Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

England and Wales lead reduction in cancer deaths and increase in cancer spend

28.07.2008
Cancer deaths per diagnosis down since 1980

Developed world cancer mortality down across the board

A comprehensive analysis, published in the online journal ecancermedicalscience, has detailed how cancer death rates in developed countries have fallen substantially in the last 20 years, despite a general increase in the prevalence of cancer.

It was also found that despite recent reports highlighting the UK’s poor cancer performance compared to the rest of Europe and the USA (which led to the UK being branded the ‘sick man of Europe’) England and Wales have seen the largest increase in spending on health of any country, and largest reduction in cancer deaths overall except the Netherlands. The researchers, based at Bournemouth University, found that England and Wales’ health spend increased by 66%, compared to an average rise of 39%, whilst average male cancer deaths (15 to 74 years) decreased by 25%, compared to an average of 12% amongst other major developed countries. Men in England and Wales now have a lower cancer death rate than men in the USA.

Studying World Health Organisation figures for 1979-1980 and 2000-2002, they also found that, with the exception of Japan and Spain, cancer deaths for men declined significantly more than for women. The authors suggest that this may be due to the impact of life-style changes on women as more enter the work force.

The authors propose that the reduction in cancer deaths is influenced by increased expenditure including the use of newer, and invariably more costly, anti-cancer drugs, but also note that: "Despite the recent increase in the health expenditure of England & Wales (9.3%), it remains below the average (9.85%), and only Japan and Spain, amongst the major developed countries*, spent less. Nonetheless, the Anglo-Welsh increase was the highest and the correlation between a reduction in cancer deaths and increased national expenditures on health, should encourage Governments to respond to the challenge.

The reduction in malignancy deaths in all the countries studied, especially amongst the under 74’s, should be a boost for the patient morale, their families and front-line staff, and particularly in England & Wales. However, this encouraging improvement should not distract from the increased incidence of cancer, especially in England & Wales, as well as the continuing negative link with socio-economic factors."

So whilst the UK is still lagging behind the US and most other countries’ spend on health, it appears to be doing more with proportionately less.

However, lead author Professor Colin Pritchard concludes: "Whilst it may be true to say that the treatment of cancer has never been better, still more needs to be done, especially when facing the challenges posed by the increasing incidence of malignancies in the general population."

Linda Cairns | alfa
Further information:
http://www.ecancermedicalscience.com

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht Spanish scientists create a 3-D bioprinter to print human skin
24.01.2017 | Carlos III University of Madrid

nachricht Tracking movement of immune cells identifies key first steps in inflammatory arthritis
23.01.2017 | Massachusetts General Hospital

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Scientists spin artificial silk from whey protein

X-ray study throws light on key process for production

A Swedish-German team of researchers has cleared up a key process for the artificial production of silk. With the help of the intense X-rays from DESY's...

Im Focus: Quantum optical sensor for the first time tested in space – with a laser system from Berlin

For the first time ever, a cloud of ultra-cold atoms has been successfully created in space on board of a sounding rocket. The MAIUS mission demonstrates that quantum optical sensors can be operated even in harsh environments like space – a prerequi-site for finding answers to the most challenging questions of fundamental physics and an important innovation driver for everyday applications.

According to Albert Einstein's Equivalence Principle, all bodies are accelerated at the same rate by the Earth's gravity, regardless of their properties. This...

Im Focus: Traffic jam in empty space

New success for Konstanz physicists in studying the quantum vacuum

An important step towards a completely new experimental access to quantum physics has been made at University of Konstanz. The team of scientists headed by...

Im Focus: How gut bacteria can make us ill

HZI researchers decipher infection mechanisms of Yersinia and immune responses of the host

Yersiniae cause severe intestinal infections. Studies using Yersinia pseudotuberculosis as a model organism aim to elucidate the infection mechanisms of these...

Im Focus: Interfacial Superconductivity: Magnetic and superconducting order revealed simultaneously

Researchers from the University of Hamburg in Germany, in collaboration with colleagues from the University of Aarhus in Denmark, have synthesized a new superconducting material by growing a few layers of an antiferromagnetic transition-metal chalcogenide on a bismuth-based topological insulator, both being non-superconducting materials.

While superconductivity and magnetism are generally believed to be mutually exclusive, surprisingly, in this new material, superconducting correlations...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Sustainable Water use in Agriculture in Eastern Europe and Central Asia

19.01.2017 | Event News

12V, 48V, high-voltage – trends in E/E automotive architecture

10.01.2017 | Event News

2nd Conference on Non-Textual Information on 10 and 11 May 2017 in Hannover

09.01.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Breaking the optical bandwidth record of stable pulsed lasers

24.01.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Choreographing the microRNA-target dance

24.01.2017 | Life Sciences

Spanish scientists create a 3-D bioprinter to print human skin

24.01.2017 | Health and Medicine

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>