Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Community-acquired pneumonia in influenza season: There's a bad strain on the rise

09.11.2009
ROME - Infections due to methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains are no longer confined to hospitals but occur more and more in communities.

Two articles in the European Respiratory Journal's November issue are dedicated to this dangerous and versatile microorganism.

For many years, MRSA infections were associated with hospitalised, high-risk patients.

Not only has the infection pattern recently shifted from hospital-acquired (nosocomial) to community-onset infections, but new strains have emerged, affecting young individuals, who don't have any risk factors. It seems that everything we know about these bacteria is becoming obsolete, to such an extent that a group of Italian researchers are now asking: "What is MRSA?"

This question (and the answer) is dealt with by Dr. Annalisa Pantosi from the Istituto Superiore di Sanita in Rome, Italy, and her colleagues in a current ERJ article.

Besides the hospital setting, every doctor associates MRSA with being a multiresistant bacterial pathogen - after all, even its name is based on its antibiotic sensitivity (or lack thereof). Able to destroy penicillin by producing an enzyme called penicillinase, MRSA earned its name because of a sophisticated genetic adaptation that enables it to bypass the effects of Methicillin, which blocks construction and maintenance of the bacterial cell wall. As a consequence, MRSA is resistant not only to methicillin but also to all beta-lactam antibiotics, including cephalosporins and carbapanems.

Staphylococcal infections are a concern not only from the respiratory point of view - the organ system commonly involved is the skin, with furunculosis and impetigo being frequent manifestations. In addition, they can result in serious bloodstream infections (sepsis) and can infect prosthetic implants.

The "new generation" of MRSA strains commonly causes skin and soft- tissue infections. However, even if cases of community-acquired pneumonia due to MRSA are still rare, when respiratory infections occur, they are severe and carry a high mortality.

"The estimated incidence is 0.51-0.64 cases per 100.000 people" report Dr. Konstantinos Vardakas and his colleagues from the Alfa Institute of Biomedical Sciences in Athens, Greece.

In Europe, the prevalence of infections due to this community-acquired MRSA (CA-MRSA) strain is lower than in the US. Nevertheless, physicians need to be aware of any infection that might be caused by a potentially multiple-drug resistant strain.

Moreover, MRSA-pneumonia in the community setting is often preceded by influenza or an influenza-like illness, a phenomenon that may well become relevant in the upcoming influenza season and amid the ongoing pandemic of H1N1 influenza, writes Dr. Alexandra Nakou in an accompanying editorial.

Dr. Nakou adds: "Although community-acquired MRSA is sensitive to several antibiotics such as clindamycin, trimethoprim-sulphamethoxazole and tetracyclines, the optimal treatment is not yet established. The current guidelines recommend the use of vancomycin or linezolid."

"MRSA should be part of the differential diagnosis of severe pneumonia during the influenza season, especially in patients with evidence of necrosis and in those with a history of MRSA infection".

Dr. Anka Stegmeier-Petroianu | idw
Further information:
http://www.ersnet.org

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht Organ-on-a-chip mimics heart's biomechanical properties
23.02.2017 | Vanderbilt University

nachricht Researchers identify cause of hereditary skeletal muscle disorder
22.02.2017 | Klinikum der Universität München

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Safe glide at total engine failure with ELA-inside

On January 15, 2009, Chesley B. Sullenberger was celebrated world-wide: after the two engines had failed due to bird strike, he and his flight crew succeeded after a glide flight with an Airbus A320 in ditching on the Hudson River. All 155 people on board were saved.

On January 15, 2009, Chesley B. Sullenberger was celebrated world-wide: after the two engines had failed due to bird strike, he and his flight crew succeeded...

Im Focus: Breakthrough with a chain of gold atoms

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

Im Focus: DNA repair: a new letter in the cell alphabet

Results reveal how discoveries may be hidden in scientific “blind spots”

Cells need to repair damaged DNA in our genes to prevent the development of cancer and other diseases. Our cells therefore activate and send “repair-proteins”...

Im Focus: Dresdner scientists print tomorrow’s world

The Fraunhofer IWS Dresden and Technische Universität Dresden inaugurated their jointly operated Center for Additive Manufacturing Dresden (AMCD) with a festive ceremony on February 7, 2017. Scientists from various disciplines perform research on materials, additive manufacturing processes and innovative technologies, which build up components in a layer by layer process. This technology opens up new horizons for component design and combinations of functions. For example during fabrication, electrical conductors and sensors are already able to be additively manufactured into components. They provide information about stress conditions of a product during operation.

The 3D-printing technology, or additive manufacturing as it is often called, has long made the step out of scientific research laboratories into industrial...

Im Focus: Mimicking nature's cellular architectures via 3-D printing

Research offers new level of control over the structure of 3-D printed materials

Nature does amazing things with limited design materials. Grass, for example, can support its own weight, resist strong wind loads, and recover after being...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Booth and panel discussion – The Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings at the AAAS 2017 Annual Meeting

13.02.2017 | Event News

Complex Loading versus Hidden Reserves

10.02.2017 | Event News

International Conference on Crystal Growth in Freiburg

09.02.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

New pop-up strategy inspired by cuts, not folds

27.02.2017 | Materials Sciences

Sandia uses confined nanoparticles to improve hydrogen storage materials performance

27.02.2017 | Interdisciplinary Research

Decoding the genome's cryptic language

27.02.2017 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>