Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Neonatal intensive care units critical to infant survival

02.09.2010
Very low birthweight and very preterm infants are more likely to die if they are not born at hospitals with neonatal intensive care units specially equipped to care for seriously ill newborns, in contrast to similar babies born at those specialized facilities.

"We encourage women who have high risk pregnancies to talk with their health care provider about the care their baby may need after birth and about the appropriate hospital where they should deliver so their newborn can receive the proper NICU level of care," said Diane Ashton, MD, MPH, March of Dimes deputy medical director.

A model for a regionalized system of neonatal intensive care units, (NICUs), to enable sick babies in all parts of the United States to get the specialized care they need, while managing costs, was outlined by a 1976 report called "Toward Improving the Outcomes Pregnancy" developed by the Committee on Perinatal Health and the March of Dimes. This report, which recommended Level I hospitals provide basic care, Level II hospitals care for moderately ill infants, and Level III NICU facilities take the most seriously sick babies, has been credited with improving the national infant mortality rate.

"The initial success of this system of regionalized perinatal care saved the lives of thousands of infants over the years," said Dr. Ashton, noting that it is not always possible for women to too choose where they deliver. Over time, the regional system has weakened and more seriously ill babies are being born outside Level III NICUs.

The March of Dimes and its partners this winter will publish "Toward Improving the Outcome of Pregnancy III, which will include new recommendations on quality improvement efforts for women and health care providers to help more babies be born healthy.

Very-low birth weight babies, those who weigh about 3.3 pounds at birth, and very preterm infants, those born at less than 32 weeks gestation, had a more than 50 percent increase in the risk of dying before they were a month old or discharged, if they were not born at a Level III hospital, according to the research by investigators led by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, CDC, published in the Sept. 1 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

"We should continue our efforts to prevent preterm birth altogether. Yet when a pregnant woman is at risk for delivering a very low birth weight or very premature baby, we should provide the best and most risk-appropriate care possible," said CAPT Wanda D. Barfield, MD, MPH, director, of the CDC's Division of Reproductive Health, and a co-author of the study. "We were happy to do the research that could benefit both parents and health care providers in making the best possible choices for care."

In 2006, the infant mortality rate declined to 6.7 out of every 1,000 live births from 6.9 in 2005, according to the National Center for Health Statistics. Despite the decline, more than 28,500 babies died in 2006 before they were a year old, and babies who died from preterm birth-related causes accounted for more than 36 percent of infant deaths.

The March of Dimes is supporting a Congressional Briefing hosted by National Healthy Start Association and sponsored by Congressman Steve Cohen (D-TN) as part of activities surrounding September's designation as Infant Mortality Awareness Month.

The March of Dimes is the leading nonprofit organization for pregnancy and baby health. With chapters nationwide and its premier event, March for Babies®, the March of Dimes works to improve the health of babies by preventing birth defects, premature birth and infant mortality. For the latest resources and information, visit marchofdimes.com or nacersano.org. For detailed national, state and local perinatal statistics, visit PeriStats at marchofdimes.com/peristats.

Elizabeth Lynch | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.marchofdimes.com

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht Scientists learn more about how gene linked to autism affects brain
19.06.2018 | Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center

nachricht Overdosing on Calcium
19.06.2018 | Albert-Ludwigs-Universität Freiburg im Breisgau

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Overdosing on Calcium

Nano crystals impact stem cell fate during bone formation

Scientists from the University of Freiburg and the University of Basel identified a master regulator for bone regeneration. Prasad Shastri, Professor of...

Im Focus: AchemAsia 2019 will take place in Shanghai

Moving into its fourth decade, AchemAsia is setting out for new horizons: The International Expo and Innovation Forum for Sustainable Chemical Production will take place from 21-23 May 2019 in Shanghai, China. With an updated event profile, the eleventh edition focusses on topics that are especially relevant for the Chinese process industry, putting a strong emphasis on sustainability and innovation.

Founded in 1989 as a spin-off of ACHEMA to cater to the needs of China’s then developing industry, AchemAsia has since grown into a platform where the latest...

Im Focus: First real-time test of Li-Fi utilization for the industrial Internet of Things

The BMBF-funded OWICELLS project was successfully completed with a final presentation at the BMW plant in Munich. The presentation demonstrated a Li-Fi communication with a mobile robot, while the robot carried out usual production processes (welding, moving and testing parts) in a 5x5m² production cell. The robust, optical wireless transmission is based on spatial diversity; in other words, data is sent and received simultaneously by several LEDs and several photodiodes. The system can transmit data at more than 100 Mbit/s and five milliseconds latency.

Modern production technologies in the automobile industry must become more flexible in order to fulfil individual customer requirements.

Im Focus: Sharp images with flexible fibers

An international team of scientists has discovered a new way to transfer image information through multimodal fibers with almost no distortion - even if the fiber is bent. The results of the study, to which scientist from the Leibniz-Institute of Photonic Technology Jena (Leibniz IPHT) contributed, were published on 6thJune in the highly-cited journal Physical Review Letters.

Endoscopes allow doctors to see into a patient’s body like through a keyhole. Typically, the images are transmitted via a bundle of several hundreds of optical...

Im Focus: Photoexcited graphene puzzle solved

A boost for graphene-based light detectors

Light detection and control lies at the heart of many modern device applications, such as smartphone cameras. Using graphene as a light-sensitive material for...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

Munich conference on asteroid detection, tracking and defense

13.06.2018 | Event News

2nd International Baltic Earth Conference in Denmark: “The Baltic Sea region in Transition”

08.06.2018 | Event News

ISEKI_Food 2018: Conference with Holistic View of Food Production

05.06.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Carbon nanotube optics provide optical-based quantum cryptography and quantum computing

19.06.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

How to track and trace a protein: Nanosensors monitor intracellular deliveries

19.06.2018 | Life Sciences

New material for splitting water

19.06.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>