Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Detection of genetic commonality between various psychiatric disorders

28.08.2013
Do differing psychiatric disorders have genetic commonality?

Researchers addressed this question in an international study. This investigated the degree of genetic commonality between five psychiatric illnesses that are particularly common in the general population: schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, major depression, autism, and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).

The results demonstrate a strong genetic correlation between schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. A less pronounced but nonetheless clear overlap was also detected between major depression and the disorders bipolar disorder and schizophrenia, as well as between bipolar disorder and ADHD. The results of the study, which involved scientists from the CIMH, have now been published in the scientific journal Nature Genetics.

While environmental factors are implicated in the development of psychiatric disorders, the contribution of inherited factors is of particular importance in terms of disease-risk. Family studies have demonstrated an overlap in terms of genetic factors between individual, diagnostically defined clinical disorders. The recent advent of genome-wide research methods has allowed systematic investigation of this overlap at the molecular level. The study involved more than 300 international researchers, including a number of German scientists from the National Genome Research Network “MooDs”, which aims to investigate the molecular causes of affective and schizophrenia disorders.

During the course of the study, around 1 million variable positions in the genome, so-called “Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms” (SNPs), were compared between more than 75,000 individuals. This involved patients with schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, major depression, autism, and ADHD, as well as healthy control individuals.

„Once again, this study shows that our approach of systematically investigating the genome for the causes of psychiatric illness is successful,“ emphasized the coordinator of the Research Network Professor Markus Nöthen from the Institute of Human Genetics at the University of Bonn. “The limiting factor, however, is that the success of such investigations is dependent upon the number of participating patients, particularly since the symptoms of diseases and disease-progression vary so widely across the patients,” pointed out Professor Marcella Rietschel, Scientific Director of the Department of Genetic Epidemiology in Psychiatry at the CIMH. Ultimately, the success of the study was enabled by the pooling of the efforts of a large number of researchers from across the world and the molecular-genetic data of tens of thousands of individuals.

The scientists found a particularly strong similarity in terms of the pattern of SNPs between schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. This indicates that these two illnesses share a large number of common genetic factors. Evidence for a significant overlap in terms of contributory genetic factors was also found between bipolar disorder and major depression, as well as between schizophrenia and major depression. “In particular for schizophrenia and major depression, the study showed that the causes of these two psychiatric illnesses are more similar than previously thought, “explained Sven Cichon, Professor of Medical Genetics at the University of Basel. The results represent an important contribution to our understanding of these neuropsychiatric disorders, which occur frequently in the general population. They demonstrate biological similarities between disorders which have hitherto been defined diagnostically, and give impetus to the search for a system of causal disease classification.

Contact at the CIMH:

Prof. Dr. Marcella Rietschel
Central Institute of Mental Health
Department of Genetic Epidemiology in Psychiatry
E-Mail: marcella.rietschel@zi-mannheim.de
Publication:
Genetic relationship between five psychiatric disorders estimated from genome-wide SNPs. Cross-Disorder Group of the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium. Nature Genetics (2013) doi:10.1038/ng.2711

Link: http://www.nature.com/ng/journal/vaop/ncurrent/full/ng.2711.html

Sigrid Wolff | idw
Further information:
http://www.zi-mannheim.de

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht Researchers identify cause of hereditary skeletal muscle disorder
22.02.2017 | Klinikum der Universität München

nachricht Second cause of hidden hearing loss identified
20.02.2017 | Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Breakthrough with a chain of gold atoms

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

Im Focus: DNA repair: a new letter in the cell alphabet

Results reveal how discoveries may be hidden in scientific “blind spots”

Cells need to repair damaged DNA in our genes to prevent the development of cancer and other diseases. Our cells therefore activate and send “repair-proteins”...

Im Focus: Dresdner scientists print tomorrow’s world

The Fraunhofer IWS Dresden and Technische Universität Dresden inaugurated their jointly operated Center for Additive Manufacturing Dresden (AMCD) with a festive ceremony on February 7, 2017. Scientists from various disciplines perform research on materials, additive manufacturing processes and innovative technologies, which build up components in a layer by layer process. This technology opens up new horizons for component design and combinations of functions. For example during fabrication, electrical conductors and sensors are already able to be additively manufactured into components. They provide information about stress conditions of a product during operation.

The 3D-printing technology, or additive manufacturing as it is often called, has long made the step out of scientific research laboratories into industrial...

Im Focus: Mimicking nature's cellular architectures via 3-D printing

Research offers new level of control over the structure of 3-D printed materials

Nature does amazing things with limited design materials. Grass, for example, can support its own weight, resist strong wind loads, and recover after being...

Im Focus: Three Magnetic States for Each Hole

Nanometer-scale magnetic perforated grids could create new possibilities for computing. Together with international colleagues, scientists from the Helmholtz Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) have shown how a cobalt grid can be reliably programmed at room temperature. In addition they discovered that for every hole ("antidot") three magnetic states can be configured. The results have been published in the journal "Scientific Reports".

Physicist Dr. Rantej Bali from the HZDR, together with scientists from Singapore and Australia, designed a special grid structure in a thin layer of cobalt in...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Booth and panel discussion – The Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings at the AAAS 2017 Annual Meeting

13.02.2017 | Event News

Complex Loading versus Hidden Reserves

10.02.2017 | Event News

International Conference on Crystal Growth in Freiburg

09.02.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Microhotplates for a smart gas sensor

22.02.2017 | Power and Electrical Engineering

Scientists unlock ability to generate new sensory hair cells

22.02.2017 | Life Sciences

Prediction: More gas-giants will be found orbiting Sun-like stars

22.02.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>