Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Researcher draws up guidelines for evaluation of psychological side-effects of brain injury

21.02.2008
In her PhD, defended at the University of the Basque Country, Maria Luisa de Francisco Maiz provided a clinical-forensic evaluation of brain injuries and also a study on the variables that influence the length of “legal time periods”.

Brain injuries are a serious problem in the industrialised countries, not only for their high incidence but also because they mainly affect young people. At a clinical level, the increase in the efficacy of intensive medical treatments has enabled a drop in the rates of mortality but this fact has generated, in turn, an increase in the number of persons affected by the consequences or after-effects of brain injury. Amongst the various consequences, the neuropsychological and neuropsychiatric ones pose the greatest difficulty for assessment and estimation/quantification of damage

The prevalence of neuropsychological and neuropsychiatric disorders amongst those affected by brain injury is very high, given that the incidence of brain damage from injuries received is between 200 and 300 cases for every 100,000 inhabitants.

The PhD of Maria Luisa de Francisco Maiz was read at the Faculty of Psychology of the University of the Basque Country (UPV/EHU) and provided a clinical-forensic evaluation of brain injuries and also a study on the variables that influence the length of “legal time periods”.

The PhD, entitled Aportaciones a la evaluación clínico-forense de secuelas neuropsiquiátricas y neuropsicológicas de los traumatismos craneoencefálicos (Contributions to a clinical-forensic evaluation of the neuropsychological and neuropsychiatric consequences of brain injuries), was led by Professor of the Department of Personality, Evaluation and Pyschological Treatment, Enrique Echeburúa Odriozola, and received First Class Honours cum laude.

Maria Luisa de Francisco Maiz is a graduate in General Medicine and Surgery from the UPV/EHU and currently directs Forensic Medicine at the Basque Institute of Legal Medicine.

After-effects and legal time periods

The main aim of this PhD was to provide a clinical-forensic evaluation of brain injuries, protocolising the evaluation and putting forward guidelines for the clinical and functional assessment of their neuropsychological and neuropsychiatric consequences.

One of the objectives of this research was to find out the variables that influence the duration of “legal time periods”: the time taken for curing, the period of disability and time of hospitalisation. These time periods are used by judges and courts to assess indemnities for corporal damage, and so, in part at least, they bear on the amount of indemnity. Corporal damage is calculated taking into account the consequences or after-effects of the brain injury: physical, neurological, neuropsychological and neuropsychiatric.

To this end, a wide-ranging review was undertaken of the theoretical aspects of the after-effects of brain injuries. With this information a protocol for a clinical-forensic evaluation to enable the diagnosis of these neuropsychological and neuropsychiatric consequences was drawn up and put forward. Likewise, a system was proposed for the evaluation of the psychological side effects corresponding to the international classifications of mental illnesses.

Main conclusions

The researcher pointed out that “in the clinical-forensic evaluation for neuropsychological and neuropsychiatric after-effects of brain injuries, the guidelines will aid the initial assessments”.

According to this study, female patients that have suffered brain injury are hospitalized for longer periods. As regards the period of curing and disability, however, there were no significant differences between the sexes.

These legal time periods are not linked to the presence or otherwise of cranial fracture but they are greater when brain damage has taken place in the left hemisphere.

“There are various limitations when evaluating the neuropsychological and neuropsychiatric consequences of brain injuries and this work is aimed at facilitating this evaluation”, Ms de Francisco Maiz concluded.

Irati Kortabitarte | alfa
Further information:
http://www.basqueresearch.com/berria_irakurri.asp?Berri_Kod=1643&hizk=I

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht Norovirus evades immune system by hiding out in rare gut cells
12.10.2017 | University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

nachricht Flexible sensors can detect movement in GI tract
11.10.2017 | Massachusetts Institute of Technology

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Smart sensors for efficient processes

Material defects in end products can quickly result in failures in many areas of industry, and have a massive impact on the safe use of their products. This is why, in the field of quality assurance, intelligent, nondestructive sensor systems play a key role. They allow testing components and parts in a rapid and cost-efficient manner without destroying the actual product or changing its surface. Experts from the Fraunhofer IZFP in Saarbrücken will be presenting two exhibits at the Blechexpo in Stuttgart from 7–10 November 2017 that allow fast, reliable, and automated characterization of materials and detection of defects (Hall 5, Booth 5306).

When quality testing uses time-consuming destructive test methods, it can result in enormous costs due to damaging or destroying the products. And given that...

Im Focus: Cold molecules on collision course

Using a new cooling technique MPQ scientists succeed at observing collisions in a dense beam of cold and slow dipolar molecules.

How do chemical reactions proceed at extremely low temperatures? The answer requires the investigation of molecular samples that are cold, dense, and slow at...

Im Focus: Shrinking the proton again!

Scientists from the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics, using high precision laser spectroscopy of atomic hydrogen, confirm the surprisingly small value of the proton radius determined from muonic hydrogen.

It was one of the breakthroughs of the year 2010: Laser spectroscopy of muonic hydrogen resulted in a value for the proton charge radius that was significantly...

Im Focus: New nanomaterial can extract hydrogen fuel from seawater

Hybrid material converts more sunlight and can weather seawater's harsh conditions

It's possible to produce hydrogen to power fuel cells by extracting the gas from seawater, but the electricity required to do it makes the process costly. UCF...

Im Focus: Small collisions make big impact on Mercury's thin atmosphere

Mercury, our smallest planetary neighbor, has very little to call an atmosphere, but it does have a strange weather pattern: morning micro-meteor showers.

Recent modeling along with previously published results from NASA's MESSENGER spacecraft -- short for Mercury Surface, Space Environment, Geochemistry and...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

World Health Summit 2017: International experts set the course for the future of Global Health

10.10.2017 | Event News

Climate Engineering Conference 2017 Opens in Berlin

10.10.2017 | Event News

Conference Week RRR2017 on Renewable Resources from Wet and Rewetted Peatlands

28.09.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

A single photon reveals quantum entanglement of 16 million atoms

16.10.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

The melting ice makes the sea around Greenland less saline

16.10.2017 | Earth Sciences

On the generation of solar spicules and Alfvenic waves

16.10.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>