017 | Event News

CONNECT 2017: International congress on connective tissue

14.03.2017 | Event News

ICTM Conference: Turbine Construction between Big Data and Additive Manufacturing

07.03.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Electrical 'switch' in brain's capillary network monitors activity and controls blood flow

27.03.2017 | Health and Medicine

Clock stars: Astrocytes keep time for brain, behavior

27.03.2017 | Life Sciences

Sun's impact on climate change quantified for first time

27.03.2017 | Earth Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>