Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Researcher draws up guidelines for evaluation of psychological side-effects of brain injury

21.02.2008
In her PhD, defended at the University of the Basque Country, Maria Luisa de Francisco Maiz provided a clinical-forensic evaluation of brain injuries and also a study on the variables that influence the length of “legal time periods”.

Brain injuries are a serious problem in the industrialised countries, not only for their high incidence but also because they mainly affect young people. At a clinical level, the increase in the efficacy of intensive medical treatments has enabled a drop in the rates of mortality but this fact has generated, in turn, an increase in the number of persons affected by the consequences or after-effects of brain injury. Amongst the various consequences, the neuropsychological and neuropsychiatric ones pose the greatest difficulty for assessment and estimation/quantification of damage

The prevalence of neuropsychological and neuropsychiatric disorders amongst those affected by brain injury is very high, given that the incidence of brain damage from injuries received is between 200 and 300 cases for every 100,000 inhabitants.

The PhD of Maria Luisa de Francisco Maiz was read at the Faculty of Psychology of the University of the Basque Country (UPV/EHU) and provided a clinical-forensic evaluation of brain injuries and also a study on the variables that influence the length of “legal time periods”.

The PhD, entitled Aportaciones a la evaluación clínico-forense de secuelas neuropsiquiátricas y neuropsicológicas de los traumatismos craneoencefálicos (Contributions to a clinical-forensic evaluation of the neuropsychological and neuropsychiatric consequences of brain injuries), was led by Professor of the Department of Personality, Evaluation and Pyschological Treatment, Enrique Echeburúa Odriozola, and received First Class Honours cum laude.

Maria Luisa de Francisco Maiz is a graduate in General Medicine and Surgery from the UPV/EHU and currently directs Forensic Medicine at the Basque Institute of Legal Medicine.

After-effects and legal time periods

The main aim of this PhD was to provide a clinical-forensic evaluation of brain injuries, protocolising the evaluation and putting forward guidelines for the clinical and functional assessment of their neuropsychological and neuropsychiatric consequences.

One of the objectives of this research was to find out the variables that influence the duration of “legal time periods”: the time taken for curing, the period of disability and time of hospitalisation. These time periods are used by judges and courts to assess indemnities for corporal damage, and so, in part at least, they bear on the amount of indemnity. Corporal damage is calculated taking into account the consequences or after-effects of the brain injury: physical, neurological, neuropsychological and neuropsychiatric.

To this end, a wide-ranging review was undertaken of the theoretical aspects of the after-effects of brain injuries. With this information a protocol for a clinical-forensic evaluation to enable the diagnosis of these neuropsychological and neuropsychiatric consequences was drawn up and put forward. Likewise, a system was proposed for the evaluation of the psychological side effects corresponding to the international classifications of mental illnesses.

Main conclusions

The researcher pointed out that “in the clinical-forensic evaluation for neuropsychological and neuropsychiatric after-effects of brain injuries, the guidelines will aid the initial assessments”.

According to this study, female patients that have suffered brain injury are hospitalized for longer periods. As regards the period of curing and disability, however, there were no significant differences between the sexes.

These legal time periods are not linked to the presence or otherwise of cranial fracture but they are greater when brain damage has taken place in the left hemisphere.

“There are various limitations when evaluating the neuropsychological and neuropsychiatric consequences of brain injuries and this work is aimed at facilitating this evaluation”, Ms de Francisco Maiz concluded.

Irati Kortabitarte | alfa
Further information:
http://www.basqueresearch.com/berria_irakurri.asp?Berri_Kod=1643&hizk=I

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht Routing gene therapy directly into the brain
07.12.2017 | Boston Children's Hospital

nachricht New Hope for Cancer Therapies: Targeted Monitoring may help Improve Tumor Treatment
01.12.2017 | Berliner Institut für Gesundheitsforschung / Berlin Institute of Health (BIH)

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Long-lived storage of a photonic qubit for worldwide teleportation

MPQ scientists achieve long storage times for photonic quantum bits which break the lower bound for direct teleportation in a global quantum network.

Concerning the development of quantum memories for the realization of global quantum networks, scientists of the Quantum Dynamics Division led by Professor...

Im Focus: Electromagnetic water cloak eliminates drag and wake

Detailed calculations show water cloaks are feasible with today's technology

Researchers have developed a water cloaking concept based on electromagnetic forces that could eliminate an object's wake, greatly reducing its drag while...

Im Focus: Scientists channel graphene to understand filtration and ion transport into cells

Tiny pores at a cell's entryway act as miniature bouncers, letting in some electrically charged atoms--ions--but blocking others. Operating as exquisitely sensitive filters, these "ion channels" play a critical role in biological functions such as muscle contraction and the firing of brain cells.

To rapidly transport the right ions through the cell membrane, the tiny channels rely on a complex interplay between the ions and surrounding molecules,...

Im Focus: Towards data storage at the single molecule level

The miniaturization of the current technology of storage media is hindered by fundamental limits of quantum mechanics. A new approach consists in using so-called spin-crossover molecules as the smallest possible storage unit. Similar to normal hard drives, these special molecules can save information via their magnetic state. A research team from Kiel University has now managed to successfully place a new class of spin-crossover molecules onto a surface and to improve the molecule’s storage capacity. The storage density of conventional hard drives could therefore theoretically be increased by more than one hundred fold. The study has been published in the scientific journal Nano Letters.

Over the past few years, the building blocks of storage media have gotten ever smaller. But further miniaturization of the current technology is hindered by...

Im Focus: Successful Mechanical Testing of Nanowires

With innovative experiments, researchers at the Helmholtz-Zentrums Geesthacht and the Technical University Hamburg unravel why tiny metallic structures are extremely strong

Light-weight and simultaneously strong – porous metallic nanomaterials promise interesting applications as, for instance, for future aeroplanes with enhanced...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

See, understand and experience the work of the future

11.12.2017 | Event News

Innovative strategies to tackle parasitic worms

08.12.2017 | Event News

AKL’18: The opportunities and challenges of digitalization in the laser industry

07.12.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Long-lived storage of a photonic qubit for worldwide teleportation

12.12.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Multi-year submarine-canyon study challenges textbook theories about turbidity currents

12.12.2017 | Earth Sciences

Electromagnetic water cloak eliminates drag and wake

12.12.2017 | Power and Electrical Engineering

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>