Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Portable finger-probe device can successfully measure liver function in potential organ donors

29.05.2015

Finding may save thousands of dollars spent on surgical evaluation teams

A portable, finger-probe device successfully measured liver function in brain dead adult organ donors, a finding that could change the way organs are assessed and save thousands of dollars per transplant, a UCLA study has found.


This device successfully measured liver function in potential organ donors

Credit: Pulsion

Working with OneLegacy, the non-profit organ and tissue recovery organization serving the greater Los Angeles area, UCLA researchers measured liver function in 53 potential organ donors in a blind study of the device. Eleven livers were declined because of poor quality and the other 42 were transplanted and their function tested later to compare to the results obtained using the device, said study first author Dr. Ali Zarrinpar, an assistant professor of surgery in the Division of Liver and Pancreas Transplantation.

"This device is best single predictor of organ survival in our patients," Zarrinpar said. "Ultimately, what it does is gives us a quantitative measure of how good a liver is without having to visually inspect the organ. It gives us a measurement to talk about when we're thinking about whether to transplant an organ into a recipient."

The study appears in the early online edition of the Journal of Surgical Research.

Although there are accurate and reliable function tests for other donor organs, this is not the case for livers, Zarrinpar said.

Currently, depending on a thorough assessment of a potential donor's medical history, multiple blood tests and any hospital treatments, a surgical team from the recipient's medical center is dispatched to the donor's location to visually inspect and potentially procure the organ. That team costs thousands of dollars per procedure, Zarrinpar said, and about 10 to 15 percent of the time the organ is deemed unusable.

On the flip side, an organ from a patient with a questionable history or borderline laboratory results may be considered a waste of the surgical team's time and the retrieval effort abandoned. However, this device could easily be used to test organ function in such marginal donors, so its use could increase of number of organs used for transplant.

"Although the number of transplant candidates continues to grow, organ availability has plateaued, resulting in more patients dying while on transplant waiting lists," Zarrinpar said. "This device, which can be used in any hospital, could help increase the number of donor livers and help save very sick patients waiting for transplant."

The device operates much like a pulse oximeter, which attaches to the finger to measure oxygen in the blood. In this case, the device measures the rate at which a dye, injected into the potential donor's bloodstream, is cleared by the liver. This novel, non-invasive and rapid test successfully predicted which livers would function properly in transplant patients, Zarrinpar said.

A liver transplant may involve the whole liver, a reduced liver, or a liver segment. Most transplants involve the whole organ, but transplants using segments of the liver have been performed with increasing frequency in recent years. This would allow two liver recipients to be transplanted from one donor or to allow for living donor liver donation.

Every year, more than 1,500 people die waiting for a donated liver to become available. Currently, about 17,000 adults and children have been medically approved for liver transplants and are waiting for donated livers to become available, according to the American Liver Foundation.

"These data warrant further exploration in a larger trial in a variety of settings to evaluate acceptable values for donated livers," the study states. "At a time of increasing regional sharing and calls for national organ sharing, this method would assist in the standardization of graft evaluation. It could also lead to increasing liver graft utilization while decreasing travel risk and expenses."

The research was funded by the Dumont-UCLA Transplant Center and the National Institutes of Health (UL1TR000124).

The liver transplant program at UCLA was inaugurated in 1984 and has grown to be the most active program in the world. Since the program's inception, liver transplants have been performed at UCLA for infants, children and adults, focusing on innovative surgical techniques, advances in immunosuppressive drugs and quality patient care.

As the most experienced liver transplantation program in the western United States, UCLA serves patients from California, Oregon, Washington, and throughout the Southwest, and acts as a tertiary referral center for other transplant programs faced with particularly challenging cases.

Kim Irwin | EurekAlert!

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht Biofilm discovery suggests new way to prevent dangerous infections
23.05.2017 | University of Texas at Austin

nachricht Another reason to exercise: Burning bone fat -- a key to better bone health
19.05.2017 | University of North Carolina Health Care

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Can the immune system be boosted against Staphylococcus aureus by delivery of messenger RNA?

Staphylococcus aureus is a feared pathogen (MRSA, multi-resistant S. aureus) due to frequent resistances against many antibiotics, especially in hospital infections. Researchers at the Paul-Ehrlich-Institut have identified immunological processes that prevent a successful immune response directed against the pathogenic agent. The delivery of bacterial proteins with RNA adjuvant or messenger RNA (mRNA) into immune cells allows the re-direction of the immune response towards an active defense against S. aureus. This could be of significant importance for the development of an effective vaccine. PLOS Pathogens has published these research results online on 25 May 2017.

Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) is a bacterium that colonizes by far more than half of the skin and the mucosa of adults, usually without causing infections....

Im Focus: A quantum walk of photons

Physicists from the University of Würzburg are capable of generating identical looking single light particles at the push of a button. Two new studies now demonstrate the potential this method holds.

The quantum computer has fuelled the imagination of scientists for decades: It is based on fundamentally different phenomena than a conventional computer....

Im Focus: Turmoil in sluggish electrons’ existence

An international team of physicists has monitored the scattering behaviour of electrons in a non-conducting material in real-time. Their insights could be beneficial for radiotherapy.

We can refer to electrons in non-conducting materials as ‘sluggish’. Typically, they remain fixed in a location, deep inside an atomic composite. It is hence...

Im Focus: Wafer-thin Magnetic Materials Developed for Future Quantum Technologies

Two-dimensional magnetic structures are regarded as a promising material for new types of data storage, since the magnetic properties of individual molecular building blocks can be investigated and modified. For the first time, researchers have now produced a wafer-thin ferrimagnet, in which molecules with different magnetic centers arrange themselves on a gold surface to form a checkerboard pattern. Scientists at the Swiss Nanoscience Institute at the University of Basel and the Paul Scherrer Institute published their findings in the journal Nature Communications.

Ferrimagnets are composed of two centers which are magnetized at different strengths and point in opposing directions. Two-dimensional, quasi-flat ferrimagnets...

Im Focus: World's thinnest hologram paves path to new 3-D world

Nano-hologram paves way for integration of 3-D holography into everyday electronics

An Australian-Chinese research team has created the world's thinnest hologram, paving the way towards the integration of 3D holography into everyday...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Marine Conservation: IASS Contributes to UN Ocean Conference in New York on 5-9 June

24.05.2017 | Event News

AWK Aachen Machine Tool Colloquium 2017: Internet of Production for Agile Enterprises

23.05.2017 | Event News

Dortmund MST Conference presents Individualized Healthcare Solutions with micro and nanotechnology

22.05.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

How herpesviruses win the footrace against the immune system

26.05.2017 | Life Sciences

Water forms 'spine of hydration' around DNA, group finds

26.05.2017 | Life Sciences

First Juno science results supported by University of Leicester's Jupiter 'forecast'

26.05.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>